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Old November 29, 2013, 02:30 PM   #1
Doc Hoy
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Just came up with three pistols

Off of the Gunbroker. Actually the auction was for four pistols, but one of them appears to be a completely rusted out relic. None of them are collectable pistols. But one in the bunch is a Regina .25 Automatic.

Can anyone tell me anything about this semi auto pistol?
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Old November 29, 2013, 02:42 PM   #2
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Here is a photo of the Regina

The listing says it is a clone of the Colt 1908. My guess is that you really have to use you imagination as regards internals.



Here is a photo of the three pistols plus the relic.

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Old November 29, 2013, 03:21 PM   #3
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it looks like its time to pound a few nails in the gun den wall. eastbank.
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Old November 29, 2013, 04:10 PM   #4
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The auto pistol is Spanish; the "Regina" (Queen) trademark was used by Gregorio Bolomburu. Regina pistols were made in both 7.65mm Browning (.32 ACP) and in 6.35mm Browning (.25 ACP). They fall into the general class of pistols lumped together under the "Ruby" name, many of which in 7.65mm were made for the French in WWI. They were later sold in this country and elsewhere at quite low prices. They are not high quality, being cheaply made of "pot metal" (cheap cast iron of the kind used for making cook pots), and are usually soft and not at all durable.

They are often compared to the Colt pocket or vest pocket pistols, but only in external appearance. There is no comparison in quality, the Colt being far superior. Internally, the .25 caliber pistols are quite different from the Colt or its Belgian FN clone. The latter pistols are striker fired and the safety blocks the sear. Spanish copies are almost invariably hammer fired and with a safety that blocks only the trigger, with the result that they can fire if dropped.

Value is around $25-50 and most gunshops won't sell them or take them on trade because of liability and warranty issues.

Jim
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Old November 29, 2013, 04:52 PM   #5
Doc Hoy
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How about parts for the Regina

I am already aware of parts problems for the Iver Johnson and Howard. Called Numrich for parts for a US Revolver today and was told they had two things, neither of which I need.

I gave a hundred and fifteen for the pistols. Happy to have them for the learning opportunity. The Regina shoots, but has feed problems.

So anyway, what is the story on parts for the semi auto?
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Old November 29, 2013, 05:31 PM   #6
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There is no "story" on parts for those guns, because there are none to be had, except by purchasing an identical gun in worse condition and cannibalizing it. As for "drop in", forget it. All those pistols were hand fitted (labor was a lot cheaper than precision machines) and parts don't always interchange even among guns from the same maker. If you are handy with tools, you can make most parts, but with gunsmith/machinist services running close to $100 an hour, having them made will cost a lot more than the gun is ever going to be worth.

Of course, I recently said the same thing about another old gun and the owner informed me that he had acquired all the parts needed to restore it at almost no cost, so "never say never"! Another has made parts for an old revolver, but he is a skilled machinist who could never pay his own hourly rate if he did it for someone else.

FWIW, the Howard was made by Meriden and I THINK they made the identical gun under the Meriden name. (Meriden itself was set up by Sears, Roebuck to make guns for them, but they apparently made guns for others as well.)

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Last edited by James K; November 29, 2013 at 05:41 PM.
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Old December 10, 2013, 08:35 AM   #7
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Update

Got these four pistols and the seller was correct. By far the best in the group is the .25 ACP. The pistol is in very good condition, good bore, operates as it should. Has magazine with it, but the seller said that the pistol does not feed properly guessing that the magazine is the problem. I examined the magazine and it does appear to be a bit worn. I'll try shooting it and also try coming up with a spare clip. This pistol is quite nice. Serial number on this pistol is 14980. I'd be much obliged if anyone has a serial number listing and can tell me the year of manuf. I have searched unsuccessfully online.

I was able to take parts from the Iver Johnson to complete the restoration of an Iver Johnson Tip-up that I was working on. The purchased revolver had nice grips and the ones on my existing revolver were in bad shape. Also swapped out the barrel and cylinder since the parts in the four pistol lot were in better shape externally. Took a minor bit of filing on the latch but it works well. The other three revolvers may have some parts in them that are worth having but I haven't examined them closely.
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Old December 15, 2013, 05:04 PM   #8
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Doc Hoy, the only way you are going to be able to find out when the Regina was made is if there is either a "rampant lion" or a "letter" date code on the gun.

Date coding began in 1927 with the letter "A" ("B"=1928, "C"=1929, "CH"=1930, etc. Coding is based on the Spanish alphabet.)

If it was made between 1923-1929 it will have a "rampant lion."

The letters "PV" were also used between 1923-1927.

FWIW, the Reginas were a slight cut above some of the less reputable Spanish made pistols of that era, but probably not as good as a genuine Astra or Gabilondo.

Interestingly enough, one seldom encounters Spanish automatics in near-new condtion; They always seem to have had very hard lives which leads me to believe they aren't as bad as everyone says they are.
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Old December 15, 2013, 07:49 PM   #9
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Unable to find a rampant Lion.

There is an "S" on the left side of the frame just behind the trigger. If they did not skip any letters that means 1947

ON the left side of the slide, the pistol is marked "Automatic Pistol Regina"

The metal seems of fairly good quality. The pistol is tight and the springs are still strong.
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Old December 16, 2013, 12:21 AM   #10
gyvel
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Quote:
There is an "S" on the left side of the frame just behind the trigger.
That's not the letter date code. That "S" means "Safe" (or "Seguro" in Spanish).

It's a pretty safe bet that your pistol was made before 1923.
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Old December 16, 2013, 03:32 AM   #11
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Now I get it...

It had an "F" on the left side too.

The F is real close to the S. If you put the Safety over the S you can see the F and vice versa.

I just figured they could not decide if it was made in 47 or 36 so they marked it with both letters.

.

.


.

;o)


As Popeye said, " Guuuhh, That's embaraskin.
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Old December 16, 2013, 09:24 AM   #12
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As indicated the .25 was made before the introduction of the letter and letter/number code system and as for the Regina being scarce it is not at all collectable. Spanish guns of the period were farmed out to backyard parts makers, assemblers and engravers. Parts are different dimension in the same brand and most used low quality steel. And then there was the revolution! You have a nice bunch for a shadow box but none should become shooters once again as each was a marginal firearm when new (fortunately they are for low pressure cartridges). Get a Keltec or Ruger if you need a reliable pocket gun.
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Old December 16, 2013, 11:01 AM   #13
Doc Hoy
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Mikey

None of these will be shooters.

Not really interested in home defense or personal defense or concealed carry, (even though I do have a 1911 with five founds in a magazine close by.) If I was interested, as you recommend I would do some research regarding the weapon. I would get some retraining (26 years in the Navy isn't enough.) And I probably do some other preps as well.

As I said previously I was able to get some parts from the lot for other restorations. And they are not shooters either.

The Regina is the one which is closest to shootable condition, although I'd probably take it to a smith to get confirmation.
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Old December 16, 2013, 03:12 PM   #14
gyvel
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Quote:
The F is real close to the S. If you put the Safety over the S you can see the F and vice versa.
And, of course, the "F" is for "Fire" (Fuego in Spanish). As I said, it's a pretty safe bet the pistol was made before 1923
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Old December 16, 2013, 04:26 PM   #15
Doc Hoy
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Yeah I know.

That was my feeble attempt at humor to mask the fact that I missed the "S" meaning "Safe"
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