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Old April 14, 2014, 07:21 PM   #1
gyvel
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New 3D gun

http://blog.solidconcepts.com/indust...ted-metal-gun/

I don't know of any good way to present this without it seeming like a "drive-by," but the whole concept of being able to reproduce any solid object, much less a gun, using a computer and 3D printer is almost unfathomable. This was science fiction less than 30 years ago.

The company that did it apparently has an FFL, and has approval from BATF for manufacturing firearms, The latest update in their blurb states that the 1911 copy they produced has now shot 1000 rounds with no problems, which is totally amazing.

They also imply that, using their technique, they can accurately reproduce parts as well, and, if I understand their statement correctly, would theoretically be able to make you a new part for your Mars pistol or Webley-Fosbery revolver.

Given this new technology, I am now wondering what new and insane regulations will be coming down the pike from BATF regarding manufacture of handguns.
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Old April 14, 2014, 08:32 PM   #2
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It is rather incredible. I wonder how much it would cost to make a part with this process.

It would be a true blessing in some situation where if is impossible to find an obsolete part. Although; I assume one would have to find at least one part for them to get the measurements and/or copy from to recreate the part.
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Old April 15, 2014, 12:56 AM   #3
RX-79G
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CNC can do the same. The limitation on making any part is the CAD file. Unless you also have a 3D scanner.
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Old April 15, 2014, 11:34 AM   #4
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With a project like that, I'm betting they have a 3d scanner as well. These things still intrigue me, and they seem to get better by the month. Who knows, maybe someday 3D printed guns, and other products, may just be the norm. It really just depends on how strong they can make the parts and whether ot not it is cheaper than the current methods/materials.
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Old April 15, 2014, 04:07 PM   #5
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The 3-D could also be produced using dimensioned detailed drawings. I bet that necessary drawings are around for the 1911. gunslinger
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Old April 15, 2014, 06:24 PM   #6
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I'd be happy if they would let me 'print' a magazine. (I'd even be willing to buy the magazine spring separately.) The price of magazines for common guns is sky high and for older out of production guns is insane. (IMhO).
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Old April 17, 2014, 10:18 AM   #7
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Quote:
Given this new technology, I am now wondering what new and insane regulations will be coming down the pike from BATF regarding manufacture of handguns.
As opposed to the old and insane regulations?

There should be no new regulations or LAWS about this. It is more than adequately covered under existing statutes.

However, that doesn't mean that someone won't try to use this tech as justification for further restrictions.

Under the law, its doesn't matter whether you hand file a gun out of a block of steel, make it in the traditional manner with human run machine tools, computer run machine tools (CNC machining) or use this new 3D printing (and laser sintering -per the article). No matter how it is made, how long it takes, how much human effort it takes, or how much it costs to do so, the law doesn't care.

All that matters under the law is that what is made meets the definition as a firearm, and YOU meet all the legal requirements to make it.

The problem with this new tech is that the boneheads in politics are going to be fed lies and distortions about what the tech is, and what it can do, and are going to be urged to pass new laws to prevent the "proliferation of gun violence" because they will represent this as a way for unregistered "ghost" guns to flood the nation.

The anti's are going to say that anyone with a couple hundred bucks will be able to get one of these "3D printers", (and they will make no further distinction) at WalMart, take it home, plug it in, push a button (click a mouse) and in a few hours(?) have a complete, working, unregistered and untraceable gun.

"That is, what we in the Royal Navy call, a lie."

It won't matter to them, of course. Even if you happen upon one of them who still has two brain cells and is able to recognize (and willing to admit) that such a situation does not and will not exist in the near future, they will still push for more laws, because it "could happen someday".

The fact that doing so (making a gun) without getting the FFL is breaking existing law won't matter to them. They need new laws to deal with this looming crisis!

The fact that anyone willing to break the law, will get a gun anyway, also won't matter to them. Anyone willing to use a 3D printer to make a gun in violation of existing laws will also be willing to buy a gun on the black market, in violation of existing laws.

Also, considering the article mentions how the machinery needed to print the gun costs more than a college education won't matter to the anti's. They's simply claim how in the future it will be cheap and readily available, unless they do something (pass new laws) NOW!

This version of the 3D Printer tech has wonderful possibilities, not just in the firearms field, but for any manufactured part, particularly "one-offs". The guy that needs a rear Sprague gear to finish the restoration of his 53 Desoto, but can't justify the (possibly) thousands it would cost in labor to have a machinist make one from scratch might find this tech just the ticket. Unless, of course, by (new) law, the tech is restricted, because someone could do something bad with it...
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Old April 17, 2014, 01:16 PM   #8
Bill DeShivs
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It's perfectly legal to manufacture a gun without an FFL.
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Old April 17, 2014, 03:53 PM   #9
gyvel
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Quote:
As opposed to the old and insane regulations?

There should be no new regulations or LAWS about this. It is more than adequately covered under existing statutes.

However, that doesn't mean that someone won't try to use this tech as justification for further restrictions.
And this is exactly what I fear is going to happen.
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