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Old July 29, 2013, 11:05 PM   #1
savagest
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Trigger reset practice.

I practiced trigger reset shooting with my glock 23 at the range the other day and all I have to say is that it makes a huge difference. I still have a long ways to go when it comes to handgun shooting but just doing the reset practice makes trigger pull so much nicer.

Just saying.
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Old July 30, 2013, 01:22 AM   #2
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For me, reset matters as much as the trigger pull does. With a gun that has a short, sharp reset it's so much easier to shoot accurate and fast follow-up shots.
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Old July 30, 2013, 06:39 AM   #3
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You may find Rob Leatham's (look him up if you don't know who he is) comments on the importance of the "trigger reset" technique enlightening.

Starts at about 2:35 in the video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqqhSSiU_j8
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Old July 30, 2013, 09:51 AM   #4
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My connection on my phone isn't good enough to load the video, but I'm guessing it refers to the fact that Rob Leatham doesn't use the reset? I've heard that before; I had an experienced shooter deride my preference for a good reset by using Rob Leatham as an example. Which got me wondering, so I asked a few instructor and high-level competition shooter friends of mine. They pointed out that Rob is relatively unique and that the majority of competition shooters ride the reset.

All I know is that riding the reset helps my shooting a lot, and I tend to shoot a gun better if it has a shorter and more positive reset. And I've noticed that trend in other shooters too.
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Old July 30, 2013, 10:22 AM   #5
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That's the way I practice too. When I'm at the range. Then when I train the muscle memory kicks in and I ride the reset too.

Another great way to learn that is snap caps.

I sit there with my Glock 19 while watching a movie or TV show and reset the tirgger and dry fire. Hold it back, reset the trigger, let go till reset and squeeze again.
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Old July 30, 2013, 05:43 PM   #6
45_auto
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Quote:
that the majority of competition shooters ride the reset.
Hasn't been my experience, but YMMV.

Makes you wonder why people put trigger over-travel stops on their guns. If they can stop their finger going away from them in a precise position while shooting as fast as they can, why can't they do the same thing while pulling the trigger?

Nothing wrong with riding the reset and prepping the trigger if you're shooting slow enough at a target far enough away to need more precise sight alignment. You'll still be ready to squeeze the trigger before your sights are aligned.

You'll find that a single technique isn't always the best answer. At close range with a large enough target to be shooting splits in the teens, most people's finger is just moving too fast to precisely control it's stopping point.

Of course, most people don't train or compete anyway, so they can't tell you what their performance level is, just that they are "really fast and a really good shot"!

Last edited by 45_auto; July 30, 2013 at 05:53 PM.
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Old July 30, 2013, 05:57 PM   #7
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Riding the reset is a gimmicky one way range technique that will not hold up under real stress firing.
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Old July 30, 2013, 08:38 PM   #8
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Trigger reset practice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gats Italian View Post
Riding the reset is a gimmicky one way range technique that will not hold up under real stress firing.
For the most part that is true. Very true.
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Old July 31, 2013, 02:33 AM   #9
savagest
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I figured as much but it helped me at the range.
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Old July 31, 2013, 02:35 AM   #10
Jammer Six
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Trigger reset is also extremely valuable as a teaching technique.
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Old July 31, 2013, 05:49 PM   #11
savagest
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I went out today to test my reloads and fire a few factory rounds, and did the reset thing again and showed great results in my follow up shots. I am sold.
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Old August 2, 2013, 04:38 PM   #12
Al Thompson
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Paul Gomez has a great video on trigger manipulation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ajGrqR244g
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Old August 2, 2013, 04:59 PM   #13
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Use a friend

At the range, get a friend to slug you in the shoulder after each shot. That simulates you moving for cover, hitting obstacles, dodging lead, etc.

If you can keep the trigger reset without accidental discharge through all that then you should be good to go on practicing that way.
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Old August 3, 2013, 10:44 AM   #14
Constantine
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Trigger reset practice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fileophile View Post
At the range, get a friend to slug you in the shoulder after each shot. That simulates you moving for cover, hitting obstacles, dodging lead, etc.

If you can keep the trigger reset without accidental discharge through all that then you should be good to go on practicing that way.
That stimulates getting punched in the shoulder while shooting.

A training class would stimulate better.
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Old August 4, 2013, 11:43 AM   #15
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Funny how live fire finds the flaws in dry-fire training with some firearms.

My S&W Semi-Auto has the Apex kit and makes for a smooth pull, crisp/clean break and short reset.

However what works for me doesn't work for someone else and a friend of mine had a double fire trying to adjust to the trigger reset and let up too little while not having a good grip and Bang Bang !

Never have to worry about that on any of my others, they are not as light and designed differently.
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Old August 4, 2013, 07:50 PM   #16
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Quote:
Riding the reset is a gimmicky one way range technique that will not hold up under real stress firing.
You are very right... but you cant tell that to sportsman.
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