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bcrash15
September 6, 2007, 01:57 PM
I'm going to pick up a new pistol in the next couple days. Are there any problems with shooting it immediately out of the box? When I buy a gun I normally like to try to break it down and make sure it is clean/lubed properly, but is it necessarily to be that obsessive with it? Thanks! I've very excited about it :D

Whirlwind06
September 6, 2007, 02:04 PM
I believe it is in your best interest to clean and lube it first.

MyXD40
September 6, 2007, 02:07 PM
I always break mine down, but noticed they are always clean, and lubed. Actually my first XD I bought I just took it out the box, and shot it within 10 minutes of buying it. Shot two hundred rounds through it. To this day, thousands and thousands and thoudands of rounds through it, no issues. (cleaned it of course when it does need a cleaning)

18DAI
September 6, 2007, 02:08 PM
I clean, lube, and examine both new, and new to me pistols, before firing them. I examine them closer, looking for wear, or damage, in case I missed anything in the shop, due to new toy syndrome. Regards 18DAI.

FNtastic!
September 6, 2007, 02:12 PM
Well... Just as yourself what you would want if someone came up and said that to you xD

Manedwolf
September 6, 2007, 02:52 PM
Clean and lube.

Factory preservatant lube is not the same as operational lubricant in a lot of guns.

Plus there may be metal shavings from manufacture. Clean it up.

JAYBIRD78
September 6, 2007, 02:58 PM
I always break down the pistol and clean and re lubricate. However, I think on 90% of the new guns that I have purchased I could have just shot and got away with it. The one gun I definitely had to clean first was my new CZ P-01, it was covered it oil and wrapped in plastic from the factory. This always gives you a chance to look over the instruction manual for any odds and ends.:p:p

sholling
September 6, 2007, 03:05 PM
I clean and lube first. Thankfully the closest range has a cleaning table and supplies right there. The main thing is to at the very least run a brush through the bore to make sure it's clean and obstruction free. I also like to make sure the action feels like it's smoothly locking up before pulling the trigger the first time.

ZeSpectre
September 6, 2007, 03:25 PM
My rule of thumb...
New guns are lubed for shipping NOT shooting.

I'm also fussy enough to want a complete takedown and inspection before I ever run the first round through the gun. I also offer the same service to my friends who aren't comfortable with detail stripping their guns.

It's amazing how many things I've found (from metal shavings and grit all the way to mis-machined parts) that were best taken care of before you start to run the gun.

Ranger325
September 6, 2007, 04:00 PM
Clean, inspect, lube................... shoot.
Repeat - :D

Regards,

PPGMD
September 6, 2007, 04:03 PM
I inspect, but I rarely lube, because most pistols are overlubed for shipping. I do cycle the slide a couple of times listening for any problems.

MichaelScott
September 6, 2007, 04:31 PM
Is it a Glock? If so then just shoot it. It'll be okay.

Not a Glock? Return it. Buy a Glock. Then go shoot it. It'll be okay.

Mark P.
September 6, 2007, 04:40 PM
Heh, Glock fanatics are always funny until their beloved ONLY pistol has a malfunction, then they are hilarious.

Hallucinator
September 6, 2007, 04:57 PM
I'd clean and lube it. New guns are sometimes really tight, and some slide grease is a good idea, otherwise you may get wear marks the first time you shoot it. The only time I've had a gun jam on me was when it was brand new, and it was because I didn't clean and lube (Sig 239).

Average Joe
September 6, 2007, 05:29 PM
Take it home, take it apart, and clean & lube before shooting the first time.

BigJimP
September 6, 2007, 06:52 PM
Wilson Combat ships their guns with a recommendation to shoot a couple hundred rounds thru it before you clean and lube it ........but I can't do it.

I always clean and lube a new gun before I take it to the range ......and I think it's important. But I also thoroughly clean and lube my guns every time I come home from the range.......nothing else makes any sense to me.

bcrash15
September 6, 2007, 10:07 PM
Thanks everyone, popular consensus seems to be to make sure it's done right, so that is how I'll treat it. I'm also glad to hear I haven't been wasting my time when I did this previously. The only gun I haven't done this was a revolver. I didn't think there were too many parts I could screw up shooting it without cleaning (although if I were to do it over I would at least have done the barrel and chambers.)

Ocraknife
September 6, 2007, 10:53 PM
I always shoot first then clean. I have never had a problem. Your milage may vary.

ActivShootr
September 6, 2007, 11:13 PM
When all else fails...RTFM!!!!!

DGindlesperger
September 6, 2007, 11:20 PM
Clean and lube....them shoot the heck out of it, if it' a auto 500 rounds before the next cleaning.

JohnKSa
September 6, 2007, 11:49 PM
I generally read the manual through at least once, field strip the gun and examine it carefully before going to the range the first time.

CajunBass
September 7, 2007, 03:40 AM
I've never bothered to and never had a problem.

(Mil-Surps excepted. I take a couple of days to clean the goop out of those things.)

Manedwolf
September 7, 2007, 03:50 AM
I'm also glad to hear I haven't been wasting my time when I did this previously.

Precaution of any sort when working with a gun is never wasted time.

TheNatureBoy
September 7, 2007, 06:51 AM
Its probably a good idea to check it out before firing. Like many others, I've taken a burner to the range with out checking it and haven't had any problems. Sure wouldn't hurt anything.

Don Lu
September 7, 2007, 07:03 AM
I would suggest reading the manual..For GLOCKS it actually reads "Note that the copper colored lubricant found on portions of the slide of brand new GLOCK pistols should not be removed, as it will help to provide long term lubrication of the slide"

Tanzer
September 7, 2007, 07:05 AM
My rule of thumb...
New guns are lubed for shipping NOT shooting.
+1. Who knows how long it has been sitting around? I'd especially worry that there is no film in the barrel.

Geoff Timm
September 7, 2007, 08:17 AM
I know at least one person who arranged to pick up his new pistol midweek at a combination shop/range. He wasn't an experienced pistol shooter so he paid the gunsmith to clean it and show him how to maintain it. Then an instructor took him to the range and worked with him for several hours teaching him the basics of self defense shooting.

This works if you are one of those rich shotgunners.

Geoff
Who has considerably less wealth, but wishes he could afford the process.

v65magnafan
September 7, 2007, 03:31 PM
I took home my SIG P226 refurb last night.

The manual said, clean it and lube it before firing. Although it looked clean, it had a layer of grease almost throughout.

I cleaned and lubed the gun and cleaned the barrel just to be sure. Already the trigger is smoother.

Also, if you don't know the gun, load only one round the first few times you fire it. Then, three, five, and finally, a full mag.

You never know.

Manedwolf
September 7, 2007, 03:44 PM
Also, if you don't know the gun, load only one round the first few times you fire it. Then, three, five, and finally, a full mag.

Never a full mag, right. If it decides to go full-auto, a short burst is better than hanging on for a full mag!

bcrash15
September 7, 2007, 04:12 PM
Well I picked it up today. There is no way I would shoot it in the state it came in without cleaning it. It definitely had some type of really tacky medium-grade oil on it for preservation. Even the mags came vacuum sealed in bags of oil.

Only thing I'm wondering about is that the recoil spring has got some sparingly applied bright green stuff on the barrel end of it and that might be some sort of specialty lubricant.

I guess the rest of it will get washed down with some rubbing alcohol and applied with the militec-1 that came with the gun. That has like a 3 range trip application procedure (apply, shoot, clean, apply, etc) That's what the manual and guy at shop recommend, and after doing that I think I'll start using slide grease on the rails and the militec everywhere else. Thanks for all the input!

Manedwolf
September 7, 2007, 04:21 PM
Only thing I'm wondering about is that the recoil spring has got some sparingly applied bright green stuff on the barrel end of it and that might be some sort of specialty lubricant.

If it's a SIG, that means the spring is rated for +P, that's all. :) It's paint!

KFDiesel
September 7, 2007, 05:52 PM
Dissassembling it and giving it a good once over, followed by a good lubing wont hurt a thing. It will also help familiarize you with the gun and ensure it is properly maintained. At least thats what I do. Just remember how to put it back togather.

ZeSpectre
September 7, 2007, 08:15 PM
Never a full mag, right. If it decides to go full-auto, a short burst is better than hanging on for a full mag!

Been there, done that, thanked God later it was a 7 round mag not a 16!!!

Manedwolf
September 7, 2007, 08:29 PM
Been there, done that, thanked God later it was a 7 round mag not a 16!!!

I sincerely hope to never do that. Especially since I tend to shoot at a range police practice at.

"Woah! -CENSORED--CENSORED--CENSORED-?! Wow, what a ride...Oh, hello officer..." :eek: :(

ZeSpectre
September 7, 2007, 08:35 PM
Okay, confession time... (note the embarassed look on my face), I WAS at a police range, I was LEO, and it was a gun I'd just gotten back from an armorer because the trigger broke.

Did I stop and think...hrmmm, this is essentially a new gun and I should follow test procedure first? Nope, just put my trust in the armorer.

I'll NEVER do that again! :o

LHB1
September 7, 2007, 09:28 PM
I prefer to clean and lube first, even on my new Wilson 1911's which come with a statement saying basically "Shoot as is, then clean". (Sorry, Bill W.)

Good shooting and be safe.
LB

KrustyBurger
September 7, 2007, 10:57 PM
In a perfect world, we'd all take it home, read the owner's manual (remember those?) from cover to cover, take it apart, clean & lube it, and then take it to the range with select ammos. But who among us hasn't just scooted right to a range at least one time and started blasting with our latest new toy, lol? Bad idea. I got a Baikal/Rem coach gun last year and luckily decided to give it a quick clean first. I found a long strip of hardened chrome flux-overspill stuck inside one of the barrels. It came out, not all that readily, but I was glad I didn't find out if it was dangerous the hard & explosive way.

steinermd
September 8, 2007, 11:42 PM
I picked up the nasty habit of clean and lube first from my father. It also doesn’t hurt to get that extra time getting to know the gun. The day I brought my Ruger Mark III home I took it apart cleaned it, tried to put it back together, hand wife read directions as I performed the actions. I didn't feel right about the way it went back together so I disassembled and reassembled a few more times until I was sure it would not fall apart the first time I fired it.

Silentarmy
September 9, 2007, 12:31 AM
I love to razz the kids with the greasy Glocks! This system is designed to run dry! The metallic copper compound on the frame rails is there for a reason!
Anything non-Glock gets TWO drops of rem oil at most! I use a product called Aero-lex Dry Moly Lube. This is a aerosol fast dry moly film sprayed onto both contacting surfaces. It requires a little masking sometimes but it is like Graphite powder! Slicker than Snail Snot and allows NO wear on metal to metal parts I have NEVER had a weapon malfunction that was not due to ammo issues! To each his own but Oil still attracts dirt! Just like it did 17 yrs ago in Basic training!

gordo_gun_guy
September 9, 2007, 12:54 AM
Read, clean, lube, read, function check. Maybe Mr. Wilson's creations aside, why wouldn't you check a 1911's disconnector, safety notch, etc? Why would'nt you check the firing pin on that CZ-52 before going to the range and hearing "click, s__t" instead of "click, bang"? Why not make sure that (insert traditional DA auto here) doesn't fire when it should de-cock? Even the Glock, was it new in box new or handled by every old fart at the counter new? Trust but verify and all that....

Then do the partial mag drill noted earlier. Hell, I've bought guns I'd have rather shot in a machine rest from behind a ballistic shield the first time.:D

A little mechanical curiosity combined with a healthy paranoia of trapped burning gases, impact sensitive priming compounds, and fast moving lead keeps the gunsmith away or something like that.

I always marvel at my best freind, who does ground up builds on classic muscle cars, but is totally terrified of even basic field stipping his guns for cleaning.:D

Jason_G
September 9, 2007, 04:37 PM
I generally read the manual through at least once, field strip the gun and examine it carefully before going to the range the first time.
^What he said^

Jason

Manedwolf
September 9, 2007, 05:23 PM
If you're really, really unsure of a gun, there's reduced-power practice rounds that might be good for a first firing.

At least for 9mm, there's the Dynamit Nobel primer-only plastic ones meant for the training version of the MP5. They won't cycle most semiautos, but they will fire with a muzzle energy of about 14ft/lbs, definitely not "kaboom" levels of pressure. If something comes off the gun with that, you know it's not good. ;)