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Old December 24, 2013, 06:42 PM   #26
tomrkba
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In the country called the Commonwealth of Virginia, all I need to do is go to vaguntrader.com or any mesage board and I can buy any non-Class 3/non-destructive device that is available. I do not need permission from the state.
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Old December 24, 2013, 09:09 PM   #27
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Here in Ohio, if buying from a federally licensed dealer at a retail store or a gunshow (MOST people selling at shows here are licensed gun dealers with stores that also set up tables at the shows), all you have to do is pay your money, fill out a form 4473 for the ATF and wait for the dealer to call in the NICS background check. If the background check comes in clean, you walk out with your gun (18 years old for long guns, 21 years old for handguns).

If buying from a private seller, either someone you meet via a website such as armslist.com or at a gunshow, there is no paperwork or NICS background check. I believe (having bought and sold MANY guns from/with private sellers) that the only requirement is that the buyer is of legal age (18/21 as noted above) and that you have no reason to believe that they are a "prohibited person" (felon, addict, etc).

There are no permits, waiting periods, etc here.

All in all, Ohio is not a bad place to live for a gun owner. Even the requirements for a concealed carry permit are as reasonable as any gun law can be in this country at this time.

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Old December 24, 2013, 10:50 PM   #28
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As others have mentioned, we have 50 states, the District of Columbia, Peurto Rico and probably some other ares I have forgotten. Each will have laws layered upon the national (or federal) requirements. Some are very restrictive, banning some types of guns, some large magazines, mandating special licensing, testing, etc. Others have little or nothing beyond the federal laws.

In my state (Arkansas) there are no state laws beyond what the federal government mandates for purchasing. If one has the state issued concealed carry permit (which is fairly easy to obtain) the background check is waived since you did that already to get the permit.

With private transfers (sales between individuals) I think the buyer must be 18 for handgun or long gun. Other than that not much is required. Legally owning fully automatic rifles, silencers and short barrel rifles and shotguns is relatively easy in this state and I see them for sale. We have no restrictions on firearm type or magazine capacity.
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Old December 25, 2013, 05:40 PM   #29
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From a FFL dealer:
Cash, check, or credit card, current ID with place of residence, completed 4473 and NICS approval ( the last three are federal, and requires everywhere)
From a private party:
Cash or check
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Old December 26, 2013, 05:14 AM   #30
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Firearms Ownership in Japan

Starting from scratch a shotgun is your only option. To purchase a rifle you need to have owned a shotgun for 10 years without any issues. There is no possible way to legally own a modern cartridge handgun in Japan - just forget it.

The following is a BRIEF description of the process :

1) Learn to understand spoken and written Japanese - all instructions and testing are done in Japanese with no provision for other languages.

You will need a hunting license, a firearms ownership license, hunting club membership, and then approval to purchase a firearm.

2) Hunting license - Attend a one day hunter's class at your local police station (available about 6 times per year). One day test and evaluation - hands on test with practical evaluation and a tough written test (pass rate about 30% - for Japanese). Fee is $350. Renewal required every three years.

3) Firearms ownership license - One day test and evaluation - hands on test with practical evaluation and a tough written test (pass rate about 20%) Fee is $300.

4) Mandatory membership in local hunting club. Annual fee about $350.

5) Firearms purchase approval - This is done through your local police. They will question - face to face - your neighbors and family about you. You will need to provide approval from your employer and local city/ward government head. Of course they do an extensive background check on your criminal past (if any), employment, residences, etc. Police will inspect the location where you install the government approved safe in your home. They will also have authority to check on this any time while you maintain your license. There are numerous fees all through this process and, in extreme cases can take up to one year to complete.

Any shotgun here will cost 3 to 5 times what you would expect to pay for the same model in the US.


About the only upside - bag limits are :

Deer - one of each sex (one buck, one doe) per day
Bear - one per day
Boar - one per day
Pheasant - one per day

Hunting "season" is year round. You can hunt every day the sun rises.
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Old December 26, 2013, 06:32 AM   #31
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@Tejicano; I couldn't imagine living in a place that oppressive.

Here in Tennessee you need to fill out your 4473 and have money and ID. Our background checks are done through the TBI by computer and cost $10, which usually gives me a Proceed in about two minutes. Oddly, if I buy a long gun in another state and go through a NICS check it will nearly always delay me (much to my chargrin when I was at the CMP Store and had to leave my Garand).
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Old December 26, 2013, 07:46 AM   #32
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In Illinois, in addition to the Federal Regulations (18 yr old for rifle & 21 yr old for pistol) you must have a current FOID (Firearms Owner ID) card. Purchase requires the FOID, form 4473 & NICS background check (5 min wait) and waiting period requirement (rifles 24 hours, pistols 72 hour wait) and of course cash. Most FFL's will require a drivers lic with the same address as that on your FOID.

To obtain a FOID you must submit a written application with photo and $10.00 processing fee, wait 30 days to get your card (background check by Illinois State Police). Cards are currently issued as valid for 10 years.

That's it.
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Old December 26, 2013, 11:40 AM   #33
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In Japan, bow hunting must be very popular.
Were there very stringent gun laws in Japan before it became an occupied country, after WW2?
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Old December 26, 2013, 06:09 PM   #34
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Bow hunting is strictly illegal here in Japan.

You can hunt with 1) a snare or trap, 2) with an air rifle (small caliber only), 3) with a shotgun, or 4) with a rifle (the rifle only after 10 years experience with a shotgun). No archery nor muzzleloading is allowed for hunting.

There is a very small shooting community with muzzleloaders but all of those had to have been registered before 1870 (no, that's not a typo - eighteen hundred and seventy). Buying a muzzleloader here is almost as easy as buying an NFA item in the US. Just about all of these are old matchlocks. I have seen fewer than a half dozen cap-and-ball revolvers (mostly original Colt's) for sale on this market, mostly selling for $20,000 to $35,000, but I know of no legal way to get firing caps for them.
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Old December 26, 2013, 06:39 PM   #35
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@Tejicano; I couldn't imagine living in a place that oppressive.
Just because some country has strict firearms laws, doesn't automatically mean it is an oppressive country. There are more things than firearms laws that make a country an oppressive place or not.
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Old December 26, 2013, 07:40 PM   #36
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There are more things than firearms laws that make a country an oppressive place or not.
True, but it does make slaves of the populace under the foot of the military rulers. Down with King George III and all that followed him.

Manta49, does southern Ireland have more freedoms??

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Old December 26, 2013, 09:33 PM   #37
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Just because some country has strict firearms laws, doesn't automatically mean it is an oppressive country. There are more things than firearms laws that make a country an oppressive place or not.
Not exactly firearms related but more on the subject of freedom/oppression - on a trip back to home it was striking how often you see cars pulled over by the police in the US (I had forgotten about this). In Japan I might see that once a month or less.

I also once saw a guy screaming into the face of a cop over a parking ticket here in Japan. The cop just took it and let the guy rant. When he was done the guy drove away - nothing else happened. In the US, in any state I have been to, I can only imagine how many days you would spend in jail (and/or the hospital) after doing something like that. Japanese cops really do their jobs like they are servants of the public at large.
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Old December 27, 2013, 05:25 AM   #38
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Manta49, does southern Ireland have more freedoms??
If you are talking about firearms laws, the laws are stricter in the Republic of Ireland than Northern Ireland.

Quote:
True, but it does make slaves of the populace under the foot of the military rulers.
Civilians would have more firearms here than the police. The UK is a democracy like America and is not ruled by the military, so your question makes no sense.

Last edited by manta49; December 27, 2013 at 05:54 AM.
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Old December 27, 2013, 09:39 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by manta49
Just because some country has strict firearms laws, doesn't automatically mean it is an oppressive country. There are more things than firearms laws that make a country an oppressive place or not.
That is true I suppose, but it is oppressive in that way at least. I suppose the difference in culture has something to do with it. In Japan, the samurai tradition is deeply ingrained in the collective memory. In the US, we have the American rifleman ingrained in our's.
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Old December 27, 2013, 10:03 AM   #40
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In Japan 99% of criminal suspects confess and no trial is required. This is because in Japan criminal suspects are beaten and tortured into signing confessions.

Japan has no historical traditions with firearms. They have been banned from the beginning as the Shoguns realized that a peasant with a musket could kill the best Samurai and that simply wouldn't do to maintain their imperial system.
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Old December 27, 2013, 10:13 AM   #41
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i'm curious about what's needed to purchase a gun as well. I frequently come across Armslist ads where the seller specifies a 'permit to purchase' is needed - this is for long guns i've seen up for sale. I found this confusing because I didn't think a permit was required to buy long guns.....just a driver's license.
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Old December 27, 2013, 10:16 AM   #42
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I also once saw a guy screaming into the face of a cop over a parking ticket here in Japan. The cop just took it and let the guy rant. When he was done the guy drove away - nothing else happened. In the US, in any state I have been to, I can only imagine how many days you would spend in jail (and/or the hospital) after doing something like that. Japanese cops really do their jobs like they are servants of the public at large.
I had a hard time taking cops in Japan seriously when I lived there. I remember seeing a couple of punk kids on scooters outrunning a cop car in Tokyo, and cops on bicycles are even worse. The ones i've come across in urban centers like Tokyo seemed to just sit in their little police boxes and do nothing all day
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Old December 27, 2013, 10:25 AM   #43
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The UK is a democracy like America
This may be a bit off topic, but the UK is not a democracy. The Queen is the richest woman in the world and has never earned a penny of it. When was the last time anyone in the House of Lords had to run for election?? (NEVER)

And the last I heard Northern Ireland was still an occupied country, or have all the troops left??

The US had to fight the British to gain our freedoms, India had to fight the British to gain their freedom, Palestine had to fight the British to gain their freedom, Southern Ireland had to fight the British to gain their freedom.

With GUNS, that is why we are so strongly against anyone that want's to take them away from us. We want to keep our freedoms from tyrants that want to take our democracy from us. And by the way we are a Republic (representative government)

Jim

Your idea of democracy and mine are worlds apart.
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Old December 27, 2013, 10:32 AM   #44
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Democracy is mob rule. A Republic is rule of law.
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Old December 27, 2013, 12:02 PM   #45
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This may be a bit off topic, but the UK is not a democracy. The Queen is the richest woman in the world and has never earned a penny of it. When was the last time anyone in the House of Lords had to run for election??
Firstly, the Queen: no she isn't. Not even in Britain J.K. Rowling is the richest woman there, I believe. Secondly she plays only a ceremonial role in the running of the state, so why she has been raised in this topic is a puzzle.
Nonetheless, whilst I am pretty ambivalent about the existence of the Royal Family, I must say they work pretty hard. You might want to see exactly how busy the Queen still is at 80-something years old...

Power lies with Parliament where laws and policy are managed by botht eh House of Commons and House of Lords. What one House puts forward the other reviews and scrutnises. Financial policy making and budgets are the responsibility of the HoC and the House of Lords have no veto in that regard. They can only voice their opinion. The HoC can take it on board or tell them tough luck.

The MPs in the HoCs are elected.

So, pretty much wrong on all counts...
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Last edited by Pond, James Pond; December 27, 2013 at 12:08 PM.
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Old December 27, 2013, 12:29 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by gaseousclay View Post
i'm curious about what's needed to purchase a gun as well. I frequently come across Armslist ads where the seller specifies a 'permit to purchase' is needed - this is for long guns i've seen up for sale. I found this confusing because I didn't think a permit was required to buy long guns.....just a driver's license.
A permit isn't required to purchase long guns in most states. I'm guessing it's for protection of the seller because if the buyer has a permit to purchase then they are most likely not a felon. In my state selling a long gun doesn't even require a drivers license as far as I know, because there aren't any laws about interstate sale of long guns.
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Old December 27, 2013, 12:50 PM   #47
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J.K. Rowling is the richest woman there,
Didn't know she bought the Crown Jewels and all the Castles that come with the crown as well as all the art work that is part of State property. Maybe Rowlings lends the Queen the Royal Yacht to use as well as all the Bentleys and gold covered coches.

I am sure there are plenty of guns to protect the Royal family, but that can not be said of the surfs that live in Soho or any other part of England or the UK.

Parliament sits by permission of the Queen and she can dissolve Parliament at any time. I am not anti-British but anti-crown and all that it stands for.

Like Patrick Henry said " Give me liberty or give me death". Living under the heel of any monarch no matter how motherly she or he seems, is not freedom by any stretch of the imagination. If you don't believe me just ask her children. The cost of maintaining the Crown is more than Rowlings made on all of her books and is paid for by the sweat and tears of British labor.

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Old December 27, 2013, 01:02 PM   #48
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Didn't know she bought the Crown Jewels and all the Castles that come with the crown as well as all the art work that is part of State property. Maybe Rowlings lends the Queen the Royal Yacht to use as well as all the Bentleys and gold covered coches.
Be flippant all you want.
The Queen may be rich, but she falls well short of the Richest. Well short.

Quote:
I am sure there are plenty of guns to protect the Royal family, but that can not be said of the surfs that live in Soho or any other part of England or the UK.
Do you know what a serf is? It is essentially a peasant who works for food on a lord's estate. Is that what you claim is the British public?

Quote:
Parliament sits by permission of the Queen and she can dissolve Parliament at any time. I am not anti-British but anti-crown and all that it stands for.
Her role is ceremonial. Entirely ceremonial.
If she tried to apply those "powers" inappropriately she'd soon see she is not that powerful as all that.

I am not pro crown, but I am pro accurate representation of other nations...

I also think this is way off topic now.
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Old December 27, 2013, 01:03 PM   #49
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And the last I heard Northern Ireland was still an occupied country, or have all the troops left??
This is off topic but I hope that the mods will understand that I have to reply this type of misinformed post and give me some leeway. N Ireland is part of the UK and the some British army and N Irish regiments are based here just like American army soldiers are based in America. It will remain part of the UK until the majority of people in N Ireland want that to change democracy at work again. Your post is like me asking an American is America still an occupied country that was forcibly taken from native American Indians. It never fails to amaze me the lack of knowledge regards the UK the laws and the role of the queen by some Americans.

Back on topic firearms are easy to get in this part of the UK , certain things will stop you violent criminal history for example. If you do get firearms they have to be stored in a safe when not in use.
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Old December 27, 2013, 01:12 PM   #50
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is America still an occupied country that was forcibly taken from native American Indians.
Yes it is. As well as forcibly taken from the French, Spanish and British.

No there is no universal requirement to store firearms in a safe here (Yet). They do have to be kept out of the reach of children.

My pistols are stored in a safe and my rifles are stored locked in gun cabinets.

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