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Old September 17, 2013, 01:56 PM   #1
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Savage 1920 .300 Savage

Looking for general information about the Savage 1920 rifle. A friend just got one in .300Sav.

We know the gun was made from 1920 to 1931 (or 29, depending on source)
.250-3000 and .300 Savage
Came in two variants, apparently after 25-26 Savage increased the stock(?) and barrel size to add weight due to complaints about recoil in .300 Sav.

Friends gun has apparently been reblued, has a peep sight, no dovetail on the barrel for a rear sight.

Curious thing, there are no marking on the barrel, not even caliber. I suspect the barrel might be a replacement, because of that.

Looking for general info about these rifles, and particularly what markings ought to be on them, and where.

Any help would be useful, Thanks!
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Old September 17, 2013, 05:23 PM   #2
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.

Your friend most probably has a post-1925 Model 1920/20 - which has a slightly heavier bbl & a redesigned stock with different checkering than the earlier version(s), and QD sling swivel eyes ILO the previous non-detachable sling loops.

The gun's weight at that time was increased from 5lb, 14oz to 6-3/4lbs (half in the stock, half in the bbl) to increase the accuracy with 180gr .300 Sav boolits.

The issue 24" .300 Sav bbl's weren't dovetailed for an open rear sight when the factory supplied a Lyman 54 peep sight on the rifle.

All models were set up for clip-loading, even though their chamberings were AFAIK never offered loaded in enbloc clips.



.
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Old September 18, 2013, 09:30 AM   #3
Mike Irwin
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A barrel without markings?

That's not right. Savage stamped the barrels.
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Old September 18, 2013, 11:01 AM   #4
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As usual, it is going to take pictures.

'The Rifle in America' by Phil Sharpe describes the rifle but not markings.
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Old September 18, 2013, 11:32 AM   #5
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I'm working from memory and the very few pictures that I've found on the web that show barrel markings, but the left side of the barrel near the receiver SHOULD be marked "Savage Hi-Pressure Steel" and the cartridge for which it is chambered.

The top left of the receiver should be marked SAVAGE Model 20 just off top center, with the serial number under that.

A Savage Model 20 in .300 is another one of my bucketlist rifles.
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Old September 19, 2013, 11:46 AM   #6
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Thanks for the replies and the info, will pass it along to my friend. Pics are going to be more difficult, but if I can get him to take some (in a format I can use) I'll post them.
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Old September 19, 2013, 05:01 PM   #7
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They are really neat rifles, but they do kick.

Sort of like the Ithaca Featherweight. Great to carry, but not so great for a full day shooting doves or clays.
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Old September 20, 2013, 02:20 PM   #8
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What does the stock look like? Not 100% sure, but I thought the earlier rifles had the schnabel stock and the later 1920/26 rifles had a round forearm tip.
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Old September 21, 2013, 03:26 PM   #9
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It has a Schnabel forend, and that pre-WWII kind of checkering style. (not sure the proper name for that style)
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