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Old January 21, 2014, 01:19 PM   #1
Beezer
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Mitigating Rifle Recoil

I have a Remington 700 in 30-06 that was passed down to me. I was finally able to shoot it over the weekend and man does it kick.

For comparison, I shot a Savage 30-06, a .308 and a 22-250 as well. While those packed a punch, none seemed to pack the same wallop as the Remington.

I know that there are various pads that you can purchase that will reduce recoil, but I'm wondering if there are other methods for reducing recoil (like stance, technique, adding weight to the rifle, etc).

I feel like I'm holding the rifle securely in my shoulder, but I have a nice bruise. I'd really like to have this as a functional rifle, but its difficult for me to stay on target (now I involuntarily flinch prior to the shot) and its difficult to relocate my target quickly after the kick.

Any tips are appreciated.
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Old January 21, 2014, 01:45 PM   #2
taylorce1
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How does the stock compare on your Remington compare to your Savage rifles? Stock shape has a lot to do with felt recoil, and the design of your Remington stock might be the major problem. Even if you changed out the recoil pad it might not reduce the felt recoil enough for you to enjoy shooting the rifle.

A recoil pad like a PAST might be your best option without changing the stock. You wear the pad and it will distribute the recoil over a larger area of your shoulder. It will be a far cheaper option to allow you to shoot the rifle outside of a hunting situation, and in that situation you won't feel recoil at all.

Raising your shooting position at the bench to where you sit more upright (similar to standing) will help with the recoil. You can try building a tripod to shoot from so you can shoot standing up. Shooting from a standing position will allow your body to move better with recoil.
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Old January 21, 2014, 01:54 PM   #3
Brian Pfleuger
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A good recoil pad will do wonders.
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Old January 21, 2014, 01:56 PM   #4
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If you don't mind adding weight to the rifle, you could hollow out sections of the buttstock and slip in lead weights to help reduce felt recoil. Of course as others mentioned a recoil pad will help too.
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:01 PM   #5
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Taylor -
The Savage was not mine, but belonged to a friend. To be honest, I'm not sure how similar the two are in shape. I'll compare the two next time I have an opportunity.

My shooting position may be part of the problem. For the first few shots, I was seated at a bench, as opposed to a standing position, and those seemed to kick the most. I tried a few in a standing position and they seemed to be a little more manageable, but by then my shoulder was already hurting.

I'll check out the recoil pads.
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:02 PM   #6
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Dragline -
I'm a bit of a novice and the gun was passed down from my grandfather. How difficult is the hollowing of the stock?
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:02 PM   #7
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I installed a direct fit Limbsaver recoil pad on my Tikka T3 Lite and it made all the difference in the world when shooting from a bench. It didn't reduce the amount of recoil, no pad will, but it reduced the perceived recoil that my shoulder was getting. It essentially softens the contact area with your shoulder. It won't take the kick or ability to relocate the target after the shot, but you won't since in pain or flinch from the expected pain.
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:10 PM   #8
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Precision -
How difficult is the changing of recoil pads (removing the stock one and adding an aftermarket)?

Is there a difference between the attached pads vs. slip on pads?
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:10 PM   #9
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a recoil pad would work. a heavier jacket might help. If you're shooting 180/200 grain bullets, you could probably drop down to 150 grain and still be able to drop most deer/elk at reasonable distances, should you so desire.
Are you holding the rifle tight to your shoulder? I'm assuming so, but thought I'd ask anyhow.
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:21 PM   #10
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All solutions will either add length of pull(distance from the trigger to the butt) or weight. As a fairly new shooter I would either get a "Shooters Friend " slip on recoil pad or have a mercury recoil reducer installed. The Shooters Friend is a much better recoil reducer than the fitted limbsavers or other screw or glue on pads with the added benefit of not changing anything on the rifle.If you plan on hunting with the rifle you will not ever notice the recoil when hunting and hopefully not shooting as much as you do at the range.

Last edited by longranger; January 21, 2014 at 02:36 PM.
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:23 PM   #11
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Remove 2 screws that hold the factory pad/plate in place.
Put new pad on either using same screws or replacement screws that come with the new pad. It should literally take you less than 3 minutes.

Slip on vs direct fit...
A slip on will net you the same benefits as a direct fit, however, if you don't remove the factory pad, then your length of pull will be increased by the thickness of the new pad possibly making it where you can't get a good cheek weld for the scope without craining your neck forward.

The direct fit are only a few dollars more than the slip on and well worth it in my opinion as you don't have that eye-sore stuck on the back of your stock and don't have to worry about it loosening, getting a tear in it to where it won't stay on, etc...
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:32 PM   #12
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If the 30-06 has too much recoil why don't you trade the gun for a .243 or something? I've never shot a 30-06 that hurt. I have a model 700 .243 that I would swap you.
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:33 PM   #13
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You might have to go back to a 22 rifle, so you can work out that flinch.
A cushioned cheek pad helps...that you can buy from Brownells. Pull the rifle into your shoulder pocket firmly with your support hand, and your trigger hand with a slight rearward pull.

Walmart sells 3 different sized slip-on rubber recoil pads. I buy a Bag of Rags at an auto parts store, and stuff some rags under my shirt on my shoulder pocket. You might not have the rifle close enough to your shoulder pocket. If you place the stock to far out on the shoulder...it will kick your butt.

The 150 grainer's definitely have a milder kick. You can also buy reduced recoil loads for the 30-06.

If the gun does not return to the aimpoint after recoil...you might be holding the rifle wrong. Use a natural point of aim by aiming the rifle --- close your eyes/then open them --- if the sights are not on the aimpoint, readjust your body till it does; and repeat the process. I would suggest buying a 12 pound pedestal rest with rear bags; such as a Hart or a Sinclair.

Instead of crossing the shooting hand thumb across the stock...have your thumb pointed forward inline with the stock --- which can reduce the chance of a flinch --- though it is not a compatible technique with the rearward bolt handle location of the Mark 3 Lee Enfield rifle.

Breathe and relax your shoulders. If your trigger finger starts to quiver just as you start to press --- stop --- do the breathing process over and try again; but do not hyperventilate or you might pass out. If you feel dizzy...breathe in a paper bag.

If you're not using a rest --- accept the rifle's wobble --- do not try to snatch the shot when the sight's cross the target. In due time, the wobble radius will get smaller. Proceed with the natural order of things and press the trigger.
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Last edited by Erno86; January 21, 2014 at 03:50 PM.
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Old January 21, 2014, 02:39 PM   #14
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If the gun makes you flinch, you will never be able to use it properly. You really might want to trade for another caliber. What do you plan on using the gun for? Hunting? Target shooting?
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Old January 21, 2014, 03:09 PM   #15
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Quote:
Remove 2 screws that hold the factory pad/plate in place.
Put new pad on either using same screws or replacement screws that come with the new pad. It should literally take you less than 3 minutes.
Most pads require grinding to fit the stock.
It's usually a LOT more involved than just screwing one on
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Old January 21, 2014, 03:51 PM   #16
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DC - Rifle will be used primarily for deer hunting and maybe the occasional target shooting (but rarely).

Moving to a different caliber is a possibility, but I'd rather exhaust all possibilities with this gun (recoil pads, etc) before I change calibers. It was my grandfather's gun, so I'd like to use it for sentimental reasons (this also makes it an untradable rifle).
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Old January 21, 2014, 04:39 PM   #17
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Quote:
Most pads require grinding to fit the stock.
It's usually a LOT more involved than just screwing one on
That is why I mentioned the Limbsaver being a Direct fit.
Limbsaver makes 3 types.
Direct Fit - pre-ground from the factory to specifically fit the factory stock on a lot of different makes and models of rifles. It IS as simple as removing the factory pad and installing the new pad.
Grind To Fit - User has to grind/sand to right shape and size to fit rifle, usually a few dollars cheaper than the Direct Fit.
Slip-on - 2-3 different sizes to fit different size stocks. Just slips on/stretches over the butt of your stock. Doesn't permanently attach.
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Old January 21, 2014, 05:19 PM   #18
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The ammo might be a factor. Recoil is going to be very different in a caliber like .30-'06, where loads can range from 110 grain bullets to 220 grain.

If the rifle is going to be used basically for hunting, anything added to it will increase the weight that has to be carried.

Jim
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Old January 21, 2014, 05:39 PM   #19
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Here is a " drastic" measure but you could always have a muzzle break installed. Just a thought.
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Old January 21, 2014, 06:35 PM   #20
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The bench position is the initial problem. When standing, your body sways back and returns easily, when sitting, it's not going to move easily.

Check your hold, it should give you a good shove, not a blow that will make a bruise. It goes in the well between the shoulder and the collar bone end.

Wear a good jacket.

Get a bench seat with wheels on it. Seriously.

For your flinch, you've trained yourself very well, now to untrain yourself, have a friend hand you the rifle, loaded or unloaded, his choice, and you point, safety off, aim, and pull the trigger. Do that until you have unlearned the flinch. Erno86 had good advice, above.

If you know a reloader, have him make you up some light loads for practice.
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Old January 21, 2014, 08:33 PM   #21
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My first '06 was a Rem 700 with no recoil pad. Yeeoweee, that thing would punch from the bench. Had a Pachmayer Waffle (1974 technology) installed and it was fine with 150 hand loads up to 2900fps. Got a PAST shoulder pad to shoot from the bench and that took care of that.
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Old January 22, 2014, 01:51 PM   #22
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I was a bit off on my last post. Let me give some quotes from air gun expert: Tom Gaylord, Settling-in a firing position.

"The big kickers like a 30-06 are going to push you around some. Don't be surprised if you aren't on the target after the dust settles.

Following through means that you continue to hold your aim after the shot is fired. It takes discipline to do it, but it's the only way that you will ever be able to tell where the sights were when the shot fired. It's the only way you will ever be able to call where the shot went.

If you follow through, you should be able to call your shots most of the time --- as long as you don't blink when the shot fires. But don't try to do this with a large-caliber gun the first time. A pellet gun is the best to start with. A 22 rimfire is another wonderful gun to start with.

Once you get enough skill, you can graduate to progressively larger calibers, and calling your shots will almost become second nature.

While shooting a 30-06...nobody can hold the sights on the point of aim while this gun recoils. But if you're watching, you can take a mental snapshot of the sight picture just before the gun fires.

When I'm on a benchrest or even when I'm in a seated or standing supported firing position, it takes time for me to settle-in properly. I keep adjusting things until the rifle is aimed at the target when I'm completely relaxed. Don't get confused --- I don't necessarily mean that I'm holding the rifle loosely; but if I'm shooting a hard-recoiling rifle like the 30-06, you can be sure that I have the butt tight against my shoulder and the thumb of my firing hand is positioned to not break my nose when it comes back at me in recoil!

Rimfire rifles also need to be held firmly for best results, so maybe it's only pellet rifles that are held loosely. The object is to make sure the sights are aligned with the target when I hold the rifle so that when I close my eyes and relax, the sights remain aligned as before. I actually do this sometimes --- close my eyes, take a deep breath and let it out, then look and see where the sights are.

There's one last step to this hold. That's to touch the trigger and make sure the rifle doesn't move away from the target as it's squeezed. Sometimes, this final step is the place where the last little bit of muscle tension gets revealed and corrected."
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Old January 23, 2014, 03:12 AM   #23
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Two birds with one stone:
The slip-on 1" rubbery recoil pad makes my Yugo Mauser enjoyable if sitting fairly upright. My shoulders are skinny (5'11").

The pad gives both Yugo SKS M59 rifles an ok length-of-pull. Spray the pad orange in case it gets bumped loose when walking in tall grass or weeds.
Very hard to see in long shadows, or to know about Where it Fell Off.
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Old January 23, 2014, 09:22 AM   #24
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agree, that bench shooting will be more punishing...

also you may have gotten a "mountain lite model" when I was dating my wife, her dad was all about the 30-06, & a beginning loader, who liked to stuff the powder in those cases...

I was at the rifle range with them both, shortly after my wife got a new 30-06, to shoot "sliding deer" in preparation for hunting season... turned out the rifle she got, as she's a smaller gal, was a mountain lite Remington 700, & with her dad's hot loads, from a standing position, the recoil knocked off her ball cap, & her sun glasses went flying on the 1st shot... all her dad's old buddies were laughing & asking how much powder he stuffed in those cases...

the mountain lite is a nice rifle, for hunting, light weight, & easy to carry, but pretty tough to shoot regularly at the range...
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Old January 23, 2014, 10:05 AM   #25
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For shooting on a bench I use a recoil pad under my shirt. I purchased one years ago when I got my first 458 win mag. With my pad I can shoot 458 full house loads from a proper bench. (The hardest thing is to keep from dropping the front off the rest) On a bench I don't care about length of pull, the bench position is it's own thing. Most benches that I have seen are setup all wrong. You don't want the rifle on top of your shoulder or on bone. Find a bench that lets you sit up more. If you are leaning forward with the stock on bone it's going to hurt.
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