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View Full Version : What rifle is this???


Goober
November 6, 2004, 04:31 PM
My grand dad gave it to me 4 years ago. I just put it in the gun safe and cleaned it once a year and never fired it. My software for my dig camra is somewhere and i will post pics asap.

Here is what is stamped barrel.
cal .30 06
Mod 98
3237ff

on the bolt
8433 L

under the gun on the mag that is permanet (load from the top)
3237

It is a bolt action with a peap sight. The saftey is on the bolt right infront of the sight. So when the saftey is up you can not aim or shot. Firing is to the left and all the way right it does nothing. There is no maker stamped on it like my win 30-30 or my rem mod 700 270 ect ect.
I asome it is a milatry rifle sence there is no make on it.

He told me he got it in WWII but he was old and you know how they can ramble so i never got the rest of the storie and he past away.

any kinda of help would be aprishated.

TheBluesMan
November 6, 2004, 05:24 PM
I don't know much about old rifles, but it sounds like a Mauser to me.

Does it look like this?
http://users.adelphia.net/~jcmdjm/images/98mauser.jpg

I'm going to move this thread over to Harley Nolden's Institute for Firearms Research. Harley or one of the other experts over there will certainly be able to help you out with this.

Goober
November 6, 2004, 05:35 PM
Not realy. The stock does not go that far up the barrel. There rear sight is right over the rear of the bolt. The front sight at the end of the barrel is open to the weather.

Jim Watson
November 6, 2004, 05:42 PM
Most likely it is a Model 98 Mauser that has been sporterized. The barrel and stock have been replaced (or the original stock remodelled) and the sights changed to peep and bead. Nothing is left from the original military rifle except the action.

World War II German weapons have code markings that they used for bookkeeping meant to disguise where the guns were actually made. Many other sporterized military rifles had the national markings removed.

Goober
November 6, 2004, 05:51 PM
Wont there be a mount on the barrel for the old sight.

Also there is a bcd and 43 on the top of the barrel.

Goober
November 7, 2004, 12:19 AM
here are the pics i said i would post.

Any ideas???

Goober
November 7, 2004, 02:27 AM
more pics.

http://www.ls1camaro.net/freehosting/under%20mag.JPG
http://www.ls1camaro.net/freehosting/top%20barrel.JPG
http://www.ls1camaro.net/freehosting/top%20action.JPG
http://www.ls1camaro.net/freehosting/side%20action.jpg
http://www.ls1camaro.net/freehosting/left%20side.JPG

Mike Irwin
November 7, 2004, 02:18 PM
A post-war sporterization job done to a typical K98k Mauser rifle that was made during World War II.

BCA is the manufacturer's code. Not sure what it stands for.

The rear sight is either a Lyman or Redfield, and was added as part of the sporterization.

The .30-06 marking was added at the time the rifle was rechambered from 8x57 Mauser.

You're not seeing the old sight mount on the barrel because the barrel was replaced as part of the sporterization process. The 8mm barrel is too large for .308-dia. bullets.

Jim Watson
November 7, 2004, 11:19 PM
BCD is the German WW II code for the Gustloff Company, Weimar Works, Weimar, Germany; 43 is the year made, 1943; Mod 98 is the year designed, 1898; 3237 is the serial number.

Goober
November 8, 2004, 02:29 AM
Thanks guy. Guess my grand dad had it rebarreld after the war or he picked it up that way during the war(not likly because of metal shortage) Now i have to see if i can find the old barrel.

Archie
November 10, 2004, 05:35 PM
Goober, the barrel has probably been replaced from the way it's marked.

Take a .30 caliber bullet and see if it will fit in the muzzle. If it stops where the bullet is full sized, the barrel is right for .30-06. That is a nice, sporterized hunting rifle, but no more. Except for the value of it being your Granddaddy's.

Use it to honor your honored Grandfather. Take it out and shoot a deer. Then, eat the deer. Give some to Grand dad if he's still around.

It is, as said, a 98 Mauser action redone. The bolt action by which all others are measured, even after 106 years.