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Old August 31, 2013, 09:41 AM   #1
thelanefam
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Civil war springfield questions

I have the opportunity to buy a Springfield rifle which was used in civil war. It comes with some provenance to prove it, but I just need some help in determining exactly what it is and what I should spend. So please any help would be appreciated. The lock plate has the usual eagle and US on it then at back of lock plate it says SPRING FIELD 1828. It has been converted to percussion. Stamped H & P near nipple. Barrel is stamped 1862 with a P and another obscure stamp. I wish I had more info, but at the time I was unsure what to look for. I think it's a 1822 conversion. So I guess what I'm asking is what exactly should I be looking for next time I get to handle it and what is it possibly worth. Thank youimage.jpg
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Old August 31, 2013, 09:43 AM   #2
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Other pics

Another pic
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Old August 31, 2013, 09:44 AM   #3
thelanefam
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One more

One more. Feel free to pm to discuss if you want to.
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Old August 31, 2013, 10:39 AM   #4
4V50 Gary
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The lockplate may be older and made for an antebellum musket. The barrel is new and has the adjustable sight of the 1861 Springfield. It appears that the lock was recycled to meet war's demand. How about a picture of the lockplate?

BTW, I've seen these go for $1,200-$2,000.
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Old August 31, 2013, 11:27 AM   #5
thelanefam
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Thank you

Thank you for quick reply. The three pictures are all that I have of it. Was it a common practice to reuse parts.
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Old August 31, 2013, 12:17 PM   #6
Hawg
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Its a converted 1816 musket by Hewes & Phillips. 1200 might be a little much but then it is a nice looking rifle so it may not be entirely out of the question. The hammer screw is missing. If I was buying it I'd want to know if the threads were damaged or if the old screw was broken off in it before I bought it tho.
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Old August 31, 2013, 02:49 PM   #7
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The demand for small arms during the Civil War was great. So long as the old parts conformed with the 1861 Springfield, they were re-used. Then again, many old smoothbore muskets were issued during the early years of the war and if parts fitted them, they were good to go too.
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Old August 31, 2013, 09:11 PM   #8
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I agree with Hawg, it's a Hewes & Phillips 2nd type conversion with that stamped bolster (the first type had a clean out screw in the bolster) something like 12,000 altered like that. No idea about a current price, got mine near 10 years ago at auction for under $600.00. The flint to cap conversions were not popular at that time with most collectors.
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Old August 31, 2013, 10:27 PM   #9
thelanefam
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You guys are a wealth of knowledge and been a big help so far. I won't get to see the owner for a couple of weeks but I will be sure to let you know how I fair. If any more info on this piece it is still appreciated
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Old September 1, 2013, 10:07 AM   #10
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Is it rifled or smoothbore?

There is considerable demand for H&P 1816 conversions in N-SSA shooting because they have just disallowed converting originals to the H&P configuration to allow a rear sight (H&Ps had a rear sight).

People are now getting such accurate loads with smoothbores that the rear sight is beneficial.

Steve
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Old September 1, 2013, 01:48 PM   #11
Hawg
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Most of the H&P's were rifled but there were some that weren't.
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