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Old January 15, 2001, 02:41 PM   #1
TimW
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Anyone order any of the WWII surplus .45 ammo that's been "stored overseas in sealed tins"? Claims are mildly corrosive (I am assuming corrosive primers). However, at about $80 per 700-800 rounds, this is inexpensive practice ammo...at about $0.10 per round, this is cheaper than one can reload, no?? And you get the cases to reload later....

I know, one buys a great weapon and decides to shoot cheap ammo out of it...however, since the way to get good is to practice a lot, then I opine that inexpensive ammo may be worth the extra scrubbing needed to neutralize the corrosive primers.

Or, please, point out my misconceptions...that's why I'm here.

Tim
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Old January 15, 2001, 03:34 PM   #2
Mike Irwin
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Tim,

Yes, mildly corrosive is corrosive. You have to clean the same way.

Mildly corrosive means that there isn't as much of the stuff that can draw water and cause rusting, but it's still there.

Where are you finding this ammo?

I may want to get myself some.
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Old January 15, 2001, 03:40 PM   #3
TimW
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It's listed all over Shotgun news. From what I understand, you need to clean with hot soapy water first in order to get the corrosive salts off, then clean as normal.

Tim
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Old January 15, 2001, 03:43 PM   #4
Dr.Rob
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That surplus ammo can be a little hot and its typically steel cased and berdan primed with a corrosive primer, don't use it in a gun youcan't completely take apart to clean.

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Old January 15, 2001, 04:23 PM   #5
Clayton Hufford
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I've fired well over a thousand rounds of the stuff with zero problems. It's good to go. Natchez sells it, as does Cheaper Than Dirt. I purchased mine from J&G Sales.
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Old January 16, 2001, 06:33 PM   #6
swatman
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How ya open them damn tins?
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Old January 16, 2001, 07:39 PM   #7
MBG
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I picked up a tin at a gun show last year, and shot maybe 40 rounds of it.

The loads were inconsistent, and much hotter than the PMC I was shooting. Light discoloration (rust) formed between the morning when I shot and that night when I cleaned.

I gave the rest to someone at the range, with a caveat on my experiences. To me, the risk to my guns was too great.

YMMV.

Marty
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Old January 16, 2001, 11:36 PM   #8
James K
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Hi, folks,

Dr. Rob, that ammo is corrosive, but it is U.S. GI and not Berdan primed. It may be steel cased, and steel cased ammo is hard to reload and hard on reloading dies.

Anyone who believes that that ammo is "mildly corrosive" believes in a woman being "mildly pregnant." It is corrosive as h-ll and cleaning the barrel is a must. Fortunately, tearing down the 1911 is easy.

The cans orginally came with an attached key, like the old sardine cans. Otherwise an ordinary can opener can be used.

Jim
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Old January 17, 2001, 03:03 PM   #9
ZeusOne
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Based on past experience buying loose boxes, I eagerly bought a tin. The stuff I got: It's original package surplus GI ball, brass case, boxer primed (i.e. reloadable). Mixed headstamps indicating U.S. 1941/42 manufacture (WWC, RP, etc).

Reliable. Accurate. Consistent. Recoil/shooting characteristics are much better than the usual cheap stuff.

Cheap - equates to less than $8/box of 50. Getting down close to roll-your-own cost, and lots of good brass to reload. More practice, for less.

Cleaning? Gotta do it anyway. The extra step is easy and quick, and anyone who shoots corro military surplus in other applications will find a .45 auto procedure almost pleasant in comparison.

Opening the tin? Less than 10 minutes with a hacksaw and pliers, and toss what's left of the can.

Heck, if I didn't reload, I'd buy more. Just might anyway!

Mind you, my experiences with the stuff I've bought, and in my guns.
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