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View Full Version : new (used) beretta 92fs, what to do?


DanielG
September 19, 2005, 03:14 PM
hi guys. I just bought a police trade-in 92fs last week. The piece seems to work fine. Havent fired it yet though. Should I just buy a wolff spring kit and change out all the springs, just to be safe? BTW the gun is not a carry piece yet, only a night stand gun

Half-Price Assassin
September 19, 2005, 03:20 PM
how did you pay for it? i have seen alot of used police trade 92fs, that looked really beat up. i dont have much knowledge on berettas, but if i did buy a used gun, i would probably replace all the major springs, get some brand new mags, and perhaps detail strip it, to see if all the parts look good. being a police trade, it was probably abused very much. cops like to take out there fusteration on their side arms, for some odd reason (my guess is because they can get brand new ones for low-low prices). :confused:

DanielG
September 19, 2005, 03:26 PM
this one looks almost new, the finish on the frame rails hasent even worn off yet

DanielG
September 19, 2005, 03:27 PM
i payed with a credit card

Half-Price Assassin
September 19, 2005, 03:29 PM
ha ha! i ment how much! sorry about that! :D

TheEgg
September 19, 2005, 04:39 PM
If it looks in that good of a condition, I would shoot it first. If it functions fine, I probably would just leave the springs alone until I had put about 5,000 rounds through it, then do the spring/block replacement thing on it.

TN-popo
September 19, 2005, 04:50 PM
I've bought a couple of police turn-in Berettas.

The internals are generally pretty nice...all I did was replace the recoil spring and trigger spring (the only reason I change the trigger spring is I like Wolff's "INS" trigger spring for all my 92s and 96s).

At a minimum, I'd change the recoil spring (I do this with all used pistols I buy).
Best

IZinterrogator
September 19, 2005, 06:33 PM
Most police trade-ins have a worn finish from holster wear and LNIB internals because they have only been shot for occasional qualification. Shoot it to test reliability first. If it shoots fine, don't worry about it.

JohnKSa
September 19, 2005, 10:43 PM
Go ahead and buy the kit. If the installed recoil spring feels about the same as the new one, then you have a spare spring kit on hand for use later. ;)

KP345PR
September 19, 2005, 11:37 PM
be careful with that weapon, i had an old instructor show me some interesting tricks with that weapon....i pointed it at him as he requested (with snap caps, of course). he grabbed the gun with his right hand, hit the breakdown button with his thumb, and flipped the dissasembly lever with his middle finger. then smacked me on the top of the head with my own slide; all within the course of about 1-2 seconds! yes, i sold it two days later =X

DanielG
September 19, 2005, 11:49 PM
i bought it from http://www.jgsales.com/ it was $399 plus $20 sameday fedex. Its a police special model with all metal parts and a straight dustcover. They said they had quite a few of them left.

Striker1
September 20, 2005, 04:22 AM
My suggestion is get the operator's manual (if it wasn't included) and function check the weapon.

Then...disassemble and lay the recoil spring besides the barrel, it should be the same length or a little longer. Also check the spring for flat spots worn on the inside

Then...inspect all metal parts for any burrs or cracks paying close attention to the thin part of the slide where the lockiing block lugs rest.

Be sure to closely inspect the locking block lugs for cracks.

Then...run you fingers along the outside of the barrel to see if it has any bulges

If you have any doubts have a qualified gunsmith check it out

TN-popo
September 20, 2005, 11:53 AM
I got my police trade-in B92 from www.summitgunbroker.com for $269. + $15. shipping.

Fremmer
September 20, 2005, 12:13 PM
Striker's suggestion about checking the pistol is good.

If you don't find any problems when you check it, take it out and shoot it before buying the new spring set.

If it needs new springs, the pistol will let you know. On the other hand, if the pistol shoots reliably, then you've saved yourself the cost of an unnecessary spring set.

JohnKSa
September 20, 2005, 09:34 PM
be careful with that weapon, i had an old instructor show me some interesting tricks with that weapon....i pointed it at him as he requested (with snap caps, of course). he grabbed the gun with his right hand, hit the breakdown button with his thumb, and flipped the dissasembly lever with his middle finger. then smacked me on the top of the head with my own slide; all within the course of about 1-2 seconds! yes, i sold it two days later =XSure, I'll be happy to demonstrate that same thing to anyone who has an UNLOADED gun.

I'll also be happy to demonstrate how easy it is to pull the trigger before someone gets their hands on your gun.

This quasi-urban-legend got started after a scene in a movie showed something like that happening. Close-ups of the scene showed that the takedown lever was already in the down position before the move was attempted. See for yourself... (http://www.pollardfamily.net/lw4/lw4.htm)

If this kind of thing bothers you, there are take down levers available for the Beretta that are much harder to operate. Personally, I think the best anti-take down lever is the trigger. ;)

BTW, I wish I had been there two days after your instructor's "demonstration". Would have been nice to get a good deal on a hardly used pistol...