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Old February 15, 2001, 02:12 PM   #1
tooltime
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I would like to shoot cast bullets in some rifle calibers such as .45-70, .30-06, .30-30,.303 british, etc. Does anyone have a source for this type of load data. Most of my manuals do not include data for cast bullets.
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Old February 15, 2001, 02:24 PM   #2
Quantrill
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Cast Bullet Data

Lyman sells a reloading manual called "THE CAST BULLET HANDBOOK" that is all cast bullet loads. Lyman's regular reloading manual #47 also has cast bullet data in it. Quantrill
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Old February 15, 2001, 08:06 PM   #3
Southla1
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The Hodgoden #26 Manual has a section of loads for cast bullets, but it is not all that extensive. The Lyman sources that our friend Quantrill mentioned is about the best choice. RCBS had a cast bullet data book out also, but I do not know if it is still in print. It covers data for RCBS moulds but there is really not much difference between those and Lyman moulds.
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Old February 16, 2001, 01:39 AM   #4
dick w. holliday
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data

look at M.D. Smith's reloading pages at http://www.reloading ammo.com
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Old February 16, 2001, 03:08 PM   #5
Paul B.
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Southla1. The RCBS book has been out of print for several years now. I keep hoping they'll come out with a newer updated version, but so far I have heard nothing.
I have a copy of the book, so if you need something specific. I can pass it on. My biggest gripe with it is, like the second ed. of the Lyman book, they used all those faster burning powders like Unique and #2400. Those usually don't give the best results. The latest Lyman book has the best data of the two.
Fortunately, I've been casting long enough, that I have all three of the Lyman bullet casting books. I sure wish they'd reprint the first one. Mine has gotten so raggedy from use that it is starting to fall apart. It probably is the most interesting to read, and much of the data was sent in by shooters, who also recorded their comments on the loads. It is also surprising to see how many people used cast bullets for serious hunting, up to and including moose, some with the 30-30 yet.
If you find a copy in decent shape,get it. It's worth the price just for the reading.
Paul B.
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Old February 16, 2001, 04:14 PM   #6
sundog
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tooltime, what the others have said is true. BUT, there is an inherent problem loading cast for rifles. Many of the 'best' loads are not even listed anywhere. Aside from learning from the masters, one of the greatest ways to exchange this kind of never before published data is by sharing on the internet. All of this has to be tempered with safety, though. A novice handloader and shooter can get in over his head real fast. So if you do not have alot of experience stick with the books, especially the Lyman Cast Bullet Manual and the RCBS manual. Be aware too that the shooting properties of lead, even different alloys, in the same barrel will yield drastically different results in terms of pressure, velocity, and accuracy. Many who try cast for the first time run into dismal failure and give up. Some don't. You have to be persistent. Try to find someone who is already experienced and is having success. The best thing about shooting cast, especially if you roll your own, is you get to shoot more. If you do start casting you really won't save any money, just shoot more. sundog
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Old February 17, 2001, 06:04 PM   #7
Southla1
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Paul, I must have the older version or the RCBS book. It has powders such as 4895 for most of the rifle loads (22-250 30-06 etc.), but they are kind of light on the max loads in the 30-06 for example. I use 40-42 grains of 4895 with a cast Lyman 170 grain RN GC at right at 2300 fps and it shoots great with no leading. I am gonna guard that RCBS book like gold .
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Old February 17, 2001, 07:51 PM   #8
Quantrill
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Cast Bullets

I pulled out my RCBS "Cast Bullet Manual Number 1". Mine is a hardback small book but has 30-06 loads with 4895,3031 and 4064. It is dated 1986. My oldest Lyman "Cast Bullet Handbook" is a spiral bound small book that is dated 1973. It has all faster burning powders with Herco and 2400 being the slowest. The old NRA "Cast Bullets" book had several loads with the slower powder in one of the articles. The NRA just listed the bullet weights by group and gave approximate grainage rather than exact combinations. Quantrill
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Old February 18, 2001, 01:28 PM   #9
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There is also a section in Lee's Modern Reloading for determining appropriate cast bullet loads. It's a formula for doing so without using fast burning pistol powders.

Done properly, cast bullets can been driven virtually as fast and accurately as jacketed in most rifles. It takes experimentation and patience however.

If you are just getting into casting, I would say to stick with the lower velocity loads and use a gas checked type of bullet and a hard alloy. Also proper sizing is the key. Usually to the THROAT diameter not the groove diameter. Ideally, the throat diameter should be the same or slightly larger than the groove diameter.


Have Fun
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Old February 18, 2001, 03:31 PM   #10
Paul B.
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Southla1. Oops! You're right. I've standardized on my loads for various rifles, and haven't looked in that manual in a long time. I guess I got it confustigated with Lyman's #2 cast lead book. My apologies. I use the loads I've worked up that I've listed in my notebooks, so seldom refer to the amnuals anymore, unless I'm starting up with a new caliber.
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Old February 18, 2001, 06:36 PM   #11
Southla1
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Aw Paul don't apologize you did nothing wrong! I LIVE confustigated! I did get out my Lyman and RCBS book last nite and look em over during a bout of sleeplessness. My RCBS book is dated 1986 like Quantrill's. My Lyman cast bullet handbook is later and it does not give rifle powders, just the fast burning powders. My Lyman reloading book is ancient lol. and all it has is fast burning powders, for the cast bullets. Now I do NOT advocate this for the unexperienced loader but, it is possible to take a starting load of rifle powder (NOT really slow powders but rather powders such as 3031 4095 etc.) and reduce that starting load SLIGHTLY, it is around 2000 to 2200 fps that can be used for cast loads if they are cast hard and gaschecked.
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