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Old February 11, 2014, 04:30 AM   #26
Keg
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Keg, in that video it was not just the shield that stopped the arrow. He hit that boar on the top of the scapula. Even without the shield, the scapula would have likely stopped the arrow. A proper shot into the vitals would have penetrated MUCH deeper.
I agree....I was just trying to find a video that would show how much tougher a big boar pig is compared to a whitetail....

Quote:
A good discussion of the shield:

http://www.thehighroad.org/archive/i...-572323.html&&
I did enjoy reading this discussion....
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Old February 11, 2014, 07:29 AM   #27
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The shield on a boar hog is not from fighting.

If you castrate a boar hog, the shield will slowly go away, the shield is caused by hormones in the hog.

Contact the outfitter you are going with and ask him what you asked here. He knows what works the best where he hunts.

Have your read on www.texasboars.com? Go there and read about the anatomy of hogs, it's different than deer.

I shoot a lot of hogs with a .222 as that is what I carry for a truck gun. Some consider the .222 a bit light.

If you watch hogs, they constantly moving, they do not stand around as deer do. Body shots work much better.
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Old February 11, 2014, 08:02 AM   #28
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I went ahead and called the outfitter last eve. Here is what I found out. He said the area that they hunt hogs is swampy and has los of thick underbrush. So they tell people to shoot them right behind the ear, so they drop immediately. I can see his point. If I were an outfitter, I suppose I wouldn't want to be crawling through the brush trying to find a hog either!
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Old February 11, 2014, 08:50 AM   #29
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I understand that. My son shot one that went in to the palmettos. If I had been packing a handgun, I would have went in after it. No way I was going on foot into waist high cover with a scoped rifle looking for a wounded hog. Bottom line, Jevyod, carry what you are most confident with. I'm sure that any rifle you have will take a hog. Been a lot of whitetail killed with .22lr in PA over the years. Hell, I had a gun shop owner tell me that a .22 won't kill a coyote, as he was looking a the 55 pound male on the tailgate of my truck. 75 yard head shot with a Norinco JW-15 in 22lr. So, enjoy your hunt. Kill as many as you can and bring back lots of fresh pork.
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Old February 11, 2014, 04:37 PM   #30
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I went ahead and called the outfitter last eve. Here is what I found out. He said the area that they hunt hogs is swampy and has los of thick underbrush. So they tell people to shoot them right behind the ear, so they drop immediately. I can see his point. If I were an outfitter, I suppose I wouldn't want to be crawling through the brush trying to find a hog either!
What county are you going to be hunting in?

As for the boar losing his shields if castrated, I've killed sows with calloused "shields" on them that were 1 - 1.75" thick in the state the OP is going to be hunting in. These pigs around here inhabit areas that are so thick visibility is measured in feet. Some areas you have to get on your hands and knees to get through or back out and find another way.

That said, they aren't bulletproof if you put the round where it is supposed to go. My .243 is my go to rifle for pigs when in a stand. I'm looking forward to putting an arrow in one too, just not in the shoulder area.
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Old February 11, 2014, 05:31 PM   #31
fdf
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As for the boar losing his shields if castrated, I've killed sows with calloused "shields" on them that were 1 - 1.75" thick in the state the OP is going to be hunting in.




You have some new information that the experts at Texas A&M have not been able to document. You should really document your findings and send them some pictures along with tissue samples to them.

Contact Texas A&M at Overton, TX with your findings, they will be excited at your new biological findings in female feral hogs. They will really be interested in cross gender hormonal genetics between male and female feral hogs.

Let us know what they have to say about the new break through of your knowledge. Can't wait to hear about it.

Dr. H. will be your primary person to contact.

Last edited by fdf; February 11, 2014 at 06:33 PM.
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Old February 11, 2014, 06:33 PM   #32
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It is in Allendale County.
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Old February 11, 2014, 08:13 PM   #33
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Well you are going in my stomping grounds. I lived in Hampton County until I joined the Navy. There are several good outfitters in that area and a couple of the guys I grew up with are guides and Grand American Coon breeders. For the areas you'll be in, carry the 35rem. I killed a trapped hog a couple weeks ago that went over 500lbs with a 30-30 with no issue. But do study the anotomy of hogs since they are different than a deer or such. Which outfit are you going with?
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Old February 11, 2014, 11:35 PM   #34
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I am going with Terry from Blackwater Hunting Services. You know the guy? I met him at the Great Outdoor Show and then spoke with him on the phone. He seems like a great guy.

Last edited by Jevyod; February 12, 2014 at 09:45 AM.
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Old February 12, 2014, 09:15 AM   #35
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You have some new information that the experts at Texas A&M have not been able to document. You should really document your findings and send them some pictures along with tissue samples to them.

Contact Texas A&M at Overton, TX with your findings, they will be excited at your new biological findings in female feral hogs. They will really be interested in cross gender hormonal genetics between male and female feral hogs.

Let us know what they have to say about the new break through of your knowledge. Can't wait to hear about it.

Dr. H. will be your primary person to contact.
Cool, tell them to head on over.

Funny you should mention T A&M, I had a professor in a college biology class tell us that cottonmouths didn't inhabit the state either, his degrees were from that school too. Didn't take long to prove him wrong. Maybe I should ask them about our alligator problem while I'm at it, same prof said we didn't have them either. Oh and tarpon and mantees, we don't ever see either of those, except we do.

Your Tejas brush country environment is completely different than this one is. Yes, you have thickets and dense brush, we have place that are so thick if your dog spends enough time in there it'll grow callouses on its shoulders.

Next big old sow we kill like that I'll put some pics up for you though.
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Old February 12, 2014, 11:41 AM   #36
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Bullet selection is key

A heavier bullet will hold up better.
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Old February 12, 2014, 12:44 PM   #37
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As for the boar losing his shields if castrated, I've killed sows with calloused "shields" on them that were 1 - 1.75" thick in the state the OP is going to be hunting in.
I'd like to see pictures of this as well. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof.

Of course, the shields are not callouses and mixing the terminology does nothing but promote confusion.
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Old February 12, 2014, 02:22 PM   #38
Saltydog235
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I'd like to see pictures of this as well. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof.

Of course, the shields are not callouses and mixing the terminology does nothing but promote confusion.
Be glad to as soon as we get a big old sow with them. You aren't going to see it on those 120-180 pigs but the big ones yes you will.
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Old February 12, 2014, 07:00 PM   #39
thallub
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Oklahoma has some well armored hogs. This sow had a shield of fat all over her body. Some of it came off with the skin.

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Old February 12, 2014, 09:34 PM   #40
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Here's an example of a hog with a 1 1/2 inch plate. This will stop an arrow. The hog was shot with a .50 caliber muzzleloader at about 40 yards and he dropped in his tracks. Gutted out at 208 lbs.

Use enough gun.
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File Type: jpg hunting november 2006 030.jpg (95.9 KB, 39 views)
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Old February 13, 2014, 11:28 AM   #41
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That's just fat. A shield is scar tissue from fighting.
Plenty of folks kill big boar hogs with .223 low behind the shoulder.
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Old February 13, 2014, 01:11 PM   #42
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Yep, that's a good picture of the so called "shield". The stuff looks like hard fat.
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Old February 13, 2014, 01:13 PM   #43
Double Naught Spy
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That's just fat. A shield is scar tissue from fighting.
You apparently haven't watched hogs fight. You would see that a large percentage of their attempts to wound their adversary are in the neck and low on the sides via upward thrusts. Strangely, no shield grows in these locations.

Also, if the shield was scar tissue, it is remarkable symmetrical and must have pigs being a bloody mess most of their lives. That just doesn't happen.
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Old February 13, 2014, 07:02 PM   #44
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A shield is scar tissue from fighting.
Totally false. A shield may help protect them from fighting but it is NOT the result of fighting.
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Old February 13, 2014, 07:25 PM   #45
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Doyle is right.

You can tell some of the guys on here have not killed/skinned a lot of hogs.
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Old February 13, 2014, 09:06 PM   #46
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I have to agree with the "fat and gristle" theory. No way a hog develops a shield from fighting..I don't know how anyone could come to such a conclusion. Just shoot them with any reasonable caliber and you will be successful. If you manage to break a front shoulder in the process, all the better to slow down one if they still have some life left in them.
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Old February 13, 2014, 09:42 PM   #47
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That's complete nonsense. That shield is developed by testosterone. I've killed big hogs where the shield was 3" thick and I can tell you with authority that it is NOT fat. You go right ahead and try to render that down. It's the consistency of pressed cardboard and will stop a lightly constructed bullet==I know 'cause I've done it. It will also eat an arrow. The last thing you'll see is the hog trotting off with $25 worth of carbon shaft and broadhead waving at you.....
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Old February 14, 2014, 05:18 AM   #48
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Testosterone huh?...that's a new one to me. Maybe I need some of that stuff to toughen up my old hide. With a 3" shield of tough callous on their sides, they must grow some really tough hogs in California.
Unfortunately I guess the hogs just aren't that tough in Texas. I shot hog number 370 yesterday on the land I manage...about a 150/160 lb. boar...and I think he must have just given up out of shame for his lack of testosterone/mojo. He managed to succumb to a lowly subsonic 9mm out of a suppressed Sig.
I leave all the boars over 100 lbs. for the coyotes, buzzards and whatever critter likes them. Generally one night is all it takes for them to disappear in pieces into the brush. I do often find a hide left over, or a large piece of one as I guess they are pretty tough to chew. Within 2 days max, the buzzards pick all that tasty testosterone bearing shield off of the hide.....they must have some large caliber beaks.

Last edited by Old Stony; February 14, 2014 at 07:44 AM.
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Old February 14, 2014, 08:29 AM   #49
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I've only taken three wild boars (2 in northern Calif and 1 in Penna) so I'm no expert. All were taken with my 30-30 Marlin at approx. 80 yards or so. First boar was shot low in the chest. The animal took off like a rabbit but toppled after about 50 yards. My bullet tore off the bottom half of the heart. Next two boars were shot in the head and dropped so fast that I thought I'd missed! I hunted with 170 grain Winchester Power Point ammo.

I suggest the head shot if you get a good steady rest aim.

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Old February 14, 2014, 09:13 AM   #50
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Hogs are not difficult to kill when shot right. They ain't rhinos nor are they plated with homogeneous tank armor. Sometimes hunt hogs on game plots and at feeders using a .233 and handloads. The 53 grain and 55 grain Barnes Triple Shock bullets penetrate the shield and the shoulder of big boar hogs.
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