The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Hunt

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old December 10, 2013, 01:12 AM   #1
doofus47
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 9, 2010
Location: live in a in a house when i'm not in a tent
Posts: 1,164
What I learned about pronghorn this weekend

So, I got a late rifle prong horn tag this year for several units in the eastern plains of colorado. It's a first for me. I've never been pronghorn hunting, so I had no idea what to expect.
Luckily, my wife has a college friend who she is still tight with and that friend grew up on a ranch outside of Pueblo. Her dad agreed to take me out on his property.
Which made all the difference, b/c the first thing I learned was:
1. I know nothing about pronghorn.
I'm used to hunting deer and elk. When you spook a deer or elk, yeah, sure, they'll run a bit (elk a bit farther), but then they stop. Pronghorn will run around a hill and then keep going for another half mile as a reaction to a mildly uncomfortable feeling. Prong horn hear a car? Run for half a mile. Hear a butterfly fart? Giddyup for half a mile. My guide (60+ years in the ranching business) was completely nonplussed by this. "Heck, they're not even scared," he said. "If they were scared, they'd kick in the jets and be 5 miles down the road." Ok, note to self: spot and stalk is not gonna happen today.
2. I don't know anything about gauging distance on the plains.
Maybe it's because I've been spending too much time this year with a bow and looking at short distances, but when faced with an endless field that is a flecktarn pattern of catcus and scrub bush and rocks, I couldn't really guesstimate how far the pronghorn were from me. I took a Nikon Promaster 3 but ranging was really tough. Either they were moving and hard targets to put a laser on, or they were just so small and far away that they were hard to range. I pretty much didn't use it after the first couple tries. Maybe other models would be better.
Note to self: good optics are important, knowing distance is better.
3. Tactics are key. Scouting is a must.
The rancher I was with knew the land like he'd been on it his whole life which enabled him to predict where the herd was going. If you have a blind and a water hole; then that's your tactic. Either is valid. You have to get ahead of them, b/c you're not going to catch them. Be patient.
4. Pronghorn are as elusive as 4-hoofed ninjas.
On a day with flat light, they're almost invisible in the distance. In sunlight, they pop out. The rancher mentioned this and a friend of mine from Montana who used to hunt antelope said the same thing. Absolutely true. I chose to use my 6x Viper binoculars over my 8x Hensoldt as the Vipers didn't have a military-issue laser filter and the colors were more true. Several times, we would spot the herd, go around a hill and they were just gone. We'd spend a couple minutes looking about and eventually, we'd spy some wee little pronghorn a half mile farther away. Just gone. Did I mention "be patient"?
5. Don't practice shots under 200 yards.
It's just a waste of time. If you can see a pronghorn at less then 200 yards, you're in a zoo, museum or a blind. Sight your scope in at 200 or more. My Savage had a Nikon with the ballistic drop reticle, so although I was sighted in for an inch high at 100 yards, the next bubble down was 225 and that's what I used. Expect that you might have to make a shot on a moving target and practice for it. They might not be moving quickly, but they are often in motion.
6. Equipment: go light b/c you will be moving a lot.
I debated bringing a bipod or not. I see now that, with the constant presence of 3' tall walking man cacti in all directions, the bipod would have been useless unless I was on an overlook. A tall shooting stick would have been functional. Don't expect to have a solid rest. Food and camel back type water supply are musts.
7. It doesn't take much to kill a pronghorn.
Relatively speaking. I used my Savage 11 in 260 Remington loaded with 120gr. ttsx Barnes Vor-tx to shoot flat and buck the wind. I hit mine head on b/c, well, she was looking at me and I thought it was better to shoot head on than wait for her to turn and start moving again. It went in the front of her neck, through her body, and out her side just ahead of the rear quarter. She fell where I shot her.
.243Win, 6mmRem, 6.5 Grendel, 6.8SPC, 6.5x55, or any of the former wildcats based on the necked down .308Winchester would be sufficient to 300-350 yards. Of course, any long action classic cartridge or any super-thumper would also work but the increasing variables of wind and distance past 400 means you need to know your rifle, scope, your ballistic numbers and your abilities as a shooter.

Don't know if this will help or deter any other first-time pronghorn hunters, but good luck out there.
__________________
I'm right about the metric system 3/4 of the time.
doofus47 is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 03:02 AM   #2
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 11,339
They're not magical, they are alert. If you pressure them or chase them, they run. If you leave them alone, they are pretty easy to hunt, but not too easy. As far as not being able to shoot one under 200 yds, I shot one with a bow at about 35 yds. Pattern them, they are very predictable.

That said, if you don't know how, sure, they can be difficult. Learn to gauge distance first. Then learn to stalk, and I mean really stalk. Doesn't take much to kill one, but you can say the same for deer, elk, moose, etc. And yet people take super magnums out to bang one because they can't do basic fieldwork.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services
Taylor Machine
Scorch is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 05:24 AM   #3
Nathan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 1, 2001
Posts: 1,836
I think it might have been a tough day. 3 things I really value that I learned hunting them.

1) They stop and look at you, if not shot at, at 500-700 yards. If you practice with a good rig and rangefinder, this is a makeable shot!

2) Spot and stock is the key to 0-250 yd shots. If you can find them from a high vantage point, you can plan a route to them. Keep the wind at your nose and walk, hunch over, scooch on your belly, what ever your planned route takes to get there. If they spot you, you either have to shoot or wait for them to make the next move. Sometimes they even walk toward you.

3) They hate to cross fences at speed. This can help on a smaller plot. We had Antelope run around us twice and stop before crossing the fence.


Oh yea, watch out for that dang lead doe! She has her head on a swivel at all times! She keeps the buck alive!
Nathan is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 11:27 AM   #4
Chaz88
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 4, 2010
Posts: 997
Hunting them can also be basically a nonevent. I grew up in eastern Colorado. I remember one of dad's friends coming out from Denver loaded down with every high dollar hunting accessory they had in 1978 and a shoulder mounted cannon. He showed up before first light and we set in the kitchen and drank coffee. He was just itching to get to the hunting and was prepared for it to take days. About first light dad half tucked in his shirt and with coffee cup in hand walked the guy out the back door and said pick the one you want. He used the fence as a rest and it was over about that quick. We then spent the day helping other people track down antelope.

It can also be a long long frustrating hunt to get within range of one. Then after all that work you get to eat one of the gamiest animals I have ever come across. Some people just love eating them. I ate way too much of it growing up and because of that do not care much about hunting them anymore.
__________________
Seams like once we the people give what, at the time, seams like a reasonable inch and "they" take the unreasonable mile we can only get that mile back one inch at a time.

No spelun and grammar is not my specialty. So please don't hurt my sensitive little feelings by teasing me about it.
Chaz88 is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 02:06 PM   #5
steveno
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 18, 2004
Location: Minden , Nebraska
Posts: 1,270
my sister has a house and some land just south of Cheyenne. I was out there a number of years ago and the pronghorns would rest in the shade of my truck. to move my truck just about had to kick them out of the way. there were some about 150 yards out in front of the house so I decided to see how close I could get to them so first I started walking straight at them and I got to about 80 yards or so from them and they ran a ways off and looked at me. then I started walking in a line that would get me walking in front of them but not directly at them and I got to about 30 yards of them and they moved off for a distance and looked at me.
steveno is offline  
Old December 10, 2013, 05:44 PM   #6
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,381
Yea, it's not like hunting anything in the deer family.

Quote:
5. Don't practice shots under 200 yards.
It's just a waste of time. If you can see a pronghorn at less then 200 yards, you're in a zoo, museum or a blind. Sight your scope in at 200 or more. My Savage had a Nikon with the ballistic drop reticle, so although I was sighted in for an inch high at 100 yards, the next bubble down was 225 and that's what I used. Expect that you might have to make a shot on a moving target and practice for it. They might not be moving quickly, but they are often in motion.
Nope.
Although my longest called shot on Pronghorn was 650 yards, I've also shot the vast majority inside of about 140 yards - two of them inside 75 yards. That includes hill country, and wide open plains.
The grand total of 200+ yard shots are (paced, not ranged): ~225 yards, ~435 yards, ~450 yards, and 650 yards. The 225 yard shot could have been shorter, but I was sitting on an ant migration trail and needed to move. I preferred taking the longer shot, over spooking the animal and starting over. And all three of the other shots were my first 3 antelope. After those, I learned how to get closer, and that long shots were unnecessary (and no fun ).

Since 2009, I've taken at least one iron sight rifle on every Pronghorn hunt, because I don't bother shooting, even with a scope, unless I can get close. There just isn't any point in slinging lead out to 400 yards, if I can close the distance and get an easier shot at 90-125 yards.

With very few exceptions, they're all spot-and-stalk affairs, as well. You just have to think like an Antelope, and get ahead of them. ...or think like a fox, and figure out how to get right into the middle of them while they're resting. Being familiar with the area and the local herds is extremely helpful, but not a necessity.

Most of the time, when I'm hunting Antelope in my preferred area in Wyoming, my truck only moves when its picking a carcass up. I walk from camp, and usually fill my tags within 1/2 mile of camp -- close enough that my wife can listen for any shots to connect, and hop in the truck, if she hears the tell-tale "Bang-THWOP".


One thing I'll add:
Never shoot at running Antelope, unless you've wounded them and need to get them stopped immediately (because if you don't, they'll be in the next state before they stop). Every Antelope hunter knows of a success story that involves a running animal and a great shot (or they've even done it themselves), but we all also know about plenty of terrible gut shots and legs shots that would not have happened if the shooter hadn't tried slinging lead at a 45+ mph animal.


Antelope are an oddity. They're stupid, but fast. They're small, but have a huge kill zone. They're easy to spot, but incredibly well camouflaged. They're incredibly fragile, but insanely resilient. They have incredible eyesight, but are fatally curious.

I love hunting Antelope. It can be incredibly easy, or it can make you dig deep to use your skill set to its fullest.
Plus... they taste delicious, when properly handled.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."

Last edited by FrankenMauser; December 10, 2013 at 05:49 PM.
FrankenMauser is online now  
Old December 11, 2013, 08:55 PM   #7
old roper
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 11, 2007
Posts: 985
Friend of mine is retired Brand Inspector out of Pueblo and we do lot of PD shooting mostly south of 50 out to Fowler he live on the Mesa.

Lot of those ranches get hunted pretty hard for pd/coyotes and big key is water ponds/tanks and this year been pretty dry got some late rain and that help.

Also lot of those rancher some of the older ones kids aren't interest so they sell their water/ditch right worth more than the land is.

It's long range shooting some of the ranches others can get closer. First year I hunted antelope after moving here 1977 was east of the Co Springs place called Yorder. I took 243 also 7mag wind was blowing so hard I could of used a 50 but got my buck with 7mag and was good one and have him mounted.

I got a ranch now out by La Junta got some high ground and it's good for LR and only two of us that hunt it. I hunted around Kim for couple years seem to get more coyotes than antelope.

Early years I use to hunt along fence line but I always hunted Oct first rifle antelope buck tag and I still do if I get drawn and didn't this year. I'm with Chaz88 that meat stinks good for sausage mixed with pork they are what they eat.

Sounds like you had good time
__________________
Semper Fi
Vietnam
VFW
old roper is offline  
Old December 12, 2013, 12:13 AM   #8
Deja vu
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 14, 2010
Location: Border of Idaho & Montana
Posts: 2,011
Here is a trick I learned a few years back. If you can get with in 500 yards of them set up one of those orange flags and then leave (make sure they see you leave) and watch the spot from a hidden location. They are related to goats and are very curious creatures. When you leave they will often come and look at the flag.
__________________
Shot placement is everything! I would rather take a round of 50BMG to the foot than a 22short to the base of the skull.

all 23 of my guns are 45/70 govt 357 mag, 22 or 12 ga... I believe in keeping it simple
Deja vu is offline  
Old December 12, 2013, 03:36 PM   #9
mete
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 14, 2004
Location: NY State
Posts: 5,148
How fast ? My very limited experience was to drive along and have one come and pace us. We went a steady 55 mph and he leisurely paced us for a good distance then put the pedal to the metal and disappeared !!
Do any of you had a chance to actually measure the speed like we did ?
__________________
And Watson , bring your revolver !
mete is offline  
Old December 12, 2013, 03:58 PM   #10
BigD_in_FL
Junior member
 
Join Date: December 20, 2012
Location: The "Gunshine State"
Posts: 1,982
Funny, where my friends and I hunted pronghorn we had them come right to us - they are naturally curious like a cat and waving a big white cloth tends to bring them into bow hunting range
BigD_in_FL is offline  
Old December 12, 2013, 04:26 PM   #11
Dirty_Harry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 11, 2006
Location: Kalamazoo, MI
Posts: 823
I would love a chance to hunt a pronghorn someday.
__________________
"The only purpose for a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you never should have laid down."

"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I expect the same from them." -John Wayne
Dirty_Harry is offline  
Old December 12, 2013, 05:05 PM   #12
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,381
Quote:
How fast ? My very limited experience was to drive along and have one come and pace us. We went a steady 55 mph and he leisurely paced us for a good distance then put the pedal to the metal and disappeared !!
Do any of you had a chance to actually measure the speed like we did ?
I've paced them at 52 mph, but there are several published studies available that have records for short-distance sprints of up to 60 mph (97 kph). They've been tracked on multiple occasions, during scientific studies, being able to maintain a constant run at an average 44.7 mph (72 kph) for more than 22 miles.

And, for a fun fact....
Here's a quote from an older post of mine:
Quote:
Interestingly, though... I ran across another source that discusses captive Antelope and some Antelope that stay predominantly on cultivated ground only being able to sprint at speeds up to 51 mph, and only able to maintain speeds averaging about 37 mph over 2-5 miles. Their hypothesis is that the captive (and lazy farm-based) animals don't see as many predatory threats, and never develop their cardio-vascular systems as fully. (I'm sure another factor is that they're over-fed and fat. )
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is online now  
Old December 13, 2013, 09:49 AM   #13
kraigwy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 16, 2008
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 9,204
I've gotten a lot of antelope over the years, I don't think its quite as bad as the OP indicates, but it takes a bit of thinking.

Never shoot at running antelope. Lets say they go anywhere from 30 to 50 MPH. That's 44 to 73.5 FPS.

The time of flight for, lets say a 130 gr 270 is .329 seconds at 300 yards. During the bullets travel the goat can run 14 - 24 feet. That's some lead, but, we don't carry radars, so we don't know if the critter is running 30, 40 or 50 MPH, or what angle. So we can't possibly know how much to lead them.

Be confident in your shooting. If you know you had a good shot, don't assume you miss it the goat runs off. They may or may not display signs of being hit, and depending on the distance you may miss any sign they are hit. The run off and you assume you missed.

Year before last I shot one and blew its lungs out, turned them to the consistency of wet coffee grounds. It showed no sign of being hit, I thought I missed. It ran about 150 yards and did a double summer sault.

Take the time to check the area if you think you missed. I've run across a few dead goats that some one shot, and assumed they missed and didn't check to be sure.

Most people over estimate the range. Antelope are small, plus often standing in tall grass or sage making them look smaller. Range finders don't work that well on the prairie. My Luppy range finder can reach 900 yards in the mountains but I'm lucky to get 400 on the prairie.

I find Mil Dots work better for antelope hunting. Antelope average about 14.5 inches from the top of their back to the bottom of their stomach. At about 300 yards (295.5) the antelope will be about 1.4 mils. at 150 yards about 2.75 mils. 1 mil will be about 417 yards.

Do a chart of mils vs distance and tape it to your stock.

Another given, if you set, kneel or lay down to shoot, you're going to be setting, kneeling or laying in cactus, Its the law of the west.
__________________
Kraig Stuart
CPT USAR Ret
USAMU Sniper School Oct '78
Distinguished Rifle Badge 1071
kraigwy is offline  
Old December 13, 2013, 10:19 AM   #14
Crankylove
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 8, 2008
Location: The land of green Jello and vanilla icecream
Posts: 1,264
Quote:
Another given, if you set, kneel or lay down to shoot, you're going to be setting, kneeling or laying in cactus, Its the law of the west.

I've come home from more than one goat hunt with those cactus bites. My father and uncle have never had them, cause they sit in the truck all day, racing around on dirt roads, taking 1,000 yards Hail Mary shots. A couple of hunts they've gone on, they went thru 100+ rounds each, without filling a tag.

1,000 yard shots+Wyoming wind+slinging lead instead of aiming=no meat in the freezer.

The last goat my uncle tagged, was a fawn he shot at about 10 yards with 220 grain soft point out if his .338 Win Mag..............hit it just at the back of the ribs, you could put your fist through the entrance hole, and right out the exit hole.

He may have used too much gun.

I enjoy hunting speed goats more than any other animal. We spot and stalk, pass on the 1,000 yard shots or running goats, and have a great time. My father and uncle insist on trying to chase them with the truck, racing around to try and cut them off, pile out of the truck and crack off 10-15 shots at running goats 500 yards away............and then complain every year that they can't fill a tag.

The last 6 goats I've tagged were all under two hundred yards, and were spotted and stalked. The last hunt we were on, we watched Frankenmauser do a 1,000 yard stalk on a herd to put a bullet between the eyes of a doe..............and it was almost as much fun as taking a goat ourselves.

Speed goats aren't hard to hunt, they are just different than hunting deer/elk, and require some different methods.
__________________
The answer to 1984 is 1776
Crankylove is online now  
Old December 13, 2013, 10:53 AM   #15
doofus47
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 9, 2010
Location: live in a in a house when i'm not in a tent
Posts: 1,164
deja vu
Quote:
Here is a trick I learned a few years back. If you can get with in 500 yards of them set up one of those orange flags and then leave (make sure they see you leave) and watch the spot from a hidden location. They are related to goats and are very curious creatures. When you leave they will often come and look at the flag.
That's kind of funny b/c I was that flag. We got ahead of our herd, as we assumed, correctly, that they were heading to a certain stock tank that the rancher knew. We spotted and stalked, but as we came over the last rise, they saw us first and took off. 60 pairs of eyes are hard to beat. They ran back over a ridge. I followed them to see if there were any stragglers, or if they had stopped somewhere shy of 400 yards away, and while I was doing that, they circled all the way around the hill behind me and stopped at the bottom looking at me. They stayed there staring at me long enough for me to re-close the distance to about 200 yards where I took the shot. They are a curious type.
__________________
I'm right about the metric system 3/4 of the time.
doofus47 is offline  
Old December 14, 2013, 07:19 AM   #16
hooligan1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 18, 2010
Location: Independence Missouri
Posts: 3,172
Fellas that sounds funner than a -5 degree deerhunt in Missouri, one of these days,( after huge lottery win) I want to try my hand at pronghorn....
__________________
Thanks for coming!
hooligan1 is offline  
Old December 14, 2013, 02:20 PM   #17
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,381
Quote:
The last hunt we were on, we watched Frankenmauser do a 1,000 yard stalk on a herd to put a bullet between the eyes of a doe..............and it was almost as much fun as taking a goat ourselves.
Hoofing it down that dry creek bed in the loose sand took a lot out of me, but it was a helluva lot of fun. And the payoff, punching her head-on, right in the bridge of the nose and out the base of the skull, made it that much better.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is online now  
Old December 14, 2013, 04:47 PM   #18
Art Eatman
Staff Lead
 
Join Date: November 13, 1998
Location: Terlingua, TX, USA
Posts: 22,031
A running antelope story: My father was noted for exceptional skill with a rifle. On a west Texas hunt near Marfa, he was riding in the back of a rancher's pickup. Some antelope paced the truck and then ran ahead and crossed the jeep trail. The rancher stopped.

My father held a lead based on experience with whitetail. "Damned if the bullet didn't hit the dirt behind him!"
__________________
You're from BATFE? Come right in! I use all your fine products!
Art Eatman is offline  
Old December 15, 2013, 11:01 AM   #19
cornbush
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 29, 2008
Location: The retarded place below Idaho
Posts: 1,375
Stalking goats is one of the funnest things you can do in my opinion. If I had to pick one animal to hunt for the rest of my life it would be Antelope, north of Farson WY. Throw in the wife and kids, extended family , Crankylove and Frankenmauser and we have a great time.
__________________
The best shot I ever made was an accident
cornbush is offline  
Old December 15, 2013, 03:47 PM   #20
doofus47
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 9, 2010
Location: live in a in a house when i'm not in a tent
Posts: 1,164
Art Eatman:
Quote:
Some antelope paced the truck and then ran ahead and crossed the jeep trail.
I've heard from several people that if an antelope starts running alongside your car/truck, it will usually try to pass in front of you.
I don't know how fast they can run, but there doesn't seem to be too many of them lying about as road kill, so I suppose that they usually win those races.
__________________
I'm right about the metric system 3/4 of the time.
doofus47 is offline  
Old December 16, 2013, 12:28 PM   #21
cmdc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 1, 2010
Location: kansas city, mo
Posts: 458
This is an interesting thread. According to HuntingNet.com, antelope have been clocked at 70 mph, and their eyesight is equivalent to 8x binoculars
cmdc is offline  
Old December 16, 2013, 05:16 PM   #22
Andrew S
Member
 
Join Date: December 19, 2005
Posts: 50
On my deer hunt this year I was driving my RZR at 45ish and had one book it across the road in front of me. Pretty sure he was going faster than me.

When I shot mine a few years ago I'd say it was a bit over 200yds. The herd spotted me and was starting to take off one by one. Fortunately the one I wanted stuck around for last. My first attempt at getting in close enough to shoot spooked them way out.
Andrew S is offline  
Old December 16, 2013, 05:43 PM   #23
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,381
Quote:
This is an interesting thread. According to HuntingNet.com, antelope have been clocked at 70 mph, and their eyesight is equivalent to 8x binoculars
I'd like to see the citations for that.
I have over a dozen books dedicated to, or with sections dedicated to, studies of Antilocapra Americana (American Pronghorn Antelope); as well as a nice collection of magazine articles with citations of smaller studies.

Other than the instance mentioned below, I have never seen anything along the lines of the 70mph/8x claims.
In that literature, there is actually a mention of a 70 mph speed being recorded, but it was subsequently proven false, when the equipment use to record the speed was found to be faulty.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is online now  
Old December 16, 2013, 07:11 PM   #24
Scorch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 13, 2006
Location: Washington state
Posts: 11,339
And the often-quoted "eyes like 8x binoculars" was coined by Jack O'Connor. Great writer, but not a biologist.
__________________
Never try to educate someone who resists knowledge at all costs.
But what do I know?
Summit Arms Services
Taylor Machine
Scorch is offline  
Old December 17, 2013, 07:13 PM   #25
Kreyzhorse
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 12, 2006
Location: NKY
Posts: 11,370
Quote:
5. Don't practice shots under 200 yards.

If you can see a pronghorn at less then 200 yards, you're in a zoo, museum or a blind.
Simply not true. You will get shots at 200 yards plus, but if spot and stalk and use the land to your advantage, you can certainly get shots inside of 200 yards and even inside 50 yards.

A couple of other notes....

Despite what you might have read, antelope can and will jump fences.

I raced an antelope (he actually raced us I'd guess)and we hit 50mph and ran out of road before he ran out of throttle. Those things can move. I've read they can hold 50 to 60 for a long distance. A cheetah is faster, but an antelope has better endurance.

At the beginning of the season, a herd might watch you get out of the car and not be too concerned. A few days into the season they might bolt if you slow the car down. They get they are being hunted pretty quickly.

Their eye sight is amazing but if you get busted on a stalk and they don't instantly bolt stop moving. Stay still and they might just go back to doing what they were doing prior giving you a chance at resuming your stalk.

They are quirky critters and a hell of a lot of fun to hunt. They eat pretty good too.
__________________
"He who laughs last, laughs dead." Homer Simpson
Kreyzhorse is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2013 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.14283 seconds with 7 queries