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View Full Version : I have the mythical PX4!


Wynterbourne
September 16, 2005, 01:41 PM
Well, I did it. I have a brand spanking new Beretta PX4 F-series 9mm in my possession. I wasn't 100 percent sure until I got it in my hand. But as soon as I did, I knew it had to be mine.

This puppy is -sweet-. The first thing that I noticed was that all of the controls were readily accessible by my hands. That almost never happens. I didn't feel that the controls were smallish, more like they were intelligently arranged, if that makes any sense.

The decocker/safety is easy to both reach and operate. However, there is a very definite 'snap' when it moves into position. I don't think you're going to accidentally decock the weapon, or engage the safety, on this model. The slide release was simple to operate by a simple shift of the thumb. The magazine release was right where my thumb thought it should be, no fumbling was necessary.

The sights are well formed and provide a positive sight picture. They weren't as bright as I hoped, but that was under flourescent lighting. I mean, they were definitely visible, but not as 'white' as the dots on my B.Eagle. I haven't had the opportunity to check out the 'Luminova' feature, yet.

The magazines seemed well constructed, but I haven't taken too close of a look yet. They are drop free magazines, and do hold a full 17 rounds. Those last 2 rounds are a real pain in the assets to get in though. Maybe I've just turned into a little wuss using my mag loaders.

It's extremely light, or at least it felt so to me. But then again, I've been firing a hefty 38oz B.Eagle for some time now. It only weighs about 27 ounces, which is a COMPLETELY different feel from the all steel beasts I've been handling.

I haven't been able to break it down yet, but I did notice something odd. When you retract the slide, you can actually see the barrel assembly start to rotate. It's kind of cool, actually, because it's not something I've ever seen before. Normally, if something in the slide starts to visibly rotate when the action moves, Bad Things are happening.

It came with 2 17 round magazines, a Kalifornia certified lock, a couple of bore brushes, the manual, and a solvent bottle. The warranty information pamphlet in this nice, thick, plastic holder. It also came with this little blue plastic disk that is either a large shot glass or a cookie cutter. I haven't quite decided which yet.

I got it for $479.97 plus tax at Cheaper Than Dirt in Fort Worth. They only got 2 on Wednesday, and I took the first one. The had one remaining as of 11:45 a.m. CDT. Bachman Pawn in Dallas has them for $499.99. They only have a few available, and I don't know what their sales have been like, but they had them available this morning.

WillBrayjr
September 16, 2005, 01:52 PM
Congrats on your purchase. That's not a bad price for a Beretta :cool:

shield20
September 16, 2005, 02:10 PM
How is the trigger pull? Is there alot of a creep in the SA mode?

alamo
September 16, 2005, 02:23 PM
Nice looking:

http://www.beretta.com/index.aspx?m=74&idc=2&ids=57

Wynterbourne
September 16, 2005, 03:11 PM
How is the trigger pull? Is there alot of a creep in the SA mode?

Hardly any that I noticed, but I could still be in the 'infatuated with my new purchase' stage. I'm going to play with it some more, and yes I did mean it that way, when I get off and go home. Hopefully I'll be able to give a little more objective view. Also, I'll get to take a look at the internals, which I'm -seriously- interested in.

Doc Hardball
September 16, 2005, 06:38 PM
That is a nice looking pistol.

Will have to keep my eyes open for one in my area.

MatchGrade
September 16, 2005, 06:39 PM
Rub it in why don't you.

Wynterbourne
September 16, 2005, 07:32 PM
Bachman Pawn and Gun - (214) 351-3628

He has some available in Dallas, TX for $499.99. He occasionally does some auctions on Guns America. I also know that they have sold and shipped to out of state clients from their retail shop. Give him a call, he's always treated me well.

old_ironsights
September 16, 2005, 08:38 PM
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and I congratulate you on getting the weapon you wanted. http://www.beretta.com/dati/ContentManager/images/Dettagli%20Pistole/Px4storm_dett18.jpgIt's a bit reminiscent of the CZ-G2000.
http://world.guns.ru/handguns/cz-g2000.jpg

CarbineCaleb
September 16, 2005, 09:27 PM
$500 is a bahgain for a Beretta - hope she shoots as good as she looks for you! :cool:

wwsnyder
September 16, 2005, 09:29 PM
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a288/wwsnyder/P97D.jpg

I think it looks a little like a Ruger.

fignozzle
September 16, 2005, 09:54 PM
Congrats on your new purchase. I'd sure be interested in a range report. The CX4 carbine is on my short list, and if the mags are interchangeable (as I assume), that would be a nice combo.

Wynterbourne
September 16, 2005, 11:08 PM
if the mags are interchangeable

Currently, they are not interchangeable. Beretta is releasing a mag well adapter that will enable the CX4 to take PX4 magazines. Ultimately, they will add a version of the carbine that is designed to be completely interchangeable with the PX4.

I'd sure be interested in a range report.

I'm hoping to make it to the range tomorrow. It just depends on what the cash flow looks like.

Wynterbourne
September 17, 2005, 01:36 AM
DISCLAIMER: I have never actually owned a polymer pistol. This includes Glocks, Sigmas, or anything else that might have been made by Tupperware. Please take that into account when reading.

I would also like to apologize for any grammatical or spelling errors. I've been up for almost 20 hours at this point without a single drop of caffeine. I'm bloody tired. If you have issues with that, you can cope.

Ok, I'm home and it's time to actually take a closer look at my new PX4.

The fit and finish are both very nice. I don't really know how to describe it. Upon a cursory inspection, everything seems to be put together well. I was able to produce some slide rattle at the very front of the slide by shaking it extremely hard.

I wanted to check for magazine rattle, so I loaded up one of the magazines with about a dozen snap caps. There's no rattle from the magazine, no matter how hard you shake it. When clearing the snap cap from the chamber I found that the magazine does not lock back without a magazine in place, unless you elect to lift up on the slide stop.

One thing about those magazines. Characteristic of the Beretta's that I have had the opportunity to play with, you HAVE to put these into position with a little force. It's not excessive, but you have to put positive pressure on the bottom of the magazine to make sure it locks into place. I've found myself doing the 'movie slam' to make sure they're in place.

Ejecting the magazine is something else entirely. Not only are these suckers 'drop free', they're freaking spring loaded. I kid you not, I inverted the weapon and pressed the magazine release. The magazine was loaded with 10 snap caps. The bloody magazine shot up 2.5-3 inches.

While looking at the exterior of the weapon I find that Beretta is extremely proud of the serial number. On the bottom of the accessory rail is a silver plate, where the serial number is etched. The serial number is also colored black for high visibility.

Additionally, the serial number is also located on the barrel itself. I find this somewhat odd, and am honestly not sure I like it. I keep wondering if replacement barrels will have to be etched with the serial number before they send them out.

And if two locations wasn't enough, they put another copy of the serial number on the slide directly beneath the ejector port as well.

The exterior of the weapon itself could almost be a freaking billboard. Let's see what we have on here.

On the right side of the weapon:

* Beretta Logo
* Two PX4 Logo's
* Warning to inspect the chamber to see if the weapon is loaded.
* Warning that the weapon will fire without a magazine.
* Serial Number
* Warning to read the manual before use.

On the left side of the weapon:

* Two Beretta Logo's
* PX4 Logo
* Notification that the weapon is under patent.
* The name of the company that holds said patent.
* Notification that the weapon was made in Italy.
* The name of the U.S. Subsidiary, and the city where they are located.

The controls are easy to access. My hands are somewhat smallish, but I can reach the slide stop without adjustment. A friend of mine with much larger hands found that it wasn't too small for him to manipulate easily. However, if you have large hands you might want to look into the large sized backstrap.

The magazine release takes a little bit of adjustment, a slight shift of my hand for me to depress, but the safety is in just the right position. The safety is kind of odd, though. I noted that it takes more force to deactivate the safety than to put the weapon on safe. I mean, it's highly unlikely that you'll ever put it on, or take it off, safety unintentionally. But it does take a measurably higher amount of force to take the weapon off safety.

Breaking down the weapon is simple. Remove the magazine and make sure the weapon is unloaded. Make sure the safety is on. In front of the trigger guard, on either side of the weapon, are small levers. Grab the levers with your thumb and forefinger and pull down. Move the slide forward off of the weapon. Once you've gotten the slide off, give the cam at the end of the guide rod a little forward pressure and it lifts right off.

I was suprised to find that the slide situates itself on two tiny little guide rails. Maybe I'm spoiled, but I like the idea of having 2 LONG slide rails for everything to ride on. I'm sure it works fine, but I have to admit I was just a tad disappointed.

The internals are extremely simplistic. You'll have to see them to know what I mean. I did find that the mechanism that holds the slide in place is actually locking into a small crossbar on the cam for the barrel. It seemed like an interesting arrangement.

Let me tell you right now, if you ever get one of these suckers, putting it back together can be a stone cold pain in the assets. You have to align that barrel up -just right-. And by 'lining up', I mean the axial rotation. Then you have to give the cam just enough pressure to get into JUST the right position. Once you get that into place it's just a matter of moving the slide back into position.

Now, by this point I've racked the slide about 3 dozen times, and have disassembled/reassembled the weapon 5 seperate times. The only thing I REALLY don't like is the fact that the barrel assembly is showing a little contact wear already. It's a minor thing, but I haven't even fired it yet. I wonder what the assembly is going to look like after 500 rounds or so.

The 'Luminova' coating on the sights is somewhat cool. Yes, I know it's just a glow in the dark paint. But you know, I've never really used night sights, so I think it's kind of fun. It's not going to work from dim lighting, but I found that hitting it with a 10 second burst from a 3-D Maglite, or being in a well lit room, gave me moderate night sight capacity for about 10 minutes.

All in all I'm extremely pleased. It feels good, it points good, and seems extremely well constructed. The test is going to be how it feels when I shoot it.

Lucky 7
September 17, 2005, 06:57 PM
Fellow BE lover here and was wondering if the transition from the all-steel beuty was difficult w/ the much lighter and small Beretta. I was looking a PX4 myself and was wondering what u thought in that way of thinking.

Semper Fi!
-L7

Ozzieman
September 17, 2005, 08:55 PM
The barrel on yours works like the cougar that I have.
There must be some king of slight delay in an auto loader before the slide starts to move away from the breach of the gun.
The 1911 the slide moves back with the barrel still locked, when it has reached some where around 1/4 inch the rear of the barrel moves slightly downward and this unlockes the barrel from the slide alowing the slide to seperate from the barrel and complete the cycle.
In yours like the cougar the barrel and slide move back togther for about 1/4 of an inch but stay locked togther, in this process the barrel rotates about 10 degrees this unlockes the barrel from the slide and then the slide continues backward with out the barrel ejecting the shell and reloading, the same process is repeated and the barrel rotates in the slide locking the barrel to the slide.
The reasion for this delay is to give time for the bullet to move down the barrel and let the pressure drop somewhat before the barrel and slide come apart and pull the case from the barrel.
I dont know if the Beretta is any better than any other desighn but there reasion is that the barrel always stays straight in line with the slide.
Dont know if I beleave that or not, but my cougar works flawlessly and I will be picking up a PX4 soon.

JohnKSa
September 17, 2005, 09:53 PM
I was suprised to find that the slide situates itself on two tiny little guide rails. I suspect that the stresses on the slide & rails are very different in a rotating barrel gun than in a tilting barrel design. Perhaps that accounts for the smaller guide rails.

Wynterbourne
September 17, 2005, 10:56 PM
I was looking a PX4 myself and was wondering what u thought in that way of thinking.

Honestly, I'm not sure. I haven't had the opportunity to fire it yet. However...

The grip width is very similar to my Baby Eagle, though the grip length is a bit longer. The trigger, though somewhat heavier than my Baby Eagle, is still very easy to pull. I tried dry firing both side by side and for some reason I get less motion on the tip of the weapon when I'm handling the PX4 than the Baby Eagle.

The overall width of the weapon is wider than the Baby Eagle, but not by much. The actual width listed includes the safety. Getting the low profile safety and slide stop is supposed to decrease the OAW of the weapon by about 1/8th of an inch. This puts the width of the weapon VERY close to the Baby Eagle.

My concern is adapting to the recoil. The Baby Eagle is 40 ounces unloaded while the PX4 is right at 27 ounces. But I've heard fantastic things about the rotating barrel design. Estimates state that it, and the lower bore axis, decrease felt recoil by about 30%. And the range reports indicate that it's capable of amazing accuracy.

I'll know more once I get to the range, but I feel it's got some serious potential.

EIGHTYDUECE
September 18, 2005, 12:35 AM
I fondled one at a gunshow today and was very impressed. I thought it felt very nice in the hand and I beleive it will make a very good CCW pistol for sure.

It will definately give the Glock 19 a run for the money in the perfect all around size do it all carry/range gun.

Congrats

n3twrkm4n
September 19, 2005, 07:31 AM
looks like a great gun and congrats on the 'new born'... heh

I was looking to pick up a 9mm after I purchased my XD in .40... maybe I'll look into the PX4 I like how Beretta took the modularity of the U22 Neos and put it in a more powerful calibre.

The modularity coming from the grips, mag release and the like. Seems a little odd to hold though, maybe I'll find someone with it so I can fondle it for a little while.

progunner1957
September 19, 2005, 12:59 PM
I just went to Beretta's website - it says that at present the XP4 is "for law enforcemennt only."

WHY do they do that... "feces??" Why aren't the rest of us worthy of buying their exhalted pistol? :barf: :barf:

That snobbery really gives me a case of the [email protected] Same as what Colt did with the AR15. "Big Brother" can buy them, but not we pee-ons. :barf: :barf:

Wynterbourne
September 19, 2005, 01:38 PM
I just went to Beretta's website - it says that at present the XP4 is "for law enforcemennt only."

They're not doing that anymore, they just haven't updated the website yet.

They WERE LEO only up until this week. They're reassigning some of the LEO models to civilian sales in preparation for the public launch. I know a NUMBER of non-LEO types, such as myself, who have purchased the PX4.