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View Full Version : How bad is the Glock 20's recoil?


Ocraknife
August 26, 2007, 06:02 PM
I am jonesing for a 10 and the Glock 20 seems to be an accurate and economical choice. How is the recoil? How much worse is it than say a .357 mag?

JohnKSa
August 26, 2007, 06:44 PM
I find it to be less objectionable than the .357Mag from a full-sized revolver (GP100, for example).

Ocraknife
August 26, 2007, 07:48 PM
I find it to be less objectionable than the .357Mag from a full-sized revolver (GP100, for example).

Great, that is a perfect comparison, I've had a GP-100 and shooting .357mags out of it were no problem at all.

Officer's Match
August 26, 2007, 09:14 PM
It's purported to be much better than my Colt 10mm 1911, which, while stout, is quite managable. Certainly no worse than my 686 SW 357 Mag.

Ocraknife
August 26, 2007, 09:23 PM
this is encouraging. I know I must be crazy but my .357mag was far more managable than my .380 kel-tec.

Officer's Match
August 26, 2007, 09:27 PM
I'm actually thinking I want a 29, which I really was tempted to buy before I found my 23. Just didn't see any locally, but I would still like to have one. When Lone Wolf gets in their supply of 6" stainless slides for 20's, I'll have to get one (both 20 and a 6" LWD barrel/slide).

saspic
August 26, 2007, 11:30 PM
The G20 actually recoils softly. First it has a thick grip, which spreads out the forces across your palm. Many complain about the girth, but it helps prevent discomfort when shooting.
Also the slide is just a massive freaking piece of steel. This is the best approach to taming the 10 mil, and GLOCK is the only one that really nailed it. Finally, the polymer GLOCK frames flex under pressure, further taming recoil.
In the interest of full disclosure, my G29 does sting my hand after a few mags of the Winchester Silvertips. It's a peak pressure thing. Even higher powered Double Tap ammo doesn't hurt since McNett's thing is higher average pressure without that big peak in the center of the pressure curve.

Richard
August 26, 2007, 11:39 PM
I can shoot a box of 10mms in either my Glock 10mm or DW Patriot without flinching. I prefer the 10mm to the 40 S&W:) Regards, Richard:D

MTMilitiaman
August 27, 2007, 12:38 AM
I've seen a 16 year old girl do just fine with a Glock 20 shooting full power Double Taps.

It won't beat you up. Actually quite pleasant.

That said, that large grip can break your grip during rapid fire. It doesn't happen often, but I've had it happen to me.

Ocraknife
August 27, 2007, 08:48 AM
That said, that large grip can break your grip during rapid fire. It doesn't happen often, but I've had it happen to me.

With enough training perhaps I can overcome that tendency.

glock3020
August 27, 2007, 08:41 PM
ocraknife,iam just north of nash in springfield. i have a 20 if you want to put a few rounds thru it let me know

bullfrog99
August 27, 2007, 08:50 PM
The recoil of the glock 20 is about the same as the reciol of a 35 oz .357 magnum (ruger gp-100), but less sharp overall. It does make the bones in your wrist sore after a few magazines.

glockorama
August 27, 2007, 10:12 PM
I find the recoil of the 20 to be very manageable. It may be the polymer frame, but I enjoy shooting it as much as any other gun I own. I would concur with the above postings that it is no more than full-load 357's in my 4" 686. You won't be sorry with a Glock 20. :D

http://a982.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/images01/98/l_f2c38a016334b297817c0941c74098fd.jpg

wayneinFL
August 27, 2007, 10:20 PM
It's manageable. A little muzzle flip, but no hard stinging recoil- the fat grip and polymer frame take most of that out of it.

Desertscout1
August 28, 2007, 11:39 PM
My wife is about 5'4" and 105 lbs and she shoots my G20 and absolutely loves it. I don't think the recoil can even be compared to a .357.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v519/Desertscout1/IMG_G20.jpg

Wiskey_33
August 29, 2007, 12:28 PM
I just got the 29 and love it. Everyone says bad things about the recoil, but I just assume they're saying that from what they've heard...it's not bad at all. I was shooting a Ruger SP101 in 2.25" barrel with full house .357's...now that was not too much fun...

cW

mdell2
August 29, 2007, 03:38 PM
I also have the Glock 29 and I love it. It is a little thick but 10 + 1 of 10mm is impressive. The recoil is not bad at all. I would put it in par with a standard 45 ACP. I had mine Magna Ported and she's a dream to shoot. Hardly any recoil now but she makes some noise and you can feel the concussion (I shoot indoors). You won't go wrong. The 10 mm is making a come back, so go for it. There is a wide range of ammo from very light (like a.40 S&W) to heavy duty stuff to bring down elephants and small buildings (lol). :)

CritRxDoc
August 30, 2007, 03:57 PM
The G-20 is a dream to shoot. As long as the grip fits your hand (it is wide) and the grip angle that everyone complains about (you can tell I don't buy it) doesn't bother, you you will love it:D

Ocraknife
September 1, 2007, 05:23 PM
I bought one today and shot it, the recoil isn't bad at all. Even with higher powered rounds it isn't bad. The flash was more than I expected and the noise may or may not have been bad (I dont' really notice it when I am the one doing the shooting.) but all and all I am pleased.

Peter M. Eick
September 3, 2007, 12:34 PM
Its pretty reasonable if you can get used to the way the frame flexes during recoil. I never could overcome this and after about 3 or 4 thousand rounds I sold my G20 to my boss. He does not mind so I see it at the range routinely.

Ocraknife
September 3, 2007, 03:34 PM
Its pretty reasonable if you can get used to the way the frame flexes during recoil.

I can't imagine it would bother me, in fact I didn't notice it at all.

longeyes
September 3, 2007, 04:19 PM
"Flex" on a microscopic level. We're not talking about rippling polymer here.:D

glockorama
September 3, 2007, 06:09 PM
frame flexes during recoil

Wha??:confused:

Peter M. Eick
September 6, 2007, 07:59 PM
Flex, you know to bend, like when you the recoil of a stout 10mm round causes the slide to hit the frame and then the whole frame and grip flexes or bends during recoil.

Or more black and white. That feeling you get when you grab your 10mm and take up a stout grip and you find the grip frame bending or twisting as you grab it.

That problem.

If you have never felt the frame flex, either you grip it very different then I do, you don't shoot nuclear reloads or your G20 was different then mine. None of my metal frame 10mm's did it so in the end, the G20 had to go. Neat gun, too bad it was not made out of metal.

MTMilitiaman
September 6, 2007, 08:14 PM
With it field stripped, I can get a stout grip on the frame and make it flex some. But it flexes very, very little with the slide on it and I can't recall ever feeling it flex during recoil or while shooting it, even with full power Double Taps or max listed reloads.

glockorama
September 6, 2007, 09:09 PM
Yeah, I've pulled some pretty nasty "nuke" loads in my 20 from Doubletap and handloads. Can't say I ever noticed any "flexing". But I guess everyones experience is different.

Ocraknife
September 6, 2007, 10:51 PM
Flex, you know to bend, like when you the recoil of a stout 10mm round causes the slide to hit the frame and then the whole frame and grip flexes or bends during recoil.

Or more black and white. That feeling you get when you grab your 10mm and take up a stout grip and you find the grip frame bending or twisting as you grab it.

That problem.

If you have never felt the frame flex, either you grip it very different then I do, you don't shoot nuclear reloads or your G20 was different then mine. None of my metal frame 10mm's did it so in the end, the G20 had to go. Neat gun, too bad it was not made out of metal.

I shot some pretty powerful rounds tonight and still didn't notice any flex. It wouldn't surprise me if the frame did flex but it wasn't noticable to me.

I would imagine neary everything, and I mean everything flexes to some degree, if even at a molecular level, under stress. The question is, how detectable is it? Personally, I don't notice it so I suppose I am fortunate that, I either hold the gun wrong or am not sensitive enough to notice it.

Nail Shooter
September 7, 2007, 11:19 AM
The G20 booms pretty loudly and usually will attract a crowd. They also really put brass into orbit when shooting full power loads. A 20 or 22lb recoil spring assembly helps with the heavy loads.

Nail

Peter M. Eick
September 8, 2007, 06:41 PM
I really noticed the flexing when I switched from my G20 to my Witness then to my 1911 10mm and back to the G20. Only a couple of times and I said to myself "the glocks got to go".

Ocraknife
September 8, 2007, 06:57 PM
I really noticed the flexing when I switched from my G20 to my Witness then to my 1911 10mm and back to the G20. Only a couple of times and I said to myself "the glocks got to go"

Strange, I still haven't noticed any flex. I am curious, how much more did your Glock flex when it fired than your 1911 and what equipment did you use to measure it?

Desertscout1
September 9, 2007, 12:28 AM
Of course you didn't notice any flex. It happens only at the instant of firing and cannot be seen except in slow motion photography. Be assured that all Glock frames flex pretty significantly under recoil.

Go watch this video and pay close attention to the frame:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8309414592630275524

The flex of the frame is also why some Glock owners have issues with rail-mounted tactical lights.

Ocraknife
September 9, 2007, 03:31 AM
Of course you didn't notice any flex. It happens only at the instant of firing and cannot be seen except in slow motion photography. Be assured that all Glock frames flex pretty significantly under recoil.

Thanks for the info and cool video link. Since I don't notice it and can't detect it except with slow motion video is the flex even something I need to be concerned about? If anything I could imagine that the flex might actually dampen felt recoil and perhaps lead to a longer component lifespan. Is my thinking flawed?

Peter M. Eick
September 9, 2007, 06:05 AM
I feel it in my hand when the gun fires.

To me it is pretty darn obvious that when the gun fires you can feel the recoil motion of the slide and barrel in the palm and grip of your hand.

So, if you can't feel it, have you ever concentrated on just one aspect of your shooting at a time to try and improve? For example have you ever spent a day at the range where all you do is worry about exactly when the gun fires or exactly how does it recoil or exactly where was the front sight during recoil?

For me, every day is a day like that. I focus on one thing only and work it to perfection. Next week it is something different. After an average of 15,000 rnds a year for the last 7 years I have gotten to know a lot about my guns.

Alleykat
September 9, 2007, 09:24 AM
Glock frame flexing is a big "plus"!

Desertscout1
September 9, 2007, 10:09 AM
Thanks for the info and cool video link. Since I don't notice it and can't detect it except with slow motion video is the flex even something I need to be concerned about? If anything I could imagine that the flex might actually dampen felt recoil and perhaps lead to a longer component lifespan. Is my thinking flawed?
Yes, between the low axis of recoil and the flex of the frame under recoil, the Glock seems to me to have less perceived recoil than any other handgun of the same caliber in the industry.

Ocraknife
September 9, 2007, 11:15 AM
I feel it in my hand when the gun fires.
To me it is pretty darn obvious that when the gun fires you can feel the recoil motion of the slide and barrel in the palm and grip of your hand.
So, if you can't feel it, have you ever concentrated on just one aspect of your shooting at a time to try and improve? For example have you ever spent a day at the range where all you do is worry about exactly when the gun fires or exactly how does it recoil or exactly where was the front sight during recoil?
For me, every day is a day like that. I focus on one thing only and work it to perfection. Next week it is something different. After an average of 15,000 rnds a year for the last 7 years I have gotten to know a lot about my guns.


When I go to the range I only focus on having the bullet hit as close to my point of aim as possible and as quickly as is prudent.

It is pretty clear that you are a far more advanced shooter than I am and perhaps with time and practice I'll be able to pickup on some of the nuances that you describe. However, I don't currently have the time or the budget to fire nearly 300 rounds a week. I probably average more like 200-300 rounds a month.

Alleykat
September 9, 2007, 11:53 AM
I feel it in my hand when the gun fires.
To me it is pretty darn obvious that when the gun fires you can feel the recoil motion of the slide and barrel in the palm and grip of your hand.
So, if you can't feel it, have you ever concentrated on just one aspect of your shooting at a time to try and improve? For example have you ever spent a day at the range where all you do is worry about exactly when the gun fires or exactly how does it recoil or exactly where was the front sight during recoil?
For me, every day is a day like that. I focus on one thing only and work it to perfection. Next week it is something different. After an average of 15,000 rnds a year for the last 7 years I have gotten to know a lot about my guns.

Sounds more like compulsive-obsessive disorder than shooting fun, to me! ;)

varoadking
September 9, 2007, 11:54 AM
...can't detect it except with slow motion video...

You're a better man than me - I didn't see anything I'd categorize as "flex" in the video either.

The piece simply moves in the shooter's hands - then entire frame - and all at the same time...

Peter M. Eick
September 10, 2007, 03:38 PM
I may be compulsive or excessive, but I want to shoot the best groups I can. I freely admit it. I am a casual target shooter and my goal is to put every round down the same hole on the paper. It is not what most do, but I am trying to get good enough for NRA Bullseye type shooting. Thus why I only shoot 50 shot groups per page and the flex of the glock drove me up the wall. While I shoot revolvers much better then I shoot auto's, here is where I am at today. These are all at 15 yards, offhand, 50 shots per target.

http://pages.sbcglobal.net/eickpm/psp_15yrds.jpg

http://pages.sbcglobal.net/eickpm/210-6_target.jpg

Here is an example of what I shoot for target practice, again 50 shots, 15 yards, offhand.

http://pages.sbcglobal.net/eickpm/pre25_best_target.jpg

Desertscout1
September 10, 2007, 04:16 PM
Your G20 should shoot at least as well as that revolver at that close of a range if you can do your part. Of course, it also depends on how fast you're shooting and other factors.

quickcanary
September 10, 2007, 05:38 PM
Peter, it's too bad the Glock didn't work for you. It doesn't seem that most people are affected by the flex, but maybe with as much experience as you've had, you are more sensitive to it and therefore better at detecting it. Not much of an issue though, as it's clear there are other firearms that you're proficient with. You truly are skilled when shooting revolvers; I can't seem to get decent groups with any of them. :o I'd feel much more confident defending myself with my Glock vs. the revolvers I've shot. More practice could probably remedy that.

Peter M. Eick
September 10, 2007, 08:01 PM
Key point. I don't think I ever once have complained about the G20's accuracy. I put a KKM barrel into it and it would take nuclear power reloads and was quite accurate. The problem for me was frame flex. I tried to work it out but after blowing around 4000 rounds down the gun I just gave up.

It is an accurate, reliable gun though.

JohnKSa
September 10, 2007, 11:28 PM
The problem for me was frame flex.Yup, although I can't detect it myself, that's not the first time I've heard that complaint.

Ocraknife
September 11, 2007, 08:15 AM
Great groupings Peter. Whatever you are doing, keep doing it. With the amount rounds you shoot, I imagine you would feel little nuances in firearm handling. As for myself, with the price of ammo these days, especially 10mm ammo, I have pared my shooting down considerably.