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Old August 6, 2013, 06:35 PM   #51
barnbwt
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"Look for a company that:
--makes a fantastic product
--has some manner of a shaky business or operational plan
and
--falls on it's face or otherwise shoots itself in the foot
...and that's your recipe for finding the next Python."

The last piece of the recipe for "next Python" is that it doesn't already have an undeserved reputation. I would have submitted the MaTeBa company for Exhibit A, but they have since claimed an even greater mantle of "Python-eity" than the Colt itself. Well made pistols, no doubt about it, but hardly deserving of the same respect as Korth's and such that were flat-out made nicer (i.e. the price is due to rarity, not reputation)

I instead submit the offspring of Ghisoni's (of MaTeBa) M2006 revolver, the Chiappa Rhino, as the next "Greatest Thing We Didn't Love Until it was Too Late." We have a great concept, solid design, poor business decisions (early on, QC was sacrificed to make deliveries, an infamous RID-gate scandal culminating in the distributor calling its customers "tin foil hatters," and little to no marketing of such a new and controversial gun was paid for). As far as I know, the company is currently selling the revolvers well, but who knows for how long. It seems doubtful there is enough interest to keep them in production for many years (it's also probably the most complicated/expensive thing Chiappa makes).

I predict that market exposure will gradually increase sales to the point where Chiappa thinks it's got a cash cow, at which point they will over expand their production, lose a bundle when they don't sell for what they promised the Board, and abandon the project for the next whiz-bang idea.

PS; I giggle a bit when I hear Pythons described as "Rolls Royces or Cadillacs." There is a gross difference in quality between those two. Like between a Rizzini and a Purdey SxS shotgun. One is a very nicely made execution, one is a museum grade manifestation of human skill and spirit that you crudely blast stuff with . I've seen Pythons, and heard many more accounts of them; they were very well made revolvers with pleasing aesthetics. They were not the pinnacle of gunsmithery, now and forever, like many wish to believe based on today's rarified prices. They were a very well made, and even more expensive/difficult to make, product, which was unable to justify its place in the market any longer (for a number of reasons, both gun-related and not). A Prince of Revolvers --not a God-Emperor of Revolvers

TCB
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Old August 6, 2013, 07:58 PM   #52
pete2
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There won't be another "Python". Quality like the Python has is gone. Even the custom built autos that are so great will never be Pythons. The Python was a production gun that rivals anything built then or now.
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Old August 6, 2013, 08:09 PM   #53
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There are no guns that meet all of the requirements put out by sevens (see post #4)...and he has the essentials just right.
To the poster who said "Coonan"....that might have worked out, if Coonan had not re-started production again recently. The new ones are better than the old ones. If they halt again...who knows? But the ones made in 82-84 never achieved cult status, because the demand was about exactly equal to the supply. I honestly don't see anything different with the new ones....today or 20 years from now.

Quote:
Hollywood always drives desire for items.

Yeah...
For idiots, and
For about 3 days...
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Old August 6, 2013, 10:24 PM   #54
Sevens
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I think Coonan certainly has a "chance" to fill the qualifications that I laid... and I only say such a thing simply because Coonan has failed in the past.

Please believe me when I say that I pray it won't happen, because I'm a tremendous fan of the pistol and the whole dang operation. I personally believe that these are good people that turn out a fantastic product that simply isn't just "another handgun" out there amongst so many. It's "familiar" but yet so different than most anything on the market, and it manages to pull all that off in an almost "normal" sized handgun that is not freakish looking or one that makes even a casual non-gun person do a double-take and drop a jaw. (like, for example, an X-frame S&W or a Desert Eagle or a Rhino)

Given the history of the operation and how it did indeed fail in the past, it would seem to be wishful thinking to claim that it couldn't happen again.

Someone posted around these forums quite some time ago that they used a careful plan when re-introducing this wonderful gun. I had asked why it's not splashed on every magazine cover and being splattered high & low and the answer made a heap of sense: you can kill an operation when you stir up far more demand than you can possibly deliver given the situation. Coonan took a more rational approach and built a number of these pistols and their only advertising in the early stages of this current go-round was word of mouth.

It wasn't until the last two years of setting up at the SHOT show that Coonan has been piling up the orders and building a tremendous backlog of demand. My dealer recently indicated that a number of pistols have shipped (which he had mostly presold!) and that others are coming in. That's fantastic news for a guy like me that wants to see them live long and prosper.

But to think that a small operation like Coonan (2013) couldn't fail in some way and end up ceasing production and closing doors -- that would be to ignore our history, and to specifically ignore Coonan's own history.
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Old August 6, 2013, 10:25 PM   #55
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...wanted to mention that my blood is flowing really nicely on this subject after pounding 150 rounds through mine between Thursday and Sunday, and running three completely different loads in that session, all with zero failures of any manner. And I was even able to gather most of my brass.
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Old August 6, 2013, 11:07 PM   #56
stormyone
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<<<It's simply an expression of ones opinion.>>>

I was expressing my opinion of your opinion. No offense meant, of course.

Last edited by stormyone; August 6, 2013 at 11:18 PM.
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Old August 6, 2013, 11:27 PM   #57
fuzzie-boy
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volquartsen question

now that most of the standard velocity match/target ammo has either disappeared or costs a fortune, can the volquartsen custom, since it is built off of the ruger frame even though it has its own upper, match the ruger's reputation for shooting just about anything well and without jamming? anyone have any input regarding this volq custom and a steady diet of blazer or federal hv ammo going through it for long periods of time and accuracy/malfunction experiences? thank you.
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Old August 7, 2013, 10:19 PM   #58
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I already see it happening with early Smith and Wesson N frame revolvers. Of particular interest are the post war, pre model guns like the .357 Magnum (pre-27), the .44 Magnum (pre-29) and nearly any .45 caliber Handejector.

Add to that pre and post war .38/44 Heavy Duties and Outdoorsmans, and for that matter nearly any pinned barrel Smith.
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Old August 8, 2013, 08:24 AM   #59
saleen322
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Quote:
now that most of the standard velocity match/target ammo has either disappeared or costs a fortune, can the volquartsen custom, since it is built off of the ruger frame even though it has its own upper, match the ruger's reputation for shooting just about anything well and without jamming? anyone have any input regarding this volq custom and a steady diet of blazer or federal hv ammo going through it for long periods of time and accuracy/malfunction experiences? thank you.
Based on what I buy, quality .22 LR standard velocity ammo is what is most available. The junk .22 HV is what seems like has increased in price the most and is being bought up by the pubic the most. If you purchase a quality pistol, why shoot crap ammo through it just to save very little money. If you can buy a brick of quality .22 SV for like $50, why shoot junk that is now going for like $35 or more.
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Old August 8, 2013, 10:31 AM   #60
SpareMag
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I think we can expand the selection process to include models from solvent gunmakers that did not catch on.

I think the Steyr GB would qualify,

http://www.google.com/search?q=steyr...PXtb5PD0mTM%3A

And the Walther P5


Last edited by SpareMag; August 8, 2013 at 10:36 AM.
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Old August 8, 2013, 10:44 AM   #61
Dragline45
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As far as iconic status goes and the pricetag to go along with it, I can see the desert eagle being the next python 20-30 years down the road.
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Old August 8, 2013, 11:09 AM   #62
SpareMag
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Quote:
As far as iconic status goes and the pricetag to go along with it, I can see the desert eagle being the next python 20-30 years down the road.
Yeah, that is a good one to toss into the discussion. I assume you mean the .50 version...
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Old August 8, 2013, 11:47 AM   #63
Bob Wright
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My vote goes to the USFA single actions. These guns were very well fitted, good shooters, and hansdome to look at. They were all steel, deeply blued and beautifully color case hardened. They sere only so-so in sales, due to rather high price, but now are discontinued.

All the American made single actions from the 'Sixties are becoming somewhat of collector's items, but these were not so finely fitted and finished as the USFA guns.

And, in my opinion, guns with plastics and alloys just won't carry the charisma that all steel/walnut guns carry.

Another consideration is its "old West" look, which along with a WW II connection or roarin' 'Twenties appearance, goes a long way towards collector's wants.

That's my two cents.

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Old August 11, 2013, 12:37 PM   #64
MattShlock
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Taurus

Pre semi-auto Taurus'. Best made guns for the money at the time as an S&W spinoff. Price will stay reasonable and the relative quality will be praised.

If you saw Wolverine I'd love to get my hands on that Viper.

I always found any Python action to be very sweetly tuned outta the box.
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Old August 11, 2013, 04:07 PM   #65
Dragline45
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Quote:
Pre semi-auto Taurus'. Best made guns for the money at the time as an S&W spinoff
The Python isn't the gun it is today because people thought they were a good deal for the money, to say any Taurus will be the next Python is laughable. The Python is revered for its beautiful finish and craftsmanship, not something that can be said about any Taurus.
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Old August 11, 2013, 05:59 PM   #66
MattShlock
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Rocket Science Abounds

Don't be so sure. I made my point clear as to why. And, by the way, you can still buy new Taurus revolvers...
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Old August 12, 2013, 08:01 PM   #67
larryh1108
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Boberg seems to have an interesting pistol with a following and waiting list. If time proves the design, look out.
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Old August 13, 2013, 12:43 AM   #68
FrankenMauser
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Quote:
I instead submit the offspring of Ghisoni's (of MaTeBa) M2006 revolver, the Chiappa Rhino, as the next "Greatest Thing We Didn't Love Until it was Too Late." We have a great concept, solid design, poor business decisions...
Have you handled a Rhino?
They may seem cool to a lot of people, based solely on looks; and even more cool, based on the ergonomics. But... they're dogs, mechanically. Fit and finish suck. The cocking/firing mechanism is overcomplicated and rougher than a gravel road. Trigger feel is terrible, and trigger weight heavy. And, they're coming from a company that no one (in the U.S.) respects, to begin with.

Rhinos will be in the same category as the Dardick 1100 and 1500, if they're killed off -- peculiarities that didn't catch on, due in part to poor execution and manufacturing shortcuts.
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Old August 13, 2013, 03:46 AM   #69
Sevens
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I managed to break one in the gun store while dry firing when the salesman suggested that I try dry-firing it.

I was pretty much embarrassed, but only kind-of, and I apologized and he thanked me... better to have it bomb out right there at the gun counter rather than get sold to a customer and bomb out on it's virgin range trip.

This was a brand new four-inch.

I've seen the cut-away photos of the design. I will stay away until Smith & Wesson or Ruger manage to get the rights to build a bottom-barrel revolver.
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Old August 13, 2013, 08:37 AM   #70
micromontenegro
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I think the new Pythons are already here, and they are called "Diamondbacks". Fast forward a couple of years, and the new Python will be called "Cobras" and "Detective Specials".
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Old August 13, 2013, 09:20 AM   #71
Bob Wright
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Watch Antiques Roadshow on PBS. The furniture that retains and/or appreciates in value is furniture that is made of solid wood, such as mahogany, walnut or maple with solid secondary wood such as maple, poplar or even white pine. There is no flake board, plywood or plastic.

Things that are built of quality material, well made. What guns meet these critera? Plastic, alloy, even painted finishes rule the day.

That is not to say these arms are inferior, on the contrary, they are very reliable, accurate and fine guns. Just lack the trademarks of quality.

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Old August 13, 2013, 02:17 PM   #72
Sevens
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Quote:
I think the new Pythons are already here, and they are called "Diamondbacks". Fast forward a couple of years, and the new Python will be called "Cobras" and "Detective Specials".
Folks, I think we have a thread winner.

I can tell you that King Cobra prices have launched in the last few years...
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