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hominy
October 23, 2004, 02:03 PM
I have what appears to be a bolt action, magazine fed, military rifle. On the left hand side of the receiver it is stamped Cal 7.52. On the right hand side of the barrel, at the muzzle it is marked " C.A.I. ST. , VT " Beneath that writing, is " M-16 Spain .308 ". These markings appear to be etched in some manner. At the top of the receiver is a stamp consisting of a bundle of fasces, overlaid by a sword, point down, both items arranged in an X shape. The wood is dark stained, consisting of two pieces. There is a muzzle band with bayonet lug, and another band, approximately half the distance to the breech, with a sling swivel on the left hand side. The matching staple is 2 inches from the steel butt plate, also on the left side.
I would like to know what make or type rifle this is, who made it, and an approximate date of manufacture. I would also like to know more about the caliber of this rifle. Thanks

Paul B.
October 23, 2004, 02:22 PM
Sounds to me like you have a 1916 Oviedo Mauser made in Spain, originally a 7x57 that was converted to 7.62 NATO/.308 Win. The design is most likely the 1893 Mauser. You can confirm this by removing the bolt and looking at the bolt face. If it's flat, and the rifle cocks on the closing strock, it's an 1893. If it coks on the cloasing, it's an 1898 mauser, which would be the more preferable of the two.
Paul B.

hominy
October 23, 2004, 02:29 PM
Thank you..The bolt cocks on closing, the bolt face is recessed for the cartridge, and has the ejector protruding on the right sideand some other, unknown lug type part on the left. Thanks for the help

Paul B.
October 24, 2004, 04:18 PM
OOPS! That cocks on closing for the 98 Mauser should be cocks on the opening stroke. :o My bad. :( Sounds to me like you have an 1893 Mauser.
Paul B.

hominy
October 25, 2004, 09:35 PM
Thanks for the help, now I know what it is, maybe I'll shot it .

dfaugh
November 4, 2004, 07:18 PM
Its the 1893 action, and is not nearly as strong as the later 1898 version.(I believe at one time both were converted. (The converted 93s were also called FR-7s and the later ones FR-8s..I think I'd have to look it up.) It was designed for relatively low pressure loadings. It lacks some of the safety features of the 1898 type action, and the metallurgy wasn't as good. The original NATO .308 (and I think current) was OK(slightly lower pressure than commercial loadings), but be careful with anything else. Have a gunsmith check it out carefullybefore you fire it!