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Old January 8, 2014, 07:28 PM   #1
sfwusc
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Slow Cooker recipe for vension back straps?

Does anyone have one they love?
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Old January 8, 2014, 07:39 PM   #2
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Make chops, chicken fry with gravy and biscuits. Use slow cooker on tougher cuts.
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Old January 8, 2014, 08:18 PM   #3
NoSecondBest
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Quote:
Slow Cooker recipe for vension back straps
This is like making stew with filet mignon.....criminal.
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Old January 8, 2014, 08:55 PM   #4
.284
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I really agree it's a waste of a prime cut. Breaded and shallow chicken fried is hard to beat.

If you held a gun to my head, I would say cut them in chunks and brown them up. Then, I would simmer them in gravy and serve them over egg noodles. Honestly, you wouldn't even need a crock pot for that.

This is unnatural act......
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Deer are amazing creatures....so please don't burn the sauteed onions and I'll pass on the steak sauce, thank you.
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Old January 8, 2014, 09:06 PM   #5
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If you need a slow cooker for back straps I suggest taking a cooking class. I'm a big fan of shooting a deer and having the back straps on a wood fired grill ( not charcoal) within 45 minutes of the kill and it turns out awesome. The ultimate deal though is pan fried 'straps with a mixture of fresh picked collards and turnip greens mixed together, combined with mashed potatoes and grease gravy, fried corn fritters or cornbread, and a glass of sweet tea. That's just my 2 cents and that's how we do it in south Alabama. But if your convinced on using a crock pot I have found that cooking them in merlot wine is fairly good.... Serve it over mashed potatoes ( homemade ofcourse) or else egg noodles. Cut it in thin slices
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Old January 8, 2014, 09:54 PM   #6
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If you want to try something a little different, take a piece of the backstrap and let it thaw/assume room temp. Heat up a cast iron skillet to smoking hot, (can do it on a gas grill but takes a little while to get the skillet hot enough), while heating the skillet, simply shake on a mixture of salt, garlic powder& black pepper. Add a small amount of oil to the skillet and put the strap into the hot skillet. Should immediately begin to sizzle/smoke. allow the down side to carmelize (get a dark color) and rotate to next side, you make have to move the piece around the skillet (only one piece of meat at a time) to keep it on a really hot spot. Keep moving/turning until all sides are brown. Allow it to cool for several minutes. When cooled down start slicing off little medallions, you should see a cooked outer portion and a rare to dead rare center part, slices about 1/4 inch thick. The slices will almost melt in your mouth and have the texture of raw/rare tuna. If you wish instead of slicing them after they cool, wrap them in pastry dough and again salt/pepper/garlic the outside of the dough, then pop them in the oven until the dough browns on top. Venison Wellington, DELICIOUS.
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Old January 8, 2014, 10:30 PM   #7
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Roasts

I agree with most of the posts that said that its too good a cut of meat for the slow cooker. Steaks don't take that long to cook in a pan or finish in the oven. I am not a cook either. I have had a version of those venison wellingtons described above and it is awesome. Venison roasts are great in the crock pot. I like lots of vegetables like potatoes, celery, carrots, tomatoes, corn, onions, and jalapenos or green chilies. I like jalapenos with everything, though. For seasoning I think it just needs a little bit of salt. Pretty simple, but good. Hope that helps.

Last edited by Againstthewind; January 8, 2014 at 10:36 PM.
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Old January 8, 2014, 11:22 PM   #8
Mossybank
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No slow cooker recipes for back straps, but give this one a try with a roast. It is called Butter Roast. Place roast in slow cooker, sprinkle on one package of Good Seasons Ranch Dressing, one package of Au Jus mix, and place one stick of butter on top of the roast. Close top and cook on low for 7 to 8 hours.
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Old January 9, 2014, 02:12 AM   #9
FrankenMauser
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Back strap in a crock pot. That hurts my brain.
That's like buying $350 worth of porterhouse steaks, and running them through a meat grinder for tacos. (Not making fun of you - just not a concept that agrees with me.)


Back strap is best fried, simmered, grilled (with added fat), or roasted over open flame ... always thin-sliced.

Back straps aside - if you put venison in a crock pot, be sure to do two things:
1. Add fat.
2. Only cook on low - never medium or high.

Failing to do one or both of those will result in tough, dry meat. It doesn't matter that it's been soaking in a hot tub for 6-12 hours, it's gonna be dry as hell in your mouth.
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Old January 9, 2014, 07:55 AM   #10
J270
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The crock pot and I have a love hate relationship. I love the fact that it makes buck meat taste great. I hate the fact that it causes me to blow through my vennison supply rather quickly
Some of my favorites: take crock pot, add meat, add you're favorite commercial jar of salsa, I don't think the fresh home made style works as well.
Let the meat and salsa cook on low for eight to nine hours.
After you are done cooking, add a can of black beans and melt a block of cream cheese into it, serve over white rice.
I whip this out on the folks who say they don't like vennison.
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Old January 9, 2014, 08:02 AM   #11
Elkins45
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Blackstrap in the crock pot would be treated just like any other cut of venison in the crock pot: chop up an onion and add a package of beef stew seasoning mix...but I agree that the crock pot or pressure cooker is best suited to making the less desirable cuts tender.

My newest and current favorite use for tenderloin or blackstrap is bistec a la Mexicana. Recipe here: http://www.food.com/recipe/bistec-a-la-mexicana-225105
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Old January 9, 2014, 09:14 AM   #12
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I have to agree with the group here and say that its a waste of a prime cut to put a loin in the slowcooker/crockpot. I buterfly the loin and make steak sandwhiches or marinate and cook rare over an open flame then slice thin similar to a london broil. I have also had bacon wrapped and broiled loin. Debone a shoulder or a ham and use in your crockpot.
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Old January 9, 2014, 11:28 AM   #13
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I'm going to buck the trend here. While I love pan seared backstraps or marinated and grilled, putting a whole backstrap in a crock-pot with a coupla packages of onion soup mix, whole new potatoes and baby carrots is not "wasting" or "ruining" the meat. It is actually one of my favorite roasts and a Christmas tradition in my family. It's such a simple way to make an excellent meal that even someone with absolutely no cooking talent at all can make a meal of venison that rivals anything a experienced chef can create. Dump it all in before work, turn the crock-pot on low and when you come home it's ready to eat and perfectly done. Melts in your mouth and makes for some great leftovers.
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Old January 9, 2014, 03:58 PM   #14
sfwusc
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Ok. I am at a disadvantage. I am in an apartment right now.

I have access to a gas grill.

Any good recipes for me?
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Old January 9, 2014, 04:31 PM   #15
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Slice some medallians about 1/4 ich thick, pound them with a meat hammer, marinate in some marinade you like (I tend to like a southwest flavoring) or you can just use italian salad dressing. slice up some jalapeno peppers lengthwise, wrap the marinated medalliam around the jalapeno slice, wrap the whole thing with bacon, put a tooth pick through it to hold it together, and grill it hot, until the bacon gets a little crispy. Toughest thing to do is not overcook venison on a grill, goes from red and tender to grey and tough in a very short time. Done right you should have crisped bacon on the outside, the crunch on the jalapeno in the center, and a nice tender juicy meat roll.
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Old January 9, 2014, 06:33 PM   #16
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Quote:
Ok. I am at a disadvantage. I am in an apartment right now.

I have access to a gas grill.

Any good recipes for me?
Long as you have a stove and a skillet(preferably a cast iron skillet) you can make deer back straps melt in your mouth. Same as you can on the grill. The secret to good back straps is having your oil and skillet good and hot before you drop the tenderloin pieces in there. And just like cooking a good steak on the grill or in a skillet, don't overcook the meat.

If you go the very top of 'The Hunt' forum page, you will see a sticky thread titled 'Recipe Thread'. There are some excellent recipe's in that thread that will make your gums beat your brains out.

Last edited by shortwave; January 9, 2014 at 06:43 PM.
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Old January 9, 2014, 11:41 PM   #17
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Roasts2

I got to thinking and reading some of the other posts (i.e. buck) and I might have to try backstraps in the crockpot with some of these recipes. I will have to get some soup mixes, too. With my pretty limited butchering skills the backstraps is where I get the best steaks, so it makes it harder to be open minded about trying something knew with an old favorite. Roasts are sounding really good now. My wife will get up and fix something in the crock pot before she goes off to work and when we get home the house smells great and there is dinner ready. She is awesome. I will have to pay attention to how she does it to broaden my culinary skills a little instead of the dumping stuff into the pot or pan and hoping it turns out technique I usually use.
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Old January 10, 2014, 08:48 AM   #18
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Crock pots are fabulous for roasts, and butchering skill can be very minimal to get it done, basically it just has to fit in the crock pot with enough room left for liquid and taters, carrots, onions etc. I finally convinced my daughter after she moved away that a crock pot is her best friend, load it up in the morning and when you come home, the entire house smells wonderful. Dry soup mixes, canned soup mixes, bullion all make great additions to the roast/crock pot, but be careful it is easy to make it too salty with canned/dry mixes. I like to add some onions in at the very beginning, sliced thin they almost disappear in the broth and tastes like a french onion soup, only with meat and taters too. I can't make myself do it with back straps, but roasts cut from a hind quarter are great that way, or even just chunks of boned out meat. I had some deer neck roast once in the crock pot that we used beer for the liquid, and toward the end put in a jar of peppercini peppers and made sandwiches with some marinara sauce on hoagie buns, was pretty dang good.
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Old January 10, 2014, 09:28 AM   #19
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Dc777, Next time you do what you stated - Invite me. If not Im coming anyhow
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Old January 10, 2014, 03:26 PM   #20
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My favorite way to cook backstrap is to put it in some lowrys or A1 marinade and go for trail ride. Ride about 15 miles, get back to camp take care of the horses and get a fire burned down to a nice bed of coals. Cut it into cubes about 3/4" and fry it in a cast iron skillet over the fire.
You could try to do the marinade while you're at work and then fry it on the stove in your kitchen but I don't think it will taste nearly as good.
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Old January 10, 2014, 04:29 PM   #21
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just slice thinly an pan fry !! You may marinade first.That is the tender part of the deer !
I once had a deer that was so tough [even the liver ]that I had to grind the whole thing ! Crock wouldn't have helped . ] But I had many pounds of very fine pasta sauce !
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Old January 10, 2014, 05:46 PM   #22
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Ooh! OP hurts!

Preheat oven to 500 (yes 500!) after bringing meat to room temp.

Add a light coat of canola (rapeseed) oil to each side of 1 1/2" - 2" cuts, salt and pepper as well.

Cast iron pan on high heat. Sear each side about 45 seconds. Don't press on them!

In the oven now for 2-3 minutes a side. (Don't over cook!)

Let rest on a luke warm plate with foil over the top for 3-5 minutes.

Add a pat of butter (bacon and/or mushrooms and/or grilled onions pretty good, too), eat slowly.

This is for those who really want to taste the unadulterated meat...for purists, if you will. No breading, no strange seasoning mix, etc.
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Old January 10, 2014, 06:58 PM   #23
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Backrub- come on brother
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Old January 11, 2014, 10:33 AM   #24
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Marinate the whole strap in Italian dressing, fresh chopped garlic, a splash of soy sauce and a good slug of bourbon, rye or Canadian whiskey. I don't drink but I keep a bottle of Wellar around just for this. Let it marinate in the fridge for at least two days. When you're ready to cook, pat it dry (important), grind fresh pepper on it and wrap the meat with bacon.

Get the grill very hot and brown about two minutes on a side, then set it off the flame, insert a meat thermometer, close the lid and keep an eye on the temp. I pull it off at 150 for reddish pink but thats up to you. About fifteen minutes on my grill. DON”T over cook. Let the strap rest for a few minutes then slice in 1/4” rounds.

Yummm!
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Old January 11, 2014, 01:14 PM   #25
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I just smoke it....but then again I do that with about every meat.
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