The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The North Corral > Competition Shooting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old September 20, 2014, 05:44 PM   #1
ammo.crafter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 25, 2006
Location: the Garden State
Posts: 780
Speed on Steel

I competed in my first Speed on Steel shoot last week and had a blast. My main problem was using my PPC gun, Ruger MK1 with red dot sight). The second or two it took me to find the dot cost me dearly.

I have a Volquartsen LLV upper on the gun and I usually score in the top 5% at PPC. Though I did not do poorly in the steel shoot I do need different sights. Because of vision problems, open sight would not work for me.

Any suggestions that are not too costly would be greatly appreciated.
__________________
"The Constitution is not an instrument for government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government, lest it come to dominate our lives and interests."
Patrick Henry, American Patriot
ammo.crafter is offline  
Old September 20, 2014, 11:51 PM   #2
JohnKSa
Staff
 
Join Date: February 12, 2001
Location: DFW Area
Posts: 18,339
My 2 cents is that the sight is probably ok as it is. I think you just need to practice enough so that when the gun comes up, the sight is already on target (or very close to being on target) so you don't have to "find" the dot.

A few hundred presentations with an empty gun should do it.
__________________
Did you know that there is a TEXAS State Rifle Association?
JohnKSa is offline  
Old September 21, 2014, 07:52 AM   #3
Shotgun Slim
Member
 
Join Date: March 9, 2014
Location: Va
Posts: 50
+ 1 on his 2 cents. Make finding that dot a priority in your practice. I recommend using both eyes open and looking at the target(shotgun style). You might find you amaze yourself.
Shotgun Slim is offline  
Old September 21, 2014, 09:52 AM   #4
g.willikers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 28, 2008
Posts: 5,155
Most folks generally think dot sights are easy to use and cure all problems.
They aren't, and actually exaggerate flaws in technique.
But they are also a great training tool for perfecting one's technique.
Get it right and the dot is right there.
Get it wrong and you instantly know it.
But there are differences in dot scopes, too.
The tube type is much easier to use.
The tube, itself, greatly helps align things with the target.
Although, once you get the hang of it, the design is less important.
__________________
Lock the doors, they're coming in the windows.
g.willikers is online now  
Old Yesterday, 06:59 AM   #5
mxsailor803
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 8, 2010
Location: Norfolk, Va
Posts: 744
I had a MK1 setup similar to yours and had the same problem initially. It took a lot of empty gun drills to get the sight picture I needed to be consistent. Another thing I did was swapped on a set of Hogue target grips to help make sure my grip was consistent. Don't rule the red dot out just yet.
mxsailor803 is offline  
Old Yesterday, 08:04 AM   #6
ammo.crafter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 25, 2006
Location: the Garden State
Posts: 780
THX

Thanks to all for the good advice. Practice, practice, practice.
BTW I do have Hogue grips on the MK1.
__________________
"The Constitution is not an instrument for government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government, lest it come to dominate our lives and interests."
Patrick Henry, American Patriot
ammo.crafter is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.06407 seconds with 9 queries