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Old December 23, 2001, 10:52 AM   #1
Stoli&Cranberry
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Which shotgun?

I never owned a shotgun before and I wish to buy one for clay shooting, trap, skeet. What kind of shotgun am I looking for? Length? What gauge? I am not looking for the best shotgun, just an inexpensive, yet reliable one for a beginning shotgunner.

Thanks for your opinions,

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Old December 23, 2001, 11:47 AM   #2
Kingcreek
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I bought a Beretta for the same reasons last spring. I got the NIB but discontinued 390 Sporting model for just over $500 but the 391 is available for a few more dubloons. You can find a Remington 1100 for less. 26" or 28" barrel is pretty typical 'round these parts. O/U double barrel guns are popular too but cost as much as 2x or more than the named semi-autos. Used guns are not hard to find either.
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Old December 23, 2001, 11:57 AM   #3
K80Geoff
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A good starting point would be the Beretta 390 series or the Remington 1100. Both have a great Reputation and are reliable enough to allow you to shoot without problems.

I suggest a 28" barrel with choke tubes, this will be adequate for all the clay games and for hunting.

They are also relatively easy to sell if you decide you want something better.

Remember no one stays with the first gun they purchase if they get serious about Skeet , Trap or Sporting.
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Old December 23, 2001, 12:10 PM   #4
Dave McC
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Good input from the guys. I suggest hanging around your local range and asking folks about their shotguns. You might even get to try out a shotgun for a shot or two.

Reliability is excellent with the named guns thus far, add a Remington 870 to your list. The most popular pump gun ever made. They run less than the others mentioned also. For versatility, get a 12 gauge.

HTH...
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Old December 23, 2001, 06:31 PM   #5
Stoli&Cranberry
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Thanks for the input! But now I have a choice of either getting an autoloader or pump-action. Is this there a specific need to have one over the other or is it just personal preference?
I am considering the Remington 870 pump action basically because it is less expensive, but would it be versatile enough?

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Old December 23, 2001, 07:03 PM   #6
Dave McC
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VERSATILE??!!....

I've a battery of 870s that covers the whole spectrum, but I could do it with one and a coupla barrels.That's mice to moose to Mastodon to Home Defense to clay sports. ALL clay sports.

Warning, 870s are addicting.

The downside of a pump is it may be a trifle slower on fast repeat shots, tho Herb Parsons and Rudy Etchen might disagree.

One has to be quick for trap doubles with a pump, or true pairs on a sporting course, but practice and a smooth pumper like an 870 will suffice. Pull up 10 trapshooters, 9 of them will own 870s, tho they may be shooting other guns.

For "Serious" use, 870s are the standard by which all other shotguns are judged.BTE, I can traverse fire 00 in a stock 870 on 5 targets at up to 25 yards with good hits in under 5 seconds. You can too, with a bit of practice.

For Trap, several 870 records still hold for straights, including Etchen's 1005 bird string.
According to Rudy, recently deceased, the only thing he couldn't do with an 870 was wear it out.

One of the shorter versions, including the Turkey vartiant, can serve for ANYTHING. Like most compromises, it may not perform quite as well as a more specialized tool, but it will perform.

All round use, a 28", Remchoked bbled 870 with a short bbl for deer, "Serious" use, and things like quail and grouse will set you back less than $400, last generations with care, and will do anything you need to have it doing.

The Archives here have paeans of praise for the 870, and just about all of it is true....
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