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Old December 26, 2013, 08:30 AM   #26
F. Guffey
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I want all the bullet hold I can get, I call bullet hold ‘bullet hold’ because I can measure bullet hold, others call it neck tension, why? I do not know, they can not measure neck tension. I say tamatter, they say tomotter.

When I fire a case I want them to lock onto the chamber, I want 100% contact between the chamber and case body.

I have loads that have ‘that bling’, I place them on the table when I am at the range and notice someone critiquing what I have on the table and comparing my reloads with what they have on their table and fantasying how much better they are at reloading than the person next to them.

F. Guffey

Last edited by F. Guffey; December 26, 2013 at 08:31 AM. Reason: change o to er
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Old December 27, 2013, 12:57 AM   #27
jamaica
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I don't believe the extra shiny brass is any problem. Enjoy!

Ah, yes, the B36. I do remember seeing those fly over. No mistaking the sound nor the appearance.
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Old December 27, 2013, 02:23 PM   #28
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My vibe is usually on a timer but the "Holiday" lights are using that at the moment. I guess that puts me at risk!

The only problem I've had with shiny brass is that it's harder to see the color change when annealing case necks.
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Old December 27, 2013, 03:06 PM   #29
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Might need to wear dark glasses when handling the cases!
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Old December 27, 2013, 07:33 PM   #30
Greg Mercurio
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If slick cases will give higher bolt thrust, then why do manufacturers still sell nickel plated cases? I'd really like to read some empirical studies of this phenomenon.

My engineering hackles are raised.
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Old December 28, 2013, 06:32 AM   #31
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Just retrieved a batch of 200 9 mms from the tumbler. They have stayed there overnight. And they do look over polished. So much that they look like new, because they had been into the ultrasonic cleaner before and they are spotless inside and outside, including primer pockets.

Can't wait to load them. I like this "like factory ammo" feeling .
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Old December 30, 2013, 01:07 AM   #32
medalguy
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I've overtumbled brass several times, and never had any problems with it. I wouldn't lose any sleep over it.

When I was a kid living in Austin Texas, we lived near Bergstrom AFB and I can remember the B-36s flying over our house, and they looked like they would block out the sun. That was a beautiful aircraft.
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Old December 30, 2013, 08:48 AM   #33
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Last Friday took my nephew to the USAF museum in Daton OH. The look on his face when it saw the B36 indoors was priceless.
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Old December 30, 2013, 11:41 AM   #34
F. Guffey
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Ozzieman, the B36 at Dayton sat outside for years, it was one of two that I knew to exist. When it snowed the weight of the snow on the tail would lower the tail and raise the nose, as the snow would melt the plain leveled off.

Out of sync, the B36 was know for breaking windows and shaking items from shelves. All 6 engines ran off of one ignition system on one engine after it was started. the props were 19 ft. in diameter, there was a concern for exceeding the sound barrier at the end of the prob. incredible, When #1 fired, all the #1s fired.

Anyone around Jacksboro/Archer city, TX. The wings on the B36 were maintained by removing them, a trailer was built to remove them in one piece. the only trailer I know of in existence is/was being used as a camping/hunting trailer near Jacksboro/Archer city.

When pulling that trailer everything looks like a hill.

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Old December 30, 2013, 06:08 PM   #35
Greg Mercurio
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Mr. Guffey: Your knowledge of things related to firearms, bullets, and reloading are without a doubt complete beyond reproach. However, things aeronautical are not. The B-36 used the Pratt & Whitney R-4360, a 4 row, 7 cylinders per row, 28 cylinder engine.

The Ignition system was Bendix-Scintilla dual low tension magnetos, one per row, 4 per engine. Spark plugs are 2 per cylinder, dual coils as well, with one coil per plug. Coils are mounted on the top of the cylinders. Standard practice for the time, and continuing on through today, piston powered engine ignition systems are engine mounted, redundant, self contained, and do not require battery power for function. Not sure where your data on the single ignition system comes from.

They were maintenance nightmares, and were prone to blowing jugs in the middle rows due to cooling issues. My father-in-law was a crew chief on the B-36 for a number of years, and had a love/hate relationship with the engines.

I got up close and personal with one of these beasts when I was a student of Aeronautical Engineering at ASU. Absolutely boss engine, wouldn't want to work on one.
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Old December 30, 2013, 08:15 PM   #36
F. Guffey
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I have been accused of building boobie traps into my responses, I do not defend nor have I ever made an attempt to defend myself, I have always insisted boobies were too easy to catch without a trap.

"However, things aeronautical are not" I have the manuals for the electronic system including the ignition system, again, one when fired they all fired on #1.
F. Guffey

and the engins had two horse power ratings, according to the manuals.

Last edited by F. Guffey; December 30, 2013 at 08:18 PM. Reason: change j to g
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Old December 31, 2013, 07:37 AM   #37
Greg Mercurio
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Mr. Guffey: I'm guessing you are confused about something. Far be it from me to try to unconfused you.
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Old December 31, 2013, 08:54 AM   #38
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"However, I would proceed with caution with very shiny brass. If shiny also translates to very slick. Slick is not good, that's why we clean the sizing wax/lube off the brass before firing. During firing, a slick case may not grip the chamber wall as intended and may transfer some of that energy back to the bolt head. That can't possibly be good for the bolt face or worse, your face."

It was always my impression that the sizing wax/lube needed to be removed because it created an additional layer that, upon firing, reduced the chamber diameter preventing the case from expanding as much as it could otherwise, thereby increasing pressure. Is that essentially what you mean by "may not grip the chamber wall as intended"?
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Old December 31, 2013, 10:10 AM   #39
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The only technical problem I am aware of from over-tumbling is in larger rotary tumblers where running too long causes the mouth of the case to gradually bend inward. I once bought 1000 pieces of LC 68 Match from Jeff Bartlett in which he explained he'd let it run too long. It was pull-down brass, so it was new and never fired and customers would expect it to be correctly sized as it arrived, but it actually needed a mandrel or a Lyman M die run in to open it up for loading.
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