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View Full Version : Beretta Slide stop broke!


strange246
September 18, 2005, 03:34 PM
My buddy and I went to the range today and while he was shooting his Beretta 92, the slide stop broke off the side of the gun, upon inspection this part looks to be a casting (poor design in my opinion) anyone know where to get a replacement or better yet, an aftermarket one thats made from regular steel?

IM_Lugger
September 18, 2005, 06:22 PM
I believe you’re talking about a locking block…I never had that problem so not sure where to get the part. Is the gun still under warranty? I'd just take it to a gun shot and ask them.

Now, I’m interested how many rounds did your friend put through the gun?

mete
September 18, 2005, 06:57 PM
The locking block is inside the gun, he said the part outside the gun.I wonder if it's an MIM part .

strange246
September 18, 2005, 08:06 PM
IM_Lugger It's not the locking block, it's the slide stop/slide release lever on the side of the pistol that you release the slide with....mete, it looks like it's either cast or MIM...Either way...Cheap crap...The gun is an older model so I doubt he can get it fixed under warranty...Found a few factory ones online anyhow, but I was hoping to find an aftermarket one for him thats actually REAL metal...

boing
September 18, 2005, 08:18 PM
...this part looks to be a casting (poor design in my opinion)..

I don't know what process Beretta uses for their slide stops, but cast parts properly hardened work quite well in various applications. It's obviously not a "poor design" problem since so many hundreds of thousands of Berettas made by the same process don't suffer premature slide stop breakage.

Whether forged, cast, or MIM, a failed part will still show a granular structure at the point of failure, and all three methods can exhibit porosity/voids.

Ultima-Ratio
September 18, 2005, 11:22 PM
Greeting from Anchorage, I saw the same thing last Sunday on a blue 92 and today on a stainless 92 :eek:
Anyhoo the parts only job is to hold the slide open and the gun runs fine without it other than the obvious slide not staying open.
Maybe one of the aftermarket Beretta places offer a forged part??

Pointer
September 19, 2005, 04:17 AM
This is a very common problem with the 92's

The military issue of 92's, literally millions of them contracted to a foreign manufacturer, were rejected by the special warfare people because the stops were breaking away after 3000+ rounds. The Seals went back to 1911's and shortly thereafter they went with the Sig. This all took place back in the early days and I don't know if Beretta ever did a recall or compensated anyone.

Many gun dealers knew of this problem and sold them anyway, believing that most of their clientele were highly unlikely to ever shoot 3000+ rounds and in the future years when the guns were more than a little old, if they broke, the cost would be absorbed by the owners. :(

I didn't like the sound of it then, and I don't like it now. :mad:

Because of this Beretta improved the 92 and renamed it the 92FS.
Despite the correction, I will never own a Berreta and will talk them down to anyone who will listen. :p

Beretta may have an after market "fix" for the 92... check with them.
I would be surprised if they do, because they "Don't have to correct it" and they already have a lot of our money flowing into Italy.

Unregistered
September 19, 2005, 06:58 AM
Pointer, I am not sure what you are saying is correct.

The 92 was revised and renamed the 92 FS because of changes made to the slide and the way it locks up. There were a few well documented instances of slides coming detached from the frame when fired with hot ammo. Is this what you are referring to? This problem was prevented with changes made in the 92 FS.


This has nothing to do with the slide stop, which just holds the slide back when the last shot in a magazine is fired.

IM_Lugger
September 19, 2005, 08:33 AM
Despite the correction, I will never own a Berreta and will talk them down to anyone who will listen you're missing out, I feel sorry for you....

candide
September 19, 2005, 08:53 PM
Same thing happened to my stainless 96 Brig. I called Beretta and they sent me a new one, but in black. Without the slide release lever, the slide won't lock back when the magazine is empty; I first thought that my thumb was riding on the lever, but found the lever on the ground. It took about 10 minutes to replace the lever.

Guntec
September 19, 2005, 10:23 PM
It's common to have INOX/Stainless Steel slide stop to snap off. That's probably why they sent the black one instead.

Pointer
September 21, 2005, 03:05 AM
Unregistered

You are right, but coming short of target...

I read this article in an old thick book... a Shooters Bible or something, many years ago.

The article stated that the Seals were first to discover the flaws because they were the only ones shooting 1000's of rounds with their new Berettas.

When it happened to several of their guns... they opted for the other options I mentioned above.

The military started running some internal/informal tests and found that this problem repeated itself sometime after the first 3000 rounds.

I'm not sure which "stops" we're talking about... I just know that the Spec Ops people lost faith in the weapon as a result of the defects.

Word was that when they were in a "hot spot", they didn't want the gun falling apart in their hands or, worse, flying back in their faces.

I admit to my prejudice against the Beretta... But am too angry a the whole idea that they would EVER allow the weapon to be delivered to the US Military with a flaw that could have been VERY EASILY prevented with the simplest of tests... The 1911 was subjected to simple but vigorous testing as was the BAR. The Beretta clearly was not.

Thank you for pointing out that we are talking about different stops... but, if there were two different "stops" that were bad, it speaks volumes...

My main complaint is that the socialistic Italians have no great love for us... and they have proven this repeatedly, ever since the beginning of WWII and after we pounded them. They have even released known Terrorists wanted in this country, back into the world, rather than turn them over to the U.S.

And how we could have given an exclusive contract to them when we didn't even do that for the American made 1911's, BARs, Garands etc... it makes me :barf:

So, I have no desire to boost their economy with American $ :p


IM_Luggar

You are too kind! :rolleyes:

Pointer
September 21, 2005, 03:13 AM
Unregistered

You are right, but coming short of target...

I read this article in an old thick book... a Shooters Bible or something, many years ago.

The article stated that the Seals were first to discover the flaws because they were the only ones shooting 1000's of rounds with their new Berettas.

When it happened to several of their guns... they opted for the other options I mentioned above.

The military started running some internal/informal tests and found that this problem repeated itself sometime after the first 3000 rounds.

I'm not sure which "stops" we're talking about... I just know that the Spec Ops people lost faith in the weapon as a result of the defects.

Word was that when they were in a "hot spot", they didn't want the gun falling apart in their hands or, worse, flying back in their faces.

I admit to my prejudice against the Beretta... But am too angry at the whole idea that they would EVER allow the weapon to be delivered to the US Military with a flaw that could have been VERY EASILY prevented with the simplest of tests... The 1911 was subjected to simple but vigorous testing as was the BAR. The Beretta clearly was not.

Thank you for pointing out that we are talking about different stops... but, if there were two different "stops" that were bad, it speaks volumes...

My main complaint is that the socialistic Italians have no great love for us... and they have proven this repeatedly, ever since the beginning of WWII and after we pounded them. They have even released known Terrorists wanted in this country, back into the world, rather than turn them over to the U.S.

And how we could have given an exclusive contract to them when we didn't even do that for the American made 1911's, BARs, Garands etc... it makes me :barf:

So, I have no desire to boost their economy with American $$$ :p


IM_Luggar

You are too kind! :rolleyes:

SteveinAK
September 21, 2005, 12:24 PM
First, I'll start off by saying everyone is entitled to their opinion, but:
I have been a small arms maintainer and weapons instructor in the Air Force for 5+ years now, and before that a cop for 8 yrs carrying a Beretta in the AF on a daily basis. I used to have the same opinions about Beretta's, until I crosstrained. I have NEVER seen a slide stop break on a Beretta, not one. I have seen locking blocks break, and right side decocking levers break. I have seen a couple of slides shear in half forward of the breech face. These pistols did not have 3k rounds thru them, these were training weapons with 60K+ rounds thru them. The M9 (92FS) WILL NOT allow the slide to come back off the frame. It's stopped by an oversize hammer pin. The early Beretta's didn't have the oversize hammer pin. The early slides failed at low round counts for the Seals (and some Marine Recon) due to them fireing a large amount of ammuntion intended for the MP5 (a +P+ load) thru the Beretta's AND a metallurgy issue with the slides. The problem WAS FIXED! And as far as Beretta's lining the Italians pockets, our Beretta's are made in Acokeek(?), Maryland. Here in the US of A, with American employees. I have spent quite a bit of time in my career stationed in Italy, and the Italians don't hate Americans. The Italians I've met were great people! We're not talking about the French here...

Oh, and PS: I am a 1911 guy.

Loupgarou
September 21, 2005, 07:43 PM
I bought a 92 back in circa 1986. It may have been a 92F. The mag release was at the base of the butt and the safety on the frame, not the slide. I seem to remember that it had been manufactured in Italy. I'm sure I shot considerably fewer than 3,000 rounds through it. One day, in the course of a Hogan's Alley drill in an overseas gun range, the slide failed to lock back and a (retaining?) pin on the left side of the slide block area just slid out completely and fell off. I remember that a gunsmith told me that this pin-like part had slid out because it had been battered thin by repeated shooting (with non +P ammo). That was a pre-military contract model that I had. I felt lucky that I didn't end up like the Benicio del Toro character in Sin City, with a unicorn decoration on my forehead. I now own a 92FS and I understand that they don't have that problem anymore, but I think about it anyway whenever I shoot the gun.

cje1980
September 21, 2005, 08:45 PM
Pointer, you are referring to a completely different problem that was solved in its entirety about 20yrs. ago. Even the 1911 had to be refined quite a few times before it was accepted as "battle-ready". Heck it was redesigned in 1926 after WWI to prevent shooters from getting pinched by the trigger. Can you imagine being in a stressful combat situation and being pinched by the trigger while shooting. No weapon has ever been perfect from the start and I would have to say that the civilian 92FS has all its bugs worked out. In my experience with the 92FS, I have fired about 10,000 rds. without a single failure and can shoot any HP I like and know that it will feed and fire reliably unlike some designs. I know of one 20,000 rd. torture test with a 92FS using tons and tons of +p and +p+. The current Beretta 92FS is an excellent weapon that is deadly reliable and reasonably accurate up to about 50yds. from my experience. I haven't shot another semi-auto that is as reliable and fail-proof than a Beretta 92. Reliability is the most important aspect of a handgun designed for combat and the current design of the Beretta is flawless.

JohnKSa
September 21, 2005, 08:49 PM
Pointer,

Different problem. The problem you're talking about has been heavily discussed on the web and on this forum if you're interested in finding out more about it.

IM_Lugger
September 21, 2005, 09:28 PM
Pointer

Beretta WAS tested extensively in the ’85 trails and it DID pass...

Now there were a few (3-4) documented cases where the slide broke off and injured a shooter (seal). That problem was FIXED in the ‘88 by preventing the slide to go all the way back. Also metal toughness was determined the main problem. But it happened after 20,000-30,000 , NOT 3000!

the few problems that existed have been worked out for quite some time now and Beretta 92FS is (still) a top choice for quality reliable sidearms. :)

Pointer
September 22, 2005, 02:03 AM
JohnKSa

Thank you...
I think I am still bitter about the citizen/government sellout of GI's since the Korean and through the Nam conflicts... right on down to today in Iraq. :mad:

I tend to see the whole Beretta thing more as a symbol of a sellout than as the pretty fine gun I know the FS to be.

Damn... I never thought I'd admit that publicly!

I'd better go brush my teeth. :D


cje1980

The FS is a good piece... I take my patriotism too seriously... if that's possible.

My experience with Italians has been dotted with questions like why did we do all those terrible things to the Indians? And unfriendly comments about our right wing publications like the Reader's Digest. As if the Romans weren't Italians. :rolleyes:

It's hard to remain objective.


SteveinAK

I'm sure I am too harsh...
But, a Japanese car made in the US, still sends the really big US bucks to Japan.

I guess I'm just not ready for the New World Order. :D

Of course, you are right, the Italians are not the French... I was stationed in France as an MP for three. Maybe I just saw the seamy side.


IM Luggar

Yes, the 92FS is a good gun... :(

Damn... this hurts. :eek:

Chindo18Z
September 22, 2005, 06:47 AM
strange246: Rare occurrance but not unheard of. I've seen two different 92 decocker/safety levers broken off. I know the safety lever is an aluminum alloy...perhaps the slide-stop is the same? It occasionally happens to weapons with protruding alloy MIM/cast parts. They can be struck a glancing blow that causes the part to shear (much like shaping a flint arrowhead or trimming brick with a masonry hammer)

I wouldn't sweat it. Just have your friend order a new one.

All steel, forged? I'm unaware of anyone making one, but there might be something out there.

Boss Spearman
September 22, 2005, 11:34 PM
Yeah, but Japanese car makers give unemployed Americans jobs. American companies meanwhile ship all their jobs overseas and lay off more Americans.

Keeping on topic, for my vote the 92FS is the best 9mm made.

That may only be because I haven't yet been able to afford and HK.

Jack Malloy
September 23, 2005, 09:56 AM
The military test fired Berettas for 10,000 rounds before a parts failure, which was one reason why they adopted them. the Smiths were breaking at 7,000 rounds and some Sigs did too.

The slide stop is an investment cast part on the B-92, as is the thumb safety. I would say this is not so much a design flaw as it is an example of an improperly heat treated individual part or lot of guns.
A forged slide stop that is not heat treated properly would fail too.

One of my friends was a cop and his B-92 has had about 12,000 rounds through it and it is still going strong. I know of others that have had upwards of 30,000 rounds through them without a parts failure.
This sort of thing can happen to anybody.Remember two years ago when Glock turned loose a run of pistols with frames that were cracking?

The Navy Seals were using S&W 66 revolvers and Beretta 92s pistols when Demo Dick Marchinko was in.
The part that was changed was the flange on the bottom of the front strap near the grip. It would crack after so many rounds were fired, Marcinko talked to the factory about it and they beefed up the area in front of the grip strap near the edge. Look at a pic of the Beretta and the Taurus and you will see what I am talking about.
Marcinko mentioned it in his book, Rogue Warrior.
The Seals adopted an aftermarket slide from a company named Phrobis, then later the Sig. They never seemed to much care for the 1911, except for individual frogmen that had experience with it.
Much of SEAL weaponry comes around from the guys wanting something different from everybody else, by the way, not so much because there is something major wrong with what the other branches are using.
Do you have a problem with customized .45s like Delta Force used? Well, the SEALS did. See what I mean.