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Old March 8, 2014, 12:34 PM   #1
psalm7
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7.5

Is the 7.5 Turkish Mauser the same cartridge the same as a 7.5 Argintine ?
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Old March 8, 2014, 02:30 PM   #2
James K
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Yes, but the cartridge is usually called the 7.65mm, not 7.5mm. The 7.65 Belgian is also the same cartridge.

Jim
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Old March 8, 2014, 03:26 PM   #3
gyvel
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7.5 would be "7.5 Swiss" or "7.5 French."

The 7.65 "Turkish" is also known as 7.65 Belgian and 7.65 Argentine.

Original Turkish Mausers in 7.65 calibre have the distinction of being the only Mauser rifle made with a magazine cutoff and aren't that common as most were converted to 8x57 Mauser in the 30s.
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Old March 8, 2014, 04:16 PM   #4
psalm7
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It is 7.65 someone I work with was telling me about a rifle he found in his Fathers estste and wanted to sale it . It is a Turkish Maurser he says very clean I think he said 1905 marked and wanted $135 for it .
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Old March 8, 2014, 04:32 PM   #5
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It's easily worth that if it hasn't been chopped and/or sporterized.

Make sure it hasn't been converted to 8x57 before you try to shoot it. Also, if it is still in original calibre, see if the magazine cutoff device is still intact and operational. The Turk Mauser differs slightly in externally appearance by having a slight "belly" at the bottom of the magazine that protrudes below the level of the stock. The other distinguishing feature is the cutoff mechanism itself, which is visible from the right side just below the receiver. See attachment. (Although the photo is actually of a 1933 Ankara 8mm conversion, the mag cutoff is plainly visible.)

7.65 ammo, while not super common, is still available enough as many Argentine Mausers have been imported over the last several decades in that same calibre.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Turk..jpg (46.7 KB, 11 views)

Last edited by gyvel; March 8, 2014 at 04:41 PM.
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Old March 10, 2014, 09:05 PM   #6
James K
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7.65 Mauser (aka 7.65x53 or 7.65x54) was the first of the standard calibers offered by Mauser in their small caliber line of military rifles, followed by the 7mm (7x57) and 8mm (8x57). Mauser in the late 1880's did not have the commercial rights to the 8x57, since it was the German military caliber and Germany was using the Commission Rifle (Model 1888), which was not a Mauser product. So Mauser first offered their rifles in 7.65mm. Belgium was the first to adopt the new Mauser, in 1889, followed by Turkey in 1890 and Argentina in 1891. Spain first adopted the same rifle in 7.65mm, but opted out and instead chose the newer model 1893 in the new 7x57 caliber.

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