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View Full Version : What's the proper stance for accuracy?


FrontSight
November 13, 2007, 02:39 PM
I know there are A LOT of different ones, but basically, do you crouch your head down at all to the gun, or do you keep your neck straight and bring the gun up to your line of sight to line up the sights?

I find it makes a huge difference in p.o.i. for me, where I wind up shooting 4 - 5 inches low when I crouch my head down...should I not be doing that?

Or should I keep doing that, and get different sights?

I've never had professional training or even guidance on marksmanship, so I'm not sure...

Thanks!

dwatts47
November 13, 2007, 02:40 PM
Bulls eye accuracy or defensive accuracy?

FrontSight
November 13, 2007, 02:43 PM
Oh, never thought about that...bullseye, please...

BCE_.357
November 13, 2007, 02:49 PM
I prefer the isosceles stance.

feet square, both arms extended and locked in front of you, body square to target. This allows the recoil to be absorbed between your shoulder blades and makes it a lot easier to acquire your next shot.

rellascout
November 13, 2007, 02:53 PM
Start with this and see if it helps. Grip effects my accuracy much more than stance but this should help with both.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4584332856867071363&q=handgun

Old Gaffer
November 13, 2007, 07:24 PM
Scrap5000 wrote
Oh, never thought about that...bullseye, please...


I (and every BE shooter I know) shoot single handed, with my forward foot pointing approximately downrange towards the target, and my rear foot pointed 90 (or slightly more or less, perhaps) degrees to the side.

My non-shooting hand is in my pocket or belt loop, my head erect. Even with a .22, the recoil can cause your non-shooting arm to swing and affect your shot.

If you're shooting low, move your rear foot straight back - this will raise your poi as it naturally forces your torso back. Moving your rear foot left or right changes your natural poi too, so I establish my left-right poi, then my up-down when I step to the line. You can do this with the "line cold" by sighting over your extended shooting hand closed into a fist. You have a "natural" groove (rear sight) in the pocket between your thumb and index finger knuckles, with the second knuckle on your index finger acting as a front sight. When you pick up your gun when the line is hot, you'll find you have very little if any correction needed before you squeeze off your first round.

There's an excellent (out of print) book by Russian shooting coach A.A.Yur'Yev entitled "Competitive Shooting ". The Yur'Yev book goes into a great deal of the physiology and ergomonics of shooting, and while BE shooting is all in the mind, i's the body that carries you to the line. I found my copy used on the 'net for a little less than $10 - and I've seen them go for more than $50, so shop carefully.

All the best,
Rob

HisSoldier
November 13, 2007, 07:48 PM
That IPSC stuff looks like fun on a platter! I watched most of the videos.

JohnKSa
November 13, 2007, 11:28 PM
The less you tilt your head the better. Your balance system (in your inner ears) works best with your head upright.

Also, you don't want to put your body into a stressing position since you'll have to be able to hold it for a reasonable period of time while you put rounds downrange.

FrontSight
November 14, 2007, 12:04 AM
All great info, thank you everyone

zukiphile
November 14, 2007, 10:11 AM
There's an excellent (out of print) book by Russian shooting coach A.A.Yur'Yev entitled "Competitive Shooting ". The Yur'Yev book goes into a great deal of the physiology and ergomonics of shooting, and while BE shooting is all in the mind, i's the body that carries you to the line. I found my copy used on the 'net for a little less than $10 - and I've seen them go for more than $50, so shop carefully.

All the best,
Rob

Reading books to learn to shoot seems counter-intuitive, but the benefit of a good teacher explaining in depth why he recommends as he does can give you the focus on correct technique that makes practice far more valuable.