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Old October 28, 2013, 11:02 AM   #1
stonewall50
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Bug Out Bag

I am starting to look for gear to make up an appropriate go bag. So I figure the first thing I need is a quality backpack. The reason I have settled on a backpack is because of the ease of carry. I may create a secondary duffle bag later, but for right now I need a backpack.

I am looking into different military bags because of they have been field tested. Can anyone direct me to some quality bags? Something you have used in the past? My requirements are for it to carry medical supplies, ammo, water, food, spare clothing, plant/insect guide, and other basic survival gear. Are there any things I may be overlooking in terms of importance? Like big pouch vs separate compartments? load bearing system? That kind of thing?
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Old October 28, 2013, 11:32 AM   #2
DMZX
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This would be perfect IMO:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ISSUED-MEDIU...-/300983958781

Inexpensive
Indestructible
Proven design
Utilitarian

Makes a decent pillow.
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Old October 28, 2013, 11:54 AM   #3
lcpiper
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I think I would start by approaching the problem from a decision making angle.

Regardless of why you have to "bug out", there is one very important factor that you should consider that would effect all your choices.

Will you still have an auto?

In any case, if you will still have a car, and if a car would still be a reliable source of transportation, then plastic tubs are just fine for many things.

If you think the situation could be so bad that a car would not be reliable, then you have two real problems;

First, you have to carry everything you are going to need, and second, you are going to need more then you are ever going to be able to carry.

The first situation is far more likely then the second. Throw valuables, important documents, self defense items, etc into some pouches that can go into a back pack and it's doesn't have to be huge or all military looking, just solid and functional. Second, extra cloths, food, ammo, etc can go in plastic tubs stored in the garage so they can quickly be loaded up in the back of a truck or SUV.

So your back pack is your "A" Bag, and the tubs are your "B" Bags. You can always through a few extra Army Ruck Sacks into one more tub if your auto isn't going to get you all the way to the promissed land.
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Old October 28, 2013, 01:06 PM   #4
stonewall50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lcpiper View Post
I think I would start by approaching the problem from a decision making angle.

Regardless of why you have to "bug out", there is one very important factor that you should consider that would effect all your choices.

Will you still have an auto?

In any case, if you will still have a car, and if a car would still be a reliable source of transportation, then plastic tubs are just fine for many things.

If you think the situation could be so bad that a car would not be reliable, then you have two real problems;

First, you have to carry everything you are going to need, and second, you are going to need more then you are ever going to be able to carry.

The first situation is far more likely then the second. Throw valuables, important documents, self defense items, etc into some pouches that can go into a back pack and it's doesn't have to be huge or all military looking, just solid and functional. Second, extra cloths, food, ammo, etc can go in plastic tubs stored in the garage so they can quickly be loaded up in the back of a truck or SUV.

So your back pack is your "A" Bag, and the tubs are your "B" Bags. You can always through a few extra Army Ruck Sacks into one more tub if your auto isn't going to get you all the way to the promissed land.
Yes I agree. And we actually already have several cases of ammo and such stored. We even have stuff for our dog. He is a black lab and his nose could be useful. The boxes are closed up and duct taped.

I agree though about the bag A not being enough. That is why I plan on storing things that aid in gathering of food and water (iodine tablets plus a proper water filter and some supplies to boil water, fishing gear because I live in Florida, and then some basic snare and hunting supplies...and that field guide to ID plants). The clothing and such would be basic...socks, underwear, and stuff for the cold and maybe 1 change in case my clothes are wet
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Old October 28, 2013, 01:11 PM   #5
ClydeFrog
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lopo-rucks....

If you want to "ruck & roll", Id suggest these sources;
www.llbean.com www.cabelas.com www.blackhawk.com www.cryeprecision.com www.uscav.com www.csmgear.com www.galls.com www.5.11tactical.com www.policehq.com www.deltaforce.com www.natchezss.com .
Blackhawk was started by a retired US Navy SEAL. 5.11 Tactical is popular with many PSCs/para-military types.

Some Youtube.com "preppers" & survivalists advise against any gear or clothing that's too "military" or gung-ho saying you should maintain a low profile.
That's not bad advice if you are in a urban area & you don't want any undue attention from looters or street gangs but I wouldn't be leery of using military gear if it works best for your needs.

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Old October 28, 2013, 04:08 PM   #6
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I have two back-packs I use for hiking. Bought both of them at Walmart - about $60 each. They are light weight, water resistant, easy on the back to carry long distances - it works for me.

Having said that, I'm not a big proponent of bug-out-bags. Unless you have a specific destination where you can escape urban chaos, I don't know what you all these people with BUG's are going to do - roam the streets begging for food and water? My house and a little cabin I have in the Appalachian mountains are my bug-out-bags. If I can't get to my cabin, then I plan on staying in my house; and vice versa.
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Old October 28, 2013, 05:25 PM   #7
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Ready.gov ....

I agree with the last post.
The first thing you need is a plan.
Im not able to run to a "secure location" or shelter like on some of the unscripted TV series on TLC or Discovery.
I would set up a 3 day/72 hour supply of water, food, supplies, weapons, ammuntion etc if things in my urban area go really sideways. Like a Katrina or Super-Storm Sandy.
www.Ready.gov is a good example of what to plan for.
I might get a Henry AR-7 camo .22LR & scope for dire emergencies/back-up & some MREs to pack in my Jeep Liberty.

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Old October 28, 2013, 08:06 PM   #8
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I think it is good to have a plan A, B, and C and so on.....I've been toying with the idea of having a bug-out bag for myself and my family.

However, it would be best to stay put for a long as possible. That is where everything is. The survival value of your four walls and roof of your own home simply cannot be overstated.
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Old October 28, 2013, 08:13 PM   #9
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Unless you live in the inner city, where becoming a refugee is perhaps a smart move, maybe what you actually need is a Get Home Bag, containing some walking shoes or boots, hat, coat, gloves, headlamp, handgun, ammo, some food and water, and $50 in cash and coins.
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Old October 28, 2013, 08:38 PM   #10
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Go to a really good tack store and find one of their canvas gear bags - best stuff out there and since it is NOT marked as some gun item, the price will be half or less. I have one, serious stainless zipper, heavy canvas with straps that are sewn all the way around the bag, etc. awesome stuff and really cheap AND made here in the US
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Old October 28, 2013, 08:57 PM   #11
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I'm in the camp that military gear, or stuff designed for law enforcement and military, are generally rugged, and well thought out.

If anyone thinks they'd be MORE of a target looking like they might be military, I would disagree.

First, you can hide/conceal better if you're wearing regional camouflage. Get a roll of camouflage netting to cover you, your camp, your vehicle, etc. Your best bet to survive is to evade during a huge disaster if .gov can't rescue you.

Second, do you think that people wearing BDUs with military rucksacks and rifles will be targeted before the group of pacifist non-military civilian looking people carrying their REI backpacks full of gear?

As far as bug in vs. bug out, I'm in the camp that you don't leave unless the environment forces you. You're much more vulnerable on the move, and there's more to go wrong.

Having studied and applied military tactics in training and real life, the doctrine is that you are most vulnerable during transit, subject to ambush.

Think about how easy it would be to stop a convoy of civilian cars. Any impediment brings the cars to a linear halt, boxed in, like fish in a barrel.

Odds for most people to survive on foot, bicycle, or horse would be very low also. The majority of people simply don't have the skills for survivability in the short or medium term. You'd have gear and water that might last a week without resupply. Any injury could be life-threatening.

Conversely, if you're smart, start building your home/fortress to weather any longterm storm. Build a network of like-minded people. You can bug in and weather all but the most dire situations (fire, flood, volcano, toxic attack...).
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Old October 28, 2013, 10:37 PM   #12
viciouskitty
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I use one of the military surplus alice packs, because I'm poor and I got em for free. I just need to get the pack frame, those bags are cheap and large enough to carry a decent amount of stuff on a budget. I have tried mine out wearing it for a couple hours trudging around the ranch and it's no fun, but it works. And those packs were able to hold enough food for 3 days a change of clothes, 500 rounds of 22lr, a small tool kit, a couple knives, flares, fire starting equipment, water purification tabs and other stuff in that category.
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Old October 28, 2013, 10:45 PM   #13
ClydeFrog
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Target(s), camo vs "regular" clothes....

Im not against military gear or uniforms per se, I could just see you being singled out or searched by any first responders/military troops.
If you are armed or are carrying ammunition & weapons you might need to defend yourself and/or your family members until LE or NG(national guard) get there.
In 2004, my area had four/04 major storms.
Power went out, streets were blocked, gas was delayed or unavailable. Some looting was reported in urban areas(stores supermarkets).
It wasn't as bad or chaotic as Katrina in NOLA or Super-Storm Sandy in NJ/NY but some of the local deputies, police & state troopers were frazzled after 3/4 days.
Sheriffs & police chiefs in the metro area were angry and making threats .
There was a lot of politics & posturing but I know there were a lot of confrontations & disputes with armed citizens and the first responders in Katrina.

I agree too that a "get home bag" or basic supplies in a motor vehicle are smart.

Clyde
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Old October 28, 2013, 11:39 PM   #14
stonewall50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skans View Post
I have two back-packs I use for hiking. Bought both of them at Walmart - about $60 each. They are light weight, water resistant, easy on the back to carry long distances - it works for me.

Having said that, I'm not a big proponent of bug-out-bags. Unless you have a specific destination where you can escape urban chaos, I don't know what you all these people with BUG's are going to do - roam the streets begging for food and water? My house and a little cabin I have in the Appalachian mountains are my bug-out-bags. If I can't get to my cabin, then I plan on staying in my house; and vice versa.
My home town is actually a good place to get too. And if not there I have several other locations I know about within the the state or SE that I could run too. I spend a lot of time on the road and I don't listen to the radio on long trips. I prefer to let the mind wander . I have locations picked out, but getting home is my best plan.

The point of the bag is to get me there if I were stranded somewhere I don't want to be (like a population center in south florida). My truck is my "get home" bag.

Last edited by stonewall50; October 28, 2013 at 11:49 PM.
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Old October 29, 2013, 07:28 AM   #15
Skans
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maybe what you actually need is a Get Home Bag, containing some walking shoes or boots, hat, coat, gloves, headlamp, handgun, ammo, some food and water, and $50 in cash and coins.
^^^I'm in this camp! I keep most of my camping supplies in my hiking/camping backpack for convenience anyway. This includes a filter bottle, micro stove, a can or two of fuel, some chlorine tabs, a bag of "Smarties", some packages of oatmeal, etc. Plenty of room for some shoes a gun, more food if it ever became necessary.

Quote:
If anyone thinks they'd be MORE of a target looking like they might be military, I would disagree.
Take a lesson from Katrina. The Cops were the biggest problem, targeting people for gun confiscation and herding them into Thunderdome, oh, I mean the Superdome. I wouldn't want to look "military" during a genuine disaster. Not unless you want to give all your stuff over to your trusting police department.

Last edited by Skans; October 29, 2013 at 07:35 AM.
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Old October 29, 2013, 07:33 AM   #16
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Old October 29, 2013, 08:16 AM   #17
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I'm more in the camp of keeping enough gear in my truck to get back home. In most natural, or man made disasers I have most of what I need to live at home off the grid for a very long time with no assistance. Blocked, or flooded roads might prevent me from driving home, but I want to be able to get back on foot, even if it means 2-3 days of walking. I keep a lightweight gun, snacks, water, and clothing to keep me warm and dry for the season in the bag.

If you can find one of the military issue 3 day assault packs at a good price they are about perfect. Be aware of the cheap knockoff's. A new one will cost right at $100 if it is any good. I have 3 that I have aquired used for as little as $25, so there are bargians if you keep your eyes open. You often see the old desert camo ones discounted pretty cheap in good shape. The new multi-cam or Army Digital versions are pricy.

https://www.google.com/search?source...+list&tbm=shop

Any pack will do though. You will probably be able to find something at backpacking website such as www.rei.com or www.campmor.com They work just as well and do look less like there might be a gun inside.
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Old October 29, 2013, 10:45 AM   #18
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Which ever one you choose, If you're not using a really good fitting frame, make sure it has stiffening stays in it and a wide sturdy hip belt.
Your shoulders and back will thank you.
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Old October 29, 2013, 11:17 AM   #19
DMZX
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I think that one should put a good deal of thought into what the objective is and use the most appropriate gear.

If the objective is to get from point A to point B, on foot, without being stopped, harassed, detained, searched, arrested, assaulted, robbed, etc., then recreational backpacking gear is probably not the best choice.

Good footwear, layered, subdued clothing and a medium, soft, subdued pack weighing no more than 50 lbs, is what will get you good distances (>15 miles per day/night), away from roads, using cover and concealment as much as practical.

99% of the risk and potential for trouble will be found on or near roads and highways.
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Old October 29, 2013, 12:24 PM   #20
Skans
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"away from roads" generally means trespassing on private land.....at a time when private land owners are very suspicious and protective. Also, I'm not sure how you would go about crossing fenced fields, swamps, thick jungle-like forest, etc. at 15 miles/day. You generally will need to be traveling over some sort of road for that kind of pace. Perhaps not Highways, but something more civilized than fields and jungle.
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Old October 29, 2013, 08:22 PM   #21
stonewall50
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Originally Posted by Skans View Post
^^^I'm in this camp! I keep most of my camping supplies in my hiking/camping backpack for convenience anyway. This includes a filter bottle, micro stove, a can or two of fuel, some chlorine tabs, a bag of "Smarties", some packages of oatmeal, etc. Plenty of room for some shoes a gun, more food if it ever became necessary.



Take a lesson from Katrina. The Cops were the biggest problem, targeting people for gun confiscation and herding them into Thunderdome, oh, I mean the Superdome. I wouldn't want to look "military" during a genuine disaster. Not unless you want to give all your stuff over to your trusting police department.
That is actually against federal law now. Thank GW Bush. It is the Vitter Amendment of the National security appropriations bill of 2007...which spawned from an earlier bill GWB got in the works after Katrina.
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Old October 29, 2013, 09:48 PM   #22
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People in the camp that think if you're wearing civilian stuff you won't be targeted for piracy or searches, yet wearing paramilitary gear will somehow single you out, - well I just disagree and feel the opposite.

Again, evading is easier if you are wearing military gear. And evading is most important.
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Old October 30, 2013, 11:19 PM   #23
ClydeFrog
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SERE....

I disagree with the E(evasion) concept.
In a large scale disaster like Katrina or Sandy, if you are darting around in camo with a bunch of guns, Id bet a dozen hot Krispy Kremes some spun out state trooper or frazzled cop will shoot you up.

First responders & sworn LE are not set up to deal with preppers or armed citizens who can support themselves in large scale emergencies.
To maintain a low profile & "blend in" with your surroundings/local populace could be your best bet. Some spec ops & outdoors types call it The Gray Man.

I advocate gun owners & 2A supporters address this issue with their local/state elected leaders. In a federal or state declared emergency gun owners(license holders) should be granted limited open carry status or be able to store/transport/carry guns for protection. If you need a shotgun or rifle & want to openly wear a sidearm(or 2) then a state LE officer or military service member couldn't detain or stop you w/o cause(looting, trespass, terrorism, crime, etc).
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Old October 30, 2013, 11:35 PM   #24
stonewall50
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I've gotten some good suggestions. I am looking just for a bag that can go hiking and can be used to store basic supplies if god forbid I ever am unable to get a vehicle and go. The most likely item I will use is the water or change of clothes. But I would like this bag to be able to keep me supplied for a few days.

I plan on eventually doing hikes at the 10-15 mile 1 way in the mountains if North Carolina. I figure if the bag can handle that...it will do anything else I need it to do.
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Old October 31, 2013, 12:53 AM   #25
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Have you looked at the Eberlestock line? many of them look like a normal hiking/camping backpack but they have a sleeve built into them for a rifle, and the sleeve can be rolled up and out of the way when the rifle is not in the bag. But its handy as you can leave a bolt action, lever action etc in the pack with the rest of your gear so all you have to do is grab the pack.

I think some of the more tactical versions can fit AR's and the like.
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