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Old March 22, 2001, 04:30 AM   #1
a-bolt
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newbie asking:

I have a browning abolt medallion in .30-06 for which I want to work up a variety of experimental loads. I ultimately want to shoot a grandslam, cor-loct and/or A-frame bullet in the 165 or 180 gr. range (depending on accuracy and experimentation of each). For use on deer and wild pigs in CA up to 300 yards.

Is there some step by step method to it? All the old timers at the range say I've got a dandy rifle and should work up an "accurate load" for it. Presently I've been content to load 150 gr FMJ practice rounds for it and punch paper. To hunt I just use 180 gr. Rem Cor-loct from Walmart but I think the old shooters are right and I want to expand my reloader abilities but I don't know quite how to go about it. My Sierra manual does not really tell how to do this.

Is there a website that details all this?



Many thanks for your help.
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Old March 22, 2001, 04:31 AM   #2
a-bolt
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deals: ammo components on the net?

bullet components: any of you have a bead on whose cheapest for a west coast (CA) person to order from? Are they on the net? I reload 9mm, .45ACP, .30 rifles and .38/.357 ---> I mostly want cheap copper jacketed stuff.

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Old March 22, 2001, 04:33 AM   #3
a-bolt
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9mm bullet seated in a .38 case?

My sierra manual mentioned a cowboy action configuration which uses a 124gr 9mm (auto) LRN bullet seated in a .38 spcl case. Is that crazy or can the be done? I did not think you could mix auto bullets and revolver ones since they have slight differences.

What gives?
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Old March 22, 2001, 04:43 AM   #4
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Duh!! Sorry folks. I meant to post to the main board and did not know i was in my own msg thread. dbl. Duh.

Administrator: would you kindly delete the messages above except the one starting my thread?

thanks.
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Old March 22, 2001, 11:16 AM   #5
labgrade
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Acuracy doesn't neccessarily equate to velocity, so your most accurate well might not be your fastest.

Sierra does a pretty good job of indicating what their "accuracy" & "hunting" load is for any given bullet weight. Sometimes they are the same. Worth a look.

Usually, whatever powder that gives best loading density (fills the case) works best for uniform pressures & accuracy.

Prep'ing your brass can have good results. Size the new brass, debur the flash hole from the inside, ream primer pockets, trim all cases to the same length & chamber/debur the mouth.

I'll start off with my bullets seated about .010" off the lands, work up a load of specific powder in 1/2 grain increments - starting about 10% below listed max through max. 5 rounds each. After shooting for groups, and always watching for pressure signs, compare what you got. Sometimes ya luck out. For "just hunting," I want something that stays within 1" at 100

To really start tweaking, I'll then do the 5 each bit with different seating depths, working towards the rifling first (longer OAL) in .005" increments.

Records are important so you don't lose track.

Something rarely mentioned is the technique off the bench. If your technique is haphazard, you will be the main weasel in the works rather than your different loadings.

If you want to get really squirrely, you can take case prep
to new levels by doing all the above, turning the necks, weighing cases, etc. For an off the rack rifle, I never bother.

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Old March 22, 2001, 12:32 PM   #6
stuckatwork
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To work up a load, you start your load from the bottom up. In other words, start with the minimum load listed for your powder/bullet combination. Myself, I do this in half grain increments. I'll load nine or ten like this to the max or a little above. When I find a load that gives the best group, then I start experimenting with seating depth, crimp, smaller increments of powder and so forth.

The real key to doing this is be consistant and take very good notes. Do not take any short cuts. Also, look around there are several very good books written about accuracy loads. I'm at work, (re: stuckatwork) and don't have any here that Ican recommend. They are out here.

Goodluck and let us know how you make out.



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Old March 24, 2001, 06:19 PM   #7
45Colt
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one other little simple idea

is to seat the bullet half way, then rotate the case 180 degrees and seat it the rest of the way. I cut 1 and 1/2 inches off my 25-06 groups with this method. Best, Walt
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Old March 25, 2001, 03:34 AM   #8
a-bolt
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thanks all of you.

I use a Lee RGB die which requires lubing cases. I hate that step and wonder if I should get a carbide rifel die set to skip this lube prep step. Can RGB die give me good accuracy or is it to cheasey? Its worked for me so far but... I was curious.

also,


stuck@work:

"When I find a load that gives the best group, then I start experimenting with seating depth, crimp, smaller increments of powder and so forth. "

Of these different steps what realative impact to each have on accuracy. i.e. can I focus on one step more than others and get 60% of optimal accuracy by say focusing on seating depth most or charge weight most? does this q: make sense?


Colt45:

" is to seat the bullet half way, then rotate the case 180 degrees and seat it the rest of the way. I cut 1 and 1/2 inches off my 25-06 groups with this method. Best, Walt "

Q: why does this rotation method work? do you know? I am just curious of the physics or mechanics involved here. I'll try this thanks.

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Old March 26, 2001, 01:05 PM   #9
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I develop my loads along the following criterion:
1. What is the optimum bullet weight and type for what I want to do?
2. What powder produces the best peak velocities with this bullet weight? Pick the powder with the best mix of case filling capacity and attainable velocity. I don't see much point in loading lighter. So many people do this and effectively turn their 7mm Remington Magnums into expensive, powder wasting 280's or 7mm-08's.
3. Pick whatever primers and cases I have on hand. Cases are sorted by brand.
4. Take a great deal of care in trimming all cases to a specified trim length to ensure good crimp.
5. For the first run, seat bullets incrementally deeper. What increments is up to you. I don't have a micrometer seater, so I go by 1/4,1/2 etc. turn of the seater die and then measure. Mark the ammo with the die measurement and the measured length.
6. 10rds per length increment with a given bullet. Clean between groups. Shoot the longest ones first, watching for pressure increases. I then measure all of my groups. Best group based on length gets the go-ahead for "mass production". I then crank out dozens of that load, and mark it in my book as a good load in that rifle.
7. Move on to another bullet or powder.
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Old March 26, 2001, 02:55 PM   #10
a-bolt
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poodle_shooter: awesome nick name.

i like your step by step there. it seems doable if i go by the numbers. sometimes it feels like a complicated thing but then i come back to it - i guess i like the challenge. thanks.
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