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Old August 18, 2013, 05:29 PM   #26
Sevens
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Hey photoman12001, terrific photos, gorgeous guns, great props and a joy to look at. Especially from a guy like me who knows what a fine gun looks like and yet fails nearly every time he attempts to snap a picture of one.

Constructive criticism, though: your HUGE script copyright notice takes away from the picture... big time. It's so large that it draws attention away from the subject. It's what I remember most about each picture. Worse when it goes over, through or otherwise pollutes part of the subject matter.

Just my opinion, not meant in any nasty manner.
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Old August 18, 2013, 05:34 PM   #27
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6" in .357 is a good compromise between the original 8 inches and up barrels and the 4 inch, which offers greater handling ease at the cost of velocity. Especially if carrying is not a real consideration.
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Old August 18, 2013, 06:46 PM   #28
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I like the all. I have 2 4 inch guns (one S&W Mod 67-1 in .38 Spcl., and a 4 inch Colt Python.), one 6 inch gun (S&W Mod 28-2 in .357 Mag.), and a 10 1/2 inch Colt Python. The last one has been fired less than 4 times since it was made. For my shooting it is too heavy in the front. All the others I love to shoot just the same.

Though my true preference is a 6.5 inch single action for revolvers. It has the right feel in my hand. Though it is a matter of preference on my part.
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Old August 18, 2013, 06:48 PM   #29
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I prefer the 4" barrel

Longer barrels will shoot better* than shorter, but I prefer the convenience of the shorter.


* There's a smart aleck in every crowd that will attempt to prove me wrong. And oftentimes succeed.
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Old August 18, 2013, 08:24 PM   #30
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Quote:
I have a Freedom Arms that was made about 18 months ago in .357 Mag ...and broke a firing pin ...because I dry fired it -- and their instructions said not to do it !! )....and I screwed up! If you dry fire a Freedom Arms -you need snap caps.
Sorry to hear about that.

So does that mean that if you are at the range and have a Dirty Harry moment, "did I shoot 5 or 6", you run the risk of damaging your gun if the answer is 6? If that is the case, that seems like a design disadvantage particularly if comparable competitive designs are robust to the occasional dry fire.

I have a 22 rifle that takes 18 in the tube. I always loose count. That gun as far as I know is still ok with the occasional dry fire which indicates it needs more ammo. But I definitely would not do it over and over though.
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Old August 18, 2013, 08:30 PM   #31
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So does that mean that if you are at the range and have a Dirty Harry moment, "did I shoot 5 or 6", you run the risk of damaging your gun if the answer is 6? If that is the case, that seems like a design disadvantage particularly if comparable competitive designs are robust to the occasional dry fire.
Firstly firing pin doesn't brake from a few dry fire shots, it take A LOT more. Secondly on the range you still have empty cases in the cylinder which at least partially, if not fully compensate...
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Old August 18, 2013, 08:45 PM   #32
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Right. Should have thought of that . Nice things about revolvers is you get to choose when the brass leaves.

Last edited by Dave1911; August 18, 2013 at 08:53 PM.
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Old August 18, 2013, 09:16 PM   #33
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I actually felt the 6" was more balanced and more like the 1911 I am used to compared to the 3" or 4" models which to me felt "back" heavy.
You really answered your own question - but asking is entertaining and informative. Welcome to the forum, we are here to help!

As to dry firing it is common courtesy to ask first. Personally if someone dry fired a gun of mine without asking they would never fire a gun of mine again, dry or live.

When in a shop and "feeling" the trigger of a perspective revolver purchase I put my left thumb in between the hammer and frame so it doesn't slam down on the frame or firing pin. Unnecessary in most cases but just something I do.
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Old August 18, 2013, 09:19 PM   #34
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AND I have to call BS on a previously posted statement:
Quote:
Taurus specifically recommends against dry firing their revolvers.
Wrong!:

http://www.taurususa.com/faq-results.cfm?faqID=24
Quote:
CAN I DRY FIRE MY TAURUS?

Yes, except for the .22 caliber pistols which includes models 94 and 941.

.22 caliber revolvers such as models 94 and 941 also should not be dry fired.

AFAIK no .22 revolver of any brand should be dry fired.
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Old August 18, 2013, 09:25 PM   #35
photoman12001
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I always place my thumb in front of the hammer when dry-firing a gun that isn't mine as well.

Per Ruger's FAQs on their website:
Q: Can I dry fire my Ruger revolver?
A: Yes. All Ruger revolvers can be dry fired without damage, and dry firing can be useful to familiarize the owner with the firearm. However, be sure any firearm is completely unloaded before dry firing!

I dry-fire my SP101 sometimes and I've never pinged the cylinder. I would not do this with my S&W rimfires though.

From S&W's FAQs:

Q: Can I dry fire my Smith & Wesson?
A: Yes, except for the .22 caliber pistols which includes models 22A, 22S, 422, 2206, 2214, 2213 and 41.
.22 caliber revolvers such as models 17, 43, 63, 317 and 617 also should not be dry fired.

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Old August 19, 2013, 11:10 AM   #36
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On my Freedom Arms revolver.....it was dry fired less than 50 times...and the firing pin broke.../ in fact I don't think I'd fired more than 10 boxes thru the gun / and the pin broke when I had cartridges in it, and I was firing the gun, at the range.

The good side of this - with their new guns in the last 4 or 5 yrs - they have a removable bushing in them - that is easy to remove and replace the firing pin. ( and since I had to get a replacement from the factory / I ordered a 2nd one - just in case).
----------
My gun holds 5 - large frame - but no, firing the gun on an already fired cyclinder should not bottom out the firing pin - or so the factory tells me. I probably have close to 100 boxes thru the gun since I broke the firing pin ( I rarely count my shots - and routinely fire a 6th time - as I'm practicing - and I have not broken a 2nd firing pin).
---------
the Freedom Arms 4 3/4" ....
http://thefiringline.com/forums/atta...0&d=1339790943

In my opinion - the firing pin design on the Freedom arms is certainly strong...and while they probably intended the design to make sure they did not get any light primer strikes - the way to prevent it from breaking, was to believe the manual when it said use snap caps...so it was my fault, not the design in my view. A Freedom Arms revolver - is a very strong gun. But the point is, not all center fire calibers can be dry fired without snap caps. If you are considering a single action revolver...the balance on this 4 3/4" is almost perfect ( although its heavy at 55 oz ) ....and its perfect in .357 mag...and would be good in .44 mag as well.../ it might be a little light in .454 Casull or .475 Linebaugh...where I'd want at least a 6" for the extra weight.

Some 4" and 6" revolvers...( all S&W ) ...

http://thefiringline.com/forums/atta...5&d=1357929955

686 6" at upper left, blued gun is a model 27 6", a pair of model 66's in 4" at the upper right / a pair of model 19's ( Nickel) at lower right.

Last edited by BigJimP; August 19, 2013 at 11:27 AM.
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Old August 19, 2013, 12:46 PM   #37
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Dry firing a revolver won't hurt anything. Neither will test driving a car. In both cases however, its best to ask first.
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Old August 19, 2013, 02:41 PM   #38
lee n. field
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Quote:
AND I have to call BS on a previously posted statement:
Quote:
Taurus specifically recommends against dry firing their revolvers.
Wrong!:

http://www.taurususa.com/faq-results.cfm?faqID=24
Quote:
CAN I DRY FIRE MY TAURUS?

Yes, except for the .22 caliber pistols which includes models 94 and 941.

.22 caliber revolvers such as models 94 and 941 also should not be dry fired.

AFAIK no .22 revolver of any brand should be dry fired.
Taurus' revolver manual specifically recommends against it.

My experience was that dry firing my old (late 80s vintage) model 66 eventually mashed the firing pin spring into uselessness.
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Old August 19, 2013, 03:28 PM   #39
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Quote:
My experience was that dry firing my old (late 80s vintage) model 66 eventually mashed the firing pin spring into uselessness.
That's with empty chambers, no snap caps, right?
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Old August 19, 2013, 05:41 PM   #40
lee n. field
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That's with empty chambers, no snap caps, right?
correct.
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Old August 21, 2013, 09:34 AM   #41
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You might take a look at the 8 3/8" S&W revolvers. My M57 is my most accurate. I suspect that the sight radius has a lot to do with it as well as a most excellent trigger. I do prefer a 4" for woods bumming, but I have carried the 8 3/8" in a chest rig which I find quite comfortable in the warmer months.

Folks love their 8 3/8" M27....

I do shoot 6" or longer barrels a little better than 4" revolvers. I believe it is a consistancy issue with me.

With the GP-100, I really like the 3" version versus the 4", but either are just fine.

Handled a 5" S&W 686 and just loved it. It was a special run for Bass Pro and I passed. I regret not buying one today.

As far as dry firing a revolver or any gun for that matter in the store..... ask first. If the gun is a collector grade gun, the store may well have an absolute fit if you dry fired it. Generally not a good idea to dry fire 22 revolvers. If I am buying a gun to shoot and I am pretty well sold on getting it (price and so forth), I will almost always dry fire the gun in the store. But I will be past the "just looking" stage at that point.

Dry firing a revolver will mark up the cylinder (drag line) and some folks simply don't want to see a drag line on a new purchase. For a shooter, regardless of being new or used, I have no problem with honest wear.
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Old August 21, 2013, 11:31 AM   #42
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What brand are those cartridge cases, Photoman? I don't think I've ever seen one that orients the cartridges for a speedloader like that.
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Old August 31, 2013, 11:15 AM   #43
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Constructive criticism, though: your HUGE script copyright notice takes away from the picture... big time. It's so large that it draws attention away from the subject. It's what I remember most about each picture. Worse when it goes over, through or otherwise pollutes part of the subject matter.
I've never been 100% happy with that signature. While I was in Alaska last week a friend asked me to add some text to a photo of his and I worked out something different for mine based on his request. Better?




Quote:
What brand are those cartridge cases, Photoman? I don't think I've ever seen one that orients the cartridges for a speedloader like that.
Those speed loaders and blocks are from these guys. They are costly but really nice. I have blocks/loaders for my S&W 617, both 63s and my Ruger SP101. The fact that they make blocks to fit in those Pelican boxes is awesome. The 1050 case holds two blocks, one block fits in the 1040.

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Old August 31, 2013, 01:39 PM   #44
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I've never been 100% happy with that signature. While I was in Alaska last week a friend asked me to add some text to a photo of his and I worked out something different for mine based on his request. Better?
Definitely better!
I, for one, really enjoy all the accoutrements added to a photo, especially when they are well-picked. I find it more enjoyable and interesting to look at the little bits & pieces so for me... a copyright overstamped on the accessories and other items in the pictures may as well just be over the firearms themselves.

I am a realist, I would imagine the idea is not to put the copyright so small and so far tucked in a corner that some schmuck couldn't simply crop the borders a bit and eliminate it.
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Old September 1, 2013, 02:46 PM   #45
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I have 686s with 4'', 5'' and 6'' barrels. all are full underlug. The one that is easiest to throw in the glove box, in a back-pack or under the seat is the 4''. The one that feels the best balanced and the one I prefer is the 5''. The one I shoot the best and is the most pleasant to shoot for extended periods of time is the 6''. The 6'', while many claim feels initially front heavy or awkward, is the one most folks prefer to shoot again at the range.
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Old September 1, 2013, 04:33 PM   #46
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Old September 4, 2013, 04:56 PM   #47
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Quote:
I have 686s with 4'', 5'' and 6'' barrels. all are full underlug. The one that is easiest to throw in the glove box, in a back-pack or under the seat is the 4''. The one that feels the best balanced and the one I prefer is the 5''. The one I shoot the best and is the most pleasant to shoot for extended periods of time is the 6''. The 6'', while many claim feels initially front heavy or awkward, is the one most folks prefer to shoot again at the range.
I agree with above.
I own a 686 4inch, have shot the 5 inch with unfluted cylinder...Nice piece!, and my bro in law has the 6 inch.
BTW, the balance of the gun will change with 6 or 7 rounds of ammo in the cylinder.
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Old September 4, 2013, 10:16 PM   #48
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I have 686's in 3", 4", 6", & 8 3/8" - Okay, the 6" is a Python - close enough.

Anyway, I really like the balance of the 4" overall. Although, the muzzle-heavy 6" and 8" guns suddenly feel more "balanced" when full-house 357 Mag rounds are flying out of them

But yeah, I'll take the 4" all day (the 3" has a nice feel to it too); and the chronograph shows little velocity gain after the 4".
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Old September 5, 2013, 02:24 PM   #49
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I recently purchased a 4" S&W 686+ for a woods/HD/target/plinking gun and I love this gun. I dithered over whether to get the 4" or 6". My son has a 6" S&W 686 and to me it was just too muzzle heavy. In my hand the 4" is much better balanced. The 4" is also easier to carry and deploy in a woods role when hiking and fishing here in the Wyoming mountains. For me the 4" was the right choice. A curiosity is that with my 686+ I shoot tighter groups one-handed than two-handed.

I always ask if it is okay to dry fire. I haven't been told "no" yet but I don't abuse the permission by dry firing an excessive number of times. I think that if I was told "no" I would respond that I want to try the trigger before I buy and if you won't let me dry fire then I'll have to go somewhere else where they will and spend my money with them.
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Old September 7, 2013, 10:36 PM   #50
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You shouldn't HAVE to fire.....

You shouldn't HAVE to dry fire a 686. Their calling card is a very sweet trigger both in SA and DA. HOWEVER, some of the ones they are throwing out now due to the shortage may have gritty triggers, but either it will smooth out or S&W will fix if it is a warranty thing. I do find the 6" to be a little nose heavy, but being a range gun and having Pachmahr grips that I like on it, it feels great to shoot. I'm just a little prejudiced maybe, but if I lost my 686 I wouldn't rest until I found another.
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