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Old December 30, 2013, 04:33 AM   #1
Sidcass
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Any info on this beyonet?

I have found a few beyonet blades in the countryside in UK, i would really like to know the history if there is any at all? just as much information about it as possible. I know nothing about guns or weapons, just after any help or advice from you guys. Any dates or ideas on the gun it was used?

The only marking I can see says AM86, but I could do with giving it abit more of a clean up to see if says anything else.

I appreciate your help

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1388395785.528690.jpg
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1388395804.944723.jpg
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1388395891.913857.jpg
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Old December 30, 2013, 01:13 PM   #2
Mk VII
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They appear to be unfinished forgings for SLR or possibly Lee-Enfield No.5 bayonets. Some context of where you found them might be useful.
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Old December 30, 2013, 01:53 PM   #3
noelf2
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L1a4 bayonet ?
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Old December 30, 2013, 02:47 PM   #4
Sidcass
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L1A4 looks like a good match, does it look like the bayonet is not fully manufactured?

I have some others abit more manufactured

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1388432516.389985.jpgImageUploadedByTapatalk1388432529.855537.jpg
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1388432704.855013.jpg

They where manufactured by a company in London, England

Rough guess around 35 years old, I maybe completely wrong though
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Old December 30, 2013, 03:12 PM   #5
Sidcass
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86 on the blade... Am I right in saying that's year of manufacture?
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Old December 30, 2013, 04:53 PM   #6
Sidcass
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I've been reading up the past few hours, trying to find out exactly which model, I've thought all along that it's the L1A4, but now I've read on other forums it could be L1A3, I'm trying to find the differences between the 2, also the "C" stamped in the grip, what's that mean?
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Old December 30, 2013, 05:00 PM   #7
Sidcass
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It sounds like my hours of research i have not found out very much.. Not very good at this am I
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Old December 30, 2013, 10:09 PM   #8
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personally, that looks like a standard Kabar combat knife without the handle.
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Old December 30, 2013, 10:29 PM   #9
James K
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There is no sign of any wood/plastic, a guard, or any screws/pins to hold scales or any way to hold it onto a rifle. I think it is as Mk VII says, a blade for a partially finished bayonet or combat knife. Those are frequently found in an area where such weapons were made, either carried off by the workmen or left when the factory was closed down and maybe demolished.

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Old December 31, 2013, 12:52 AM   #10
gyvel
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I think it's a pretty safe bet these are partially finished L1 bayonets of some variety.
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Old December 31, 2013, 01:14 PM   #11
Mk VII
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L1A2 was a production alternative, in that the pommel was flush riveted on instead of brazed or heat shrunk on. It was not, in the event, made in England although Australian and Canadian production used this method.
The L1A4 used this method as well. Hopkinsons (code SM) made this version which was not actually produced until the 1970s. H, R and C are markings known to be cast on the pommel; they probably represent sub-contractor's ident.
A large quantity of semi-finished parts came on the market about 20 years ago, they probably represent the leftovers after Hopkinson closed down.
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