The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Art of the Rifle: Bolt, Lever, and Pump Action

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old July 21, 2014, 12:23 PM   #1
Movian
Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2014
Location: VA
Posts: 15
Suggestions for Remington 700 stock

Hi! I just picked up my first rifle at a gun show at the weekend and picked it out with the help of a friend.

I ended up with a Remington 700 .270 with Iron sights for $350, I have already ordered my scope (Redfield Revenge 4-12x42mm - Opticsplanet.com) with rail, rings and a bipod.

what I am looking for now is to try and determine what stock to start saving for (I figure the stock I have now is usable till I can get something good). It currently has the factory synthetic stock (it sounds hollow when you tap it), which also doesn't support detachable magazines.

My friend told me to look around at stocks and I have been but I wanted to get some suggestions and opinions, I am looking at something for hunting / range use (currently 100 yards but will be moving next year and hopefully will have a longer range available). I like modern style "Tacticool" stocks but prefer functionality over aesthetics (although if I can get both I won't complain!) and I would like something that will last well and be rugged. I would LIKE to pay $200-$400 however the stocks that I have REALLY liked the look and features of so far all seem to be much more expensive such as the JAE 700, JP Advanced Modular Chassis System or the Accuracy International Chassis System....


all advice is appreciated!
Movian is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 12:52 PM   #2
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 5,579
Boyds

Recently, I've been stuck on Boyds. Their pricing is right and fits are great. The only real problem you might have with them, is too many choices ...

Be Safe !!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.
Pahoo is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 01:58 PM   #3
jmr40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 15, 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,947
Most tactical type stocks are going to be heavier than you want on a hunting rifle. A 270 is a great choice as a hunting rifle, but less so as a tactical rifle.

1st decide what you are really going to do with it. If you're a hunter I'd leave it as is or invest $600 into a lightweight McMillan Edge stock.

If you want a tactical rifle I'd trade it for a 308 made as a tactical rifle.
jmr40 is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 02:03 PM   #4
taylorce1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 18, 2005
Location: On the Santa Fe Trail
Posts: 5,456
McMillan Huters Edge would be my first choice for a hunting rifle in .270. Bell & Carlson Mountain Rifle ADL would be my second. Tactical stocks wouldn't even be a consideration on a hunting rifle, just too heavy and bulky unless your're going to be sitting in a blind of some sort with a tripod or rest to put the rifle on.
__________________
NRA Life Member
The Truth About Guns
taylorce1 is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 02:12 PM   #5
Movian
Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2014
Location: VA
Posts: 15
ok some great info here!

so the tactical stocks will be heavier and that will be important, I will be MOSTLY at the range with a little hunting but the hunting will still be in there so will try and keep that in consideration!

what about the JAE 700 that is kinda like a tactical stock but not at the same time (from what I can tell) (also the least expensive of my three examples).

Would that have the same weight problem (looks like its around 5 lb)? Is it worth saving up for that type of a stock?


I probably will be mostly shooting from prone (or shooting bench) with a bipod (even out hunting if I can) so that's a consideration too.

the stock my friend has is the "Bell and Carlson Medalist M40 Varmint/Tactical Rifle Stock Remington 700 BDL Short Action with Aluminum Bedding Block System Varmint Barrel Channel Synthetic"

So it seems like you guys would potentially recommend something similar?

that stock looks to be about 3.5 lbs... will the 1.5lb difference be that noticeable while hunting ?

Would this be a good investment? (I would need the long action of course).


JMR40 - I like the tactical LOOK if I could get it to look tactical (purely aesthetics) but keep the weight down I would be happy with that!


sorry if some of my questions seem obvious etc, but brand new to shooting and want to make sure the information I use is right

Last edited by Movian; July 21, 2014 at 02:23 PM.
Movian is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 02:57 PM   #6
taylorce1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 18, 2005
Location: On the Santa Fe Trail
Posts: 5,456
Your rifle will never look tactical, simply because you have a sporter barrel with sights on the rifle. It'll look like a monkey doing nasty things to a football if you try to add a tactical stock and to it. The barrel will never fill out the barrel channel on the stock and fit properly.

If you really want a tactical looking rifle you should have held off buying a rifle that wasn't what you wanted in the first place. It would have saved you money in the long run as now you have a rifle that will never be excatly as you want it unless you put a heavier contoru barrel on it. Put a decent quality barrel on it and you're looking at an extra $400-700 by the time you get done.

A Remington 700 in .270 should sell easily for $350 so you can get your money back. Take that money and put it towards a Savage or Howa rifle with a heavy barrel and buy a Boyd's Tacticool stock and you'll have close to what you want. Do what you want it's your money, but if it were me I'd shoot it as is since you want a tactical until you can't do any better with the rifle then start upgrading. Save the money that your going to spend on a rifle stock and get the rifle you want.
__________________
NRA Life Member
The Truth About Guns
taylorce1 is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 03:12 PM   #7
Movian
Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2014
Location: VA
Posts: 15
maybe I have gone off on a tangent, I like the 700 and it shoots great and I am upgrading functionality at the moment and was hoping to make it look a "Little" more tactical not 100% a tactical rifle, the rifle is what I want. Just trying to find the right stock, a nice blend of a little tactical with the rifle that I have so it looks "modern"...

does that make more sense ? ^_^
Movian is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 03:46 PM   #8
Mike / Tx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 8, 2000
Posts: 1,287
If you look over on Brownells, you can find the small screws that will replace those holes in your barrel when you remove the factory iron sights. They are pretty cheap, or if you have a nice local gun store around you might be able to talk them out of a few pretty cheap as well. You will hardly notice them being there, but they will keep junk from building up in the unfilled holes.

Boyds is a good place to start off. Myself, I don't worry about the "tactical" look or feel. I like something that "fits" more than anything else. IF it don't fit right you will never be as accurate with it until it does.

I also have a couple of laminates I picked up from Stocky's which do a great job. I think they were on sale for around $150 or so when I got them a couple of years back. One of them is a dark brown and tan, and the other is a light grey and black. I glass bedded the brown one and still have the other one in the closet.

All that said, if I were building up a rifle I wanted to look great, but shoot better, I would simply look here and be done with it,
Russo Rifle Stocks

Don't let that high dollar pretty stuff get to you on the home page. Look at the tabs and see what he can do for you. I was all dialed in to throw down on one, but my funds fell through and it never happened. I managed to find something however that would work, but it isn't what I wanted in the long run. If you want to know how well they work, do a search over on Long Range Hunting, and you will find quite a few rifles set up in them.

Hope that helps.
__________________
LAter,
Mike / TX
Mike / Tx is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 03:49 PM   #9
jmr40
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 15, 2008
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,947
Something like this might be a good compromise.

http://www.stockysstocks.com/servlet...dermess/Detail

They are about 30-32 oz and look a lot like some of the varmint/ target rifle stocks. Cost is around $250. They are a decent stock for someone not worried about weight. The laminates and traditional tactical stocks are much heavier.

Like Taylorce1 I really like the McMillan Edge or other true lightweights. Mine are about 22 oz and some made by other companies can be as light as 15-16 oz. But come with a $600 price tag. Anything under 1.5 lbs is going to cost that much.

You can put your rifle in one of these, but the barrel channel is made for heavier barrels. There will be a huge gap between barrel and stock. With the sporter barrel and irons would look awful.

http://www.stockysstocks.com/servlet...actical/Detail
jmr40 is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 05:48 PM   #10
taylorce1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 18, 2005
Location: On the Santa Fe Trail
Posts: 5,456
Just paint the stock you have with a faux GAP camo paint job if you want the tactical look. It'll save you a ton of money in the long run since all you seem to be is concerned with how it looks. Or spend $600 get a McMillan HTG, A3 Sporter, or Game Scout have them inlet for your choice of DBM that'll cost around a minimum of $300 with a magazine. By the time you do that you'll have close to $1K invested in upgrades you might as well spend another $1500 on a heavier contour barrel and better optics. Then you'll have nearly $3K in a Remington when you include the cost of your original rifle.

Me I'd paint it or sell it and buy a different tactical rifle.
__________________
NRA Life Member
The Truth About Guns
taylorce1 is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 06:23 PM   #11
emcon5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 10, 1999
Location: High Desert NV
Posts: 1,618
Quote:
It currently has the factory synthetic stock (it sounds hollow when you tap it), which also doesn't support detachable magazines.


It doesn't have a sling swivel stud in front?
emcon5 is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 06:59 PM   #12
Pahoo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 16, 2006
Location: IOWA
Posts: 5,579
The cheap ones, can be noisy !!!

Quote:
It currently has the factory synthetic stock (it sounds hollow when you tap it), which also doesn't support detachable magazines.
He's referring to the butt-end and yes, I refer to them as drums. Not the best for hunting and takes a bit of work to quiet them down. All that I have seen, have studs. .....

Be Safe !!!
__________________
'Fundamental truths' are easy to recognize because they are verified daily through simple observation and thus, require no testing.
Pahoo is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 07:10 PM   #13
emcon5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 10, 1999
Location: High Desert NV
Posts: 1,618
Ah, for some reason I read that as Bipod. No idea why.
emcon5 is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 07:36 PM   #14
Bultaco
Member
 
Join Date: September 25, 2013
Location: Western Co.
Posts: 64
It's your first rifle. Mount the scope, sight it in and spend your next $200 learning how to shoot. All the tacticool stuff is great to pose at the range with but as soon as you shoot it you will be exposed. Work on offhand shooting from 75 yds. out. learn to hold & control the rifle. Learn breathing & trigger press. The stock won't make you a better shot until you are a seasoned rifle shooter. Being good off the bench is only good for being good off the bench. Learn to shoot your rifle in the real world & you will end up being a better shot in the end.
Bultaco is offline  
Old July 21, 2014, 08:54 PM   #15
Movian
Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2014
Location: VA
Posts: 15
great advice, the main reason I would like to upgrade the stock is to A) get rid of the hollow sound and B) add the ability to use detachable mags and Z) to make it look nice

none of which are things that NEED to be done now (as mentioned I need to save up for the stock as I spent my extra money making sure I got a descent scope! Redfield Revenge 4-12x42mm ).

some great input!

hopefully my rail, rings, scope and, bipod arrive this coming weekend and I will see where I stand with things and can start practicing.

Also need to look into reloading so its cheaper FOR me to practice. but I think once I get $300 ish saved I will end up getting something like the Bell Carlson stocks mentioned.

then maybe in the future get a tactical .308 if I feel the need arising


Thanks!
Movian is offline  
Old July 22, 2014, 09:03 AM   #16
Sure Shot Mc Gee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2012
Posts: 2,047
If intending to buy a aftermarket stock. Boyd's Solid wood (walnut) is lighter in weight opposed to their laminate's. Not sure about composites. Heard they can go both ways. These days I would say just about any aftermarket stock is decent. Only major differences is in their appearance and how much your willing to pay. As for me. I think you bought a good rifle having a great caliber for your very first. FWIW: Its stock sounding hollow has little to do with its accuracy or appearance more for field carry purposes. Before changing its stock. Maybe consider slicking its trigger up some first. Consider installing a Timney or a Jewel see & feel something that does help make a difference in a rifles performance. Having a rifle that looks pretty doesn't often make a rifle shoot better. Just ask any one of these closeted rifle builders here whats the best way to improve what you already have in hand. I'm sure their quite willing to steer you in the right direction.
Sure Shot Mc Gee is offline  
Old July 22, 2014, 09:28 AM   #17
Movian
Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2014
Location: VA
Posts: 15
I think I got a good rifle too ^_^

the hollow sound is purely a mental thing, I will knock it or something and I will hear it and it just instinctivly makes me "feel" likes its cheap...

Completly in my head but something I would like to resolve

as mentioned the stock works and does what I need but would like detachable magazines which this current stock wont do.

(I know I will need to get a new assembly as well as a stock to get the magazines to work).


Perhaps there is one other thing you guys could help me with, trying to establish exactly what type of 700 I ended up with and possibly the date it was made, I tried looking up the manufacture date but I can't find the 2 digit code any where on the rifle barrel.... I can supply pictures if that helps, or should I make a new thread for this ?
Movian is offline  
Old July 22, 2014, 09:49 AM   #18
taylorce1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 18, 2005
Location: On the Santa Fe Trail
Posts: 5,456
If it has a matte finish sights and no floor plate of any kind with a synthetic stock it's an ADL model. These were Remington budget rifles in the 90's and early 2000's until the M710 came out and things started going down hill for the budget line rifles for Remington. Up until the recall you could pick up a new M700 ADL with a cheap Remington branded scope for $429 at Walmart, Dick's, or Sportsmans Warehouse around here. The most popular chambers for the ADL was .223 Rem, .243 Win, .270 Win, .308 Win, .30-06, and 7mm Rem Mag.

Get some expanding foam and take the recoil pad off of your stock and fill the butt. Once it cures trim off the excess and re-install your recoil pad. That will remedy you hollow sound of your stock. A lot cheaper than a new stock in the long run.
__________________
NRA Life Member
The Truth About Guns
taylorce1 is offline  
Old July 22, 2014, 10:12 AM   #19
Movian
Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2014
Location: VA
Posts: 15
Thanks!

so I now know its an ADL for future reference! I doubt I will be able to re sell the stock so the expanding foam sounds like a great idea for a short term solution to one problem (will still need to upgrade down the road for detachable mags).

Is there any way I can determine the year (again only really for my own edification)?

as mentioned it doesn't seem to have a 2 letter code that other sites seem to be using... just a serial number starting with E659****
Movian is offline  
Old July 22, 2014, 10:18 AM   #20
taylorce1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 18, 2005
Location: On the Santa Fe Trail
Posts: 5,456
Call Remington and give them your serial number and they can tell you the history. However, be prepared for a long wait as they are in the midst of a massive trigger recall. It might be best just to email their customer support.
__________________
NRA Life Member
The Truth About Guns
taylorce1 is offline  
Old July 22, 2014, 12:12 PM   #21
emcon5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 10, 1999
Location: High Desert NV
Posts: 1,618
The code should be on the barrel, forward of the action on the left side.
emcon5 is offline  
Old July 22, 2014, 12:21 PM   #22
Movian
Member
 
Join Date: July 21, 2014
Location: VA
Posts: 15
emcon5 - it should be there however after calling Remington I discovered my rifle was made in 1999 during a brief period where they were not stamping it on the barrel but were putting it on the box it was shipped in.

http://remingtonsociety.com/rsa/questions/barrelcodes

"(*) On 8/9/99, stopped stamping the barrels with the date code. They continued to mark the date code on the end flap of the shipping box. They resumed stamping the date code on the barrel on 10/1/01."

actually didn't take long at all as there is a separate call line for the trigger issue. I ended up calling as they don't have an e-mail any where on the Remington site.

At any rate my question is answered

Last edited by Movian; July 22, 2014 at 12:38 PM.
Movian is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.11144 seconds with 7 queries