The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old May 9, 2001, 09:54 AM   #1
Hip's Ax
Junior Member
 
Join Date: September 17, 2000
Posts: 10
Greetings,
I have a Hornady Hand Held Priming Tool, I have been using it for about a year and just last night I noticed a problem. I am currently loading Lake City brass in .223 (5.56mm) for my nation match AR. Of course with a military semi auto, slam fires are always a concern. For this reason I am careful to uniform the primer pockets so as to ward off any high primers. I made a few batches of primed brass and just before loading I make a careful inspection of primer height for safety. I was finding a few flush primers and a very few high primers. I assumed that I had not uniformed the primer pockets correctly, so on my next batch, I was very careful to perform this operation correctly. Last night while priming this brass, I was finding that I had a really high percentage of high and flush primers. In a attempt to find the reason, I put the primed brass through my press using the primer arm, almost all of the primers went in a little further resulting in nicely seated primers a few thousandths below the rim. Is the fact that I am using Redding shell holders in my Hornady priming tool to blame? Would purchasing a set of Hornady shell holders remedy the problem? I really like the tool, it is very convenient to be able to prime my brass away from the reloading bench. Thank You For Your Time.

__________________
"Where the Hell did that 8 come from!!?"
Hip's Ax is offline  
Old May 9, 2001, 11:07 PM   #2
dick w. holliday
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 13, 2001
Location: NC
Posts: 589
i'm not familiar with the tool you're describing but it sounds like a shellholder problem to me..in regard to slamfires in the AR....i've shot almost exclusively reloads in my various AR's since 76 and have never had a slamfire...maybe i'm just lucky...primers usually seat flush or a little below....primer pockets are swaged w/RCBS tool (Although i was tempted today to order a Dillon just to see if it is as great as everybody says). I also shoot 223 in a Norinco 84S 223 and while reading up on AK's i heard that these in 223 would slamfire...sure enough i didn't even get through my first mag during sight in before the rifle was speaking in the unknown tongue "Full Auto" doubletaps....Dick
dick w. holliday is offline  
Old May 10, 2001, 05:01 AM   #3
yankytrash
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 17, 2001
Location: Farnham, Va
Posts: 2,183
I think you're on the right track.

I personally use Lee hand primers and my problem is just the opposite - I have to watch that my primers don't go too deep.

I'm not familiar with the RCBS, but if that's an extra shell holder, maybe you could grind the bottom of it down do get the desired result. The shell holders for my Lee are flat.
yankytrash is offline  
Old May 10, 2001, 12:16 PM   #4
Hip's Ax
Junior Member
 
Join Date: September 17, 2000
Posts: 10
Thanks folks, I got an answer back from Hornady and they feel that the installation rod is to blame. They are going to make up a longer one and I'll have it in a week or so. I have the Dillon swager and while I've never tried the RCBS, I couldn't see anything as pleasant to use as the Dillon. Once you get going it is frightening how fast you can blow through a pile of brass, definitly worth the money in my book. Not sure what you mean by putting the primer in too deep, the primer is suppose to be pressed in snug against the bottom of the pocket, perhaps you meant crushing the primer instead. Once again, thank you for your replies.
Hip's Ax is offline  
Old May 10, 2001, 08:28 PM   #5
yankytrash
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 17, 2001
Location: Farnham, Va
Posts: 2,183
In my experience, primers should always be as flush as possible. Less wear on firing pins. A primer pocket brush can play hell on a pocket's depth after 15 reloads.
They actually make (or made?) a tool to check for flushness of primers. A bit of a ripoff if you ask me - it's just a flat piece of metal.
yankytrash is offline  
Old May 10, 2001, 09:50 PM   #6
Big Bunny
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 9, 1999
Location: New South Wales - Australia
Posts: 605
There must be a reason for a longer rod. Slop in the shellholder or cup...or a metal fatigue problem. I had a fault on my LEE Autoprime and it was upgraded and the item replaced free of charge -they are really great people at LEE.
I have never used the Hornady priming tool, but the RCBS is too easy to damage and slow to change sizes IMHO.

An index finger is the best "deapth gauge" YT ! Cheaper too, but good luck to the entrepreneur involved!

A primer should be always "felt in" to the maximum, by hand is best -and Lee Autos are excellent for this without crushing or marking. Many of mine are well UNDER the case-head level and the 'extra wear on the primer pocket' worries me not one iota....malfunctions though do -a lot!

I have had only one primer problem in last 10 years from my reloads(but ex-mil ammo [in M95 Steyr] made in c1936 had a few though)and that solitary one was due to a spongy/badly mixed Winchester compression formed plastic hull in a 12GA hunting shotshell, allowing too much "flex" when hit by pin in a M120.Crow was alerted and missed.
__________________
Bad boys, bad boys...watcha goin' to do - watcha goin' to do when they come for YOU ?!
Big Bunny is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10667 seconds with 7 queries