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Old December 28, 2013, 05:44 PM   #1
CC268
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Mounting a scope?

Last question for a while, I promise! I have been watching Youtube videos on how to properly mount the scope. I have a Tikka T3 Lite .243 and plan on getting a scope here for it in the next few days. Are there any special tools I should get (bore sighter, etc)? Any other tips or suggestions? Should I pick up some sort of cheek pad for the stock?
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Old December 28, 2013, 07:12 PM   #2
jmr40
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How you mount it depends entirely on the mounts. If you use the factory Tikka mounts you will need a hex wrench that fits the mounts. I think it is included, but cannot remember.

I would strongly recommend that you replace all 6 screws with better screws from a hardware store. It cost me $3 at Home Depot. I just took the mounts in with me to make sure they fit. The factory screws do not allow the wrench to get very deep into the opening and they are soft. Better screws make a huge difference. You'll run across a lot of folks who don't like the factory mounts, but they work just fine after replacing the screws.

Put the scope in the rings and snug it up, but not so much that you cannot move it. Get the crosshairs vertical and the eye relief where you want it then tighten it down.

Bore sight tools are a waste of money. Go to the range, place your rifle on a sandbag rest with the bolt removed. Set the crosshairs of the scope on the bullseye. I use 50 yards, but 25 might be better for a beginner. Without moving anything look through the bore and note how far and in which direction you are off. Adjust the scope until the crosshairs are on the bull and the bull is centered in the bore. Fire 1 shot. You will likely be within inches, and far closer than any tool will get you. Fine tune your scope and repeat.

These are the targets from the last 3 scopes I zeroed. This is the 1st and only shot at 50 yards after boresighting as described above. Shots #2-5 was at 100 yards. The rifles were all zeroed at 100 yards with 5 shots.



Trying to get perfectly zeroed at 25 or 50 yards is a waste of ammo. You only want to shoot enough to ensure you'll be on paper for your 1st shot at 100 yards. A perfectly zeroed rifle at 25 yards may be so high at 100 that it is off the paper. It would be OK if you are a couple of inches low at 25 before trying longer shots.

You shouldn't need a cheek pad unless the scope is too high or the stock isn't designed for scope shooting. Some scopes with huge front objectives have to be mounted very high for the scope to clear the barrel. In that case it might be needed, but for typical scopes in low or medium rings no.
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Old December 28, 2013, 07:27 PM   #3
AllenJ
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I typically use the bore sighting method JMR40 describes, but I only do it at 25 yards. I have a Bushnell bore sighter but it is just not as accurate as looking down the bore. I sight the rifle in 1" low at 25 yards and that puts me 1"-3" high at 100, depending on what cartridge the rifle is chamber for.
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Old December 28, 2013, 07:39 PM   #4
4runnerman
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Same as posted above-But there is a litle more involved in getting crosshairs perfect. Look at a scope level kit, or one can use feeler gauges under scope to ensure scope is being mounted correct. I can tell you by example, Having a scope that is 1/16 of a inch canted, Zereoed at 300 yards and then adjusted to 600 yards will throw you some where in the 4 inches off to the side. Now if you use hold over this makes no difference.
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Old December 28, 2013, 07:50 PM   #5
Pahoo
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This old trick does work !!!

Quote:
Bushnell bore sighter but it is just not as accurate as looking down the bore.
Excellent point that many folks won't consider and others, have forgotten. This is one check or step that I do when ever I can see through the bore. There is a time and place for bore sighters and other tools. ....

1) Select and properly anchor a good base.
2) Confirm that your scope will fit. On hunters, I seldom go over 40mm bell.
3) Set your eye relief.
4) Set your min. cant. I glass a vertical hanging weighted string.

During these sets, my rifle is secured and level with the aid of two cheap pocket levels.

A note of caution;
A buddy of mine installed a rifle scope onto his slug-gun, this past Iowa deer season. He had his eye relief set for 2-3/4" slugs. Everything was working fine and he was well aware of the danger. Doing so well, that he slipped in a 3"' shell. Ran into him at a GS and knew right off what had happened. It was bad and hope he isn't reading this. He's a great guy and lucky...

Be Safe !!!
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Old December 29, 2013, 12:43 AM   #6
CC268
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So you guys literally take the bolt out and look through the barrel to make sure it is lined up on the target?
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Old December 29, 2013, 12:54 AM   #7
btmj
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Quote:
So you guys literally take the bolt out and look through the barrel to make sure it is lined up on the target?
Yes. It is easy with a bolt gun... less easy with a lever gun or most semi-autos... Being able to do this is one of the joys of a bolt gun !
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Old December 29, 2013, 12:58 AM   #8
CC268
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I gotcha...just watched a Youtube video on it, makes sense now!
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Old December 29, 2013, 07:26 AM   #9
hooligan1
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We use the Wheeler scope mounting kit from Midway USA to mount each and every scope we have, and it makes a big difference, makes 'em rock solid and perfect.
But it's only worth the cash if you have several scope mounting chores ahead of you, see if some buddies need scopes mounted and will pitch in on it.
Comes with lapping bars in 1" and 30mm, a Wheeler "Fat Wrench" screwdriver for proper torquing of base and ring screws, a Level Level Level set of levels, that really can help get scope square to the action, and alignment bars in 1" and 30mm, and lapping compound.
I can say one thing, all scopes mounted in this house have never come loose... and usually three shots to put them into bullseye at 100 yds.
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Old December 29, 2013, 10:15 AM   #10
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I'm assuming you don't have a mount, or rings yet?

If not, I suggest a 20 m.o.a. down-angle base, like the EGW. If you ever want to shoot long-range (and the .243 is very capable), it will allow you to do so with less concern about the available elevation adjustment with the optic you select. I've never used anything but a down-angle base, there's no downside...

Quality rings, don't skimp there. Tighten them so that the gaps are equal on both sides. If mounting them on a rail, be sure to slide them forward before tightening so they can't move under recoil.

You'll need a small level, to place across the action to level the action in the rifle vise on the bench, and then to level the scope itself (usually by placing it across the cap on the elevation knob). It's critical to get the scope level to the action.

Inch-pound torque wrench is helpful, but not necessary. I use Loctite (blue, natch) on all the screws.
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Old December 29, 2013, 10:32 AM   #11
CC268
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I have rings and mount that come with the gun already, but thanks! I will follow the above advice as well as the youtube videos I have watched.
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Old December 29, 2013, 11:19 AM   #12
Pahoo
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The "Particulars"

Quote:
You'll need a small level, to place across the action to level the action in the rifle vise on the bench, and then to level the scope itself (usually by placing it across the cap on the elevation knob). It's critical to get the scope level to the action.
Now we are getting to the particulars and I no longer put a level on my scopes caps as there is a more reliable way. Keep in mind, that you are trying to level of minimize the "redicle" cant/clocking and not the scope. If you anchor the rifle/action and set it to level, just look through your scope at a weighted handing line and set your vertical redicle to the line. ....

Quote:
I gotcha...just watched a Youtube video on it, makes sense now!
When you look through the breach end you will see the bore diameter descending to the to the muzzle. Our eyes, are wonderful things and there is a natural tendency for your mind to center the object in the field of view, just like a peep sight. .....

Be Safe !!!
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