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Old October 8, 2013, 03:15 PM   #1
MikeGoob
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easy to understand print-out for first time shooter (sight picture)

I'm taking a few friends to the range for the FIRST time and I wanted to have a printout that shows the correct sight picture. Maybe some other useful info regarding 'how to aim' on a page that they can kind of keep as homework.

Any help? Thanks!
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Old October 8, 2013, 03:46 PM   #2
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http://pistol-training.com/archives/1361

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...dgun&FORM=IGRE
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Old October 8, 2013, 03:57 PM   #3
MikeGoob
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I think there might be some good instructions to be found in that second link. I was going crazy looking for the basics written out!
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Old October 9, 2013, 07:59 AM   #4
Qtiphky
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Front sight

The links above do a great job of showing how to hold. Lower the front sight into the rear sight and make sure the three dots are aligned and the target looks like a lollipop above the front sight. Then FOCUS on the front sight, not the target. You can't focus on both at the same time. The target will get fuzzy at this point, but it is correct. When I shoot and find myself not hitting where I think it should be going, I slow it down and go back to basics. Often times I find that I am focusing on the target and not the front sight. When I focus on the front sight, the shots come back where they should be hitting.
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Old October 9, 2013, 07:14 PM   #5
raimius
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How many production guns are zeroed for a 6 o'clock hold? How big is the target (e.g. how much lower do you have to aim from point of impact?) What distance is the zero?

On my newer production guns, using the "lollipop" 6 o'clock hold would result in hitting the bottom of the circle.
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Old October 10, 2013, 08:50 PM   #6
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I don't think any production firearm is zero'd for a 6 oclock hold. Most people buy handguns for defense not comp. A 6 oclock hold doesn't really have any value in combat...not to me anyway.
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Old October 12, 2013, 04:42 PM   #7
Lost Sheep
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Here's my take on it:

Take a couple of sheets of card stock (the cardboard stiffeners included in reams of copy paper are good for this)

Draw a circular target on one.

cut the other into two sights, one front and one rear.

Front sight an inch wide and 2" tall with the rest of the card forming a handle so you can move it around easily.

The rear sight 1.5" wide and 1.5" deep, also with a handle for moving it around easily. The two handles should be oriented so they don't interfere with one another.

Lay the target on a table and "acquire" the sight picture as you would any firearm, putting the front sight on target and the rear sight centered (following the generally accepted rule of keeping focused on the front sight).

Have your student demonstrate the same thing until it becomes second nature.

Note that all this visualization/practice is with the 3 pieces of cardboard in the same plane.

Then, separate the target from the sights' plane by about a foot. Then as understanding increases, separate the front and rear sights.

Then, start moving the target around while the student "tracks" with the sights.

Now, mount the "sights" on a ruler or yardstick, essentially forming a paper and wood firearm. You can watch (evaluate and critique) the student manipulate the "firearm" easily because your eye is right there with (or as) the target.

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Old October 12, 2013, 04:48 PM   #8
Lost Sheep
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A "few" friends?

If you are not an experienced instructor, I would suggest one-on-one.

I know nothing of you, your friends, your range, so am suggesting the absolute safest teaching method I can think of. For a novice, I usually start with my airgun and pellets at home, still including eye protection and even ear protection (for realism because the range trip will include earmuffs).

Good luck and bless you for bringing non-shooters into the fold.

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