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Old September 28, 2013, 08:58 AM   #1
Larry K
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Join Date: September 26, 2013
Location: Bella Vista Arkansas
Posts: 21
practice sessions

How many here run periodic practice sessions to help improve your times?
Have just joined here, and have been shooting IDPA for the past 6 months,
started at once per month, currently at twice per month ( different ranges )
and looks like a third range is going into IDPA ( so might give me almost once per week chance to shoot). Not looking to compete against these statewide or national guys, but sure would like to give the locals in my class a run ( well and not look like a total noob).
Currently shooting a S&W M&P9 full size, but have just picked up a Sig 1911 in .45 ( POW/MIA edition). which I intend to use as well.

So any thoughts? 3 times a month enough or do you practice drills regularly or occasionally?

My weak points right now are in the Standards stages specifically single hand shooting, my left (weak hand) is the worst, I shake badly ( not an issue of nervousness, just a family trait).
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Last edited by Larry K; September 28, 2013 at 01:38 PM.
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Old September 28, 2013, 05:00 PM   #2
g.willikers
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The problem with depending only on matches to improve, is the lack of opportunity for the repetition it takes to correct mistakes.
If you have somewhere that allows IDPA type practice, it really pays to work on weak points, over and over and.......
Not something that can be done at matches alone.
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Old September 28, 2013, 06:14 PM   #3
Bultaco
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Join Date: September 25, 2013
Location: Western Co.
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It will help you a lot if you chose 1 or 2 items to work on & spend a range day just on them. I will often do the drill with an empty gun first before I start making noise. Stay focused on each shot you fire. Stop between magazines & think about what you just did & if you need to change it. Changes start by moving slowly to get the skill down right before speed is added. You can also learn a lot from dry firing at home. My rule is no live ammo on the same floor of the house I am dry firing on.
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Old September 28, 2013, 10:05 PM   #4
Larry K
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Join Date: September 26, 2013
Location: Bella Vista Arkansas
Posts: 21
good points all guys, thanks, work on smooth and correct first, speed will follow as many have said. May not be the fastest, but hopefully wont hear "FINGER" or "MUZZEL".
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Old September 28, 2013, 10:58 PM   #5
Claude Clay
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Join Date: March 14, 2007
Location: CT
Posts: 314
seems you have range time and know the general rules.

so time to get a timer so you can practice on your own
the timer will also show you how much faster the 1911 is than a stricker fired gun...if you can 'operate' it as it is intended.

break the practice into stages; 40% 2 handed, 30 each strong only and weak only.
practice the draw to low ready ( can be done at home) than at the range practice from low ready to fire/not fire with ammo and multiple targets. when you are comfortable with draw to fire practice deliberate motions -- learn muscle memory and be smooth. no need to push for speed as smooth will become fast on its own.
enjoy
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Old September 30, 2013, 06:35 PM   #6
Larry K
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Join Date: September 26, 2013
Location: Bella Vista Arkansas
Posts: 21
Quote:
seems you have range time and know the general rules.

so time to get a timer so you can practice on your own
the timer will also show you how much faster the 1911 is than a stricker fired gun...if you can 'operate' it as it is intended.

break the practice into stages; 40% 2 handed, 30 each strong only and weak only.
practice the draw to low ready ( can be done at home) than at the range practice from low ready to fire/not fire with ammo and multiple targets. when you are comfortable with draw to fire practice deliberate motions -- learn muscle memory and be smooth. no need to push for speed as smooth will become fast on its own.
enjoy
Just download a nice little timer app on my android, should fit the bill nicely, provided for setting a Par time, and calibrating for dry fire. Expect to use that along with yours and a number of others suggestions.

Damn, still gotta find a decent holster for the IDPA shoots. What do y'all think about the Blackhawk series retention type holsters? I currently have one of those for my M&P, and my P229, however my carry holster (P229) is a remora. Currently have been using a soft side OWB slightly padded holster for the M&P for the IDPA shoots just because it seemed faster to draw from. Have found it causes me more time than it saves me, so am planning on going back to the Blackhawk, and disabling the retention capability. I like that it rides higher, and presents the pistol for a better initial grip.
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