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View Full Version : Early SAA Colt info?


Gary Cripps
July 24, 2009, 03:34 PM
Took a look this morning at a SAA Colt ser# 4980. I know this is very early (1873 to 1876) It is working condition with some surface rust. It has walnut grips. Where can I get a ball park value?

Hawg
July 24, 2009, 05:53 PM
1874. Very early number. Colt only made 200 in 1873.

Wildalaska
July 24, 2009, 06:18 PM
Pics are required but on a gun of that vintage it would be worth a minimum of 5K

WilditsararebirdAlaska TM

Jim Watson
July 24, 2009, 08:59 PM
I dunno about that. Local dealer has got a couple of old roaches like that in the showcase $3750 and $5000. Never a smell over three or four years. Old is not always gold.

James K
July 24, 2009, 09:52 PM
To even make a WAG, we would need some decent pictures. If "some surface rust" translates to a few specks of light rust on an otherwise pristine blue and case color finish, the value could go a lot higher than $5000. If "some surface rust" means it came off a sunken ship and what is left is the rough outline of a gun, the price goes down accordingly.

Jim

Wildalaska
July 24, 2009, 09:56 PM
Local dealer has got a couple of old roaches like that in the showcase $3750 and $5000.

4 digits?

Im assuming of course something more than a roach:D

WilditcocksgoesbangallmatchingpartsreadableetcAlaska TM

Wleoff
July 24, 2009, 10:09 PM
If you're serious about the S/N, contact Colt:

Colt Historical Department
Attn: Kathleen Hoyt
PO Box 1868
Hartford, CT 06144

I don't have a phone # handy. If that S/N is real, if I were you, I'd go buy lottery tickets.

Jim Watson
July 25, 2009, 05:11 AM
4 digits?

Well, no. But is a rusty 1874 THAT much more valuable than a rusty - pardon me, patinated - 1884?

Gary Cripps
July 25, 2009, 07:36 AM
The Colt is owned by a gent that married my widowed aunt. They were visiting and saw my gun room. He said He had some he didn't know anything about and invited me to take a look. That is how this started. Time will tell how it ends. Thanks All for the comments.

Wildalaska
July 25, 2009, 10:22 AM
But is a rusty 1874 THAT much more valuable than a rusty - pardon me, patinated - 1884?


To the right collector, yep.

WildyagottheyearguysthevariationguysthegenerationguysthecaliberguysAlaska TM

Im a Nagant year guy myself :)

Jim Watson
July 25, 2009, 04:48 PM
Blue Book says $14000 for a 1873-1874 at 10% finish, $6000 for a later gun.

Wow.

Gary Cripps
July 27, 2009, 08:06 PM
That's pretty serious money. How close is that to the actual market? I realise one has to find an interested buyer and those darn books never buy anything. I have collected old fishing tackle for 40 years, have lots of value guides, none are accurate.
Thanks, Gary

Gary Cripps
August 1, 2009, 03:46 PM
I was able to buy the SAA Colt. The ser# is 4909. I had it wrong in the original post. What do I do now? I want it cleaned and get as much history as possible. I don't want to try the cleaning on this one my self. I want to save as much of the original finish as possible. I do not want to sell it.

Hawg
August 1, 2009, 04:23 PM
You can get a factory letter from Colt. It used to be 100 bucks but not sure what it is now. It will tell you when it was made, the original finish, grips, barrel length, caliber and where it was originally shipped to. Not who, where.

Wildalaska
August 1, 2009, 04:45 PM
Dont clean it. It needs to be taken to a professional. Post some detailed pics

WildsowecangofromthereAlaska ™

James K
August 1, 2009, 10:41 PM
If you take that gun to a professional, talk to him a lot and make sure he knows what you want done. I know (or knew) a few "professionals" who started a "cleaning" job with a wire wheel. Some came close to being killed by their customers; IMHO it would have been justifiable homicide.

I would do it myself and use only something like G96 Gun Treatment and cloth or at most, a copper pot scrubber. No steel wool, no emery, no abrasive. And lots of patience and care. It is not unusual to spend a week cleaning an old gun with some rust on it, but patience will be rewarded. Get what my father called "the hurries" and you could cost yourself thousands of dollars.

Jim