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Old August 17, 2013, 09:28 PM   #1
baddarryl
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Synthetic to Walnut Stock?

Hi all. I have a Marlin xl7 in .270 that I really like. I am thinking of putting a walnut stock to add some weight. The rifle as is is 6.5 pounds according to Marlin. How much would a walnut stock add? I know this sounds wimpy, but at this weight even the .270 has a little more recoil than I like. I just handled some walnut model 70's at the LGS and I liked the feel of more weight to the gun.

Also since stock fit is so important, how does one go about ordering a properly fitting stock or being measured for one?
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Old August 17, 2013, 09:40 PM   #2
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As far as determining your length of pull, the easiest way is to measure the distance between the inside of your elbow and the tip of your forefinger. That will give you an approximate measurement.

As far as changing stocks on a xl7, those rifles come with a pressure point in forend putting upward pressure on the barrel. When you put an aftermarket stock such as a Boyd's on it, it will be free floated. About half the time the rifle shoots as good or slightly better, about half the time they shoot worse. Hope you're feeling lucky.
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Old August 17, 2013, 09:57 PM   #3
baddarryl
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That free floating I am a little concerned about. I have heard different reports from people.
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Old August 18, 2013, 04:28 AM   #4
big al hunter
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Quote:
How much would a walnut stock add?
Boyds lists the xl7 walnut stock as weighing approximately 2.8 lbs. Take the stock off and weigh it. Subtract that from 2.8 lbs.
http://www.boydsgunstocks.com/produc...=7370&cat=1223 here is a link to Boyds so you can see all the options. There are several styles to choose from. Use the boxes on the left side of the screen to select the model and options.

If your rifle does not shoot well with a floated barrel you can add a pressure point with epoxy very easily.
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Old August 18, 2013, 06:34 AM   #5
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Use some epoxy and a steel rod in the fore end to add some weight up front.
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Old August 18, 2013, 08:17 AM   #6
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I've weighed a bunch of stocks. MOST walnut stocks are 30-36 oz. MOST factory plastic stocks are the same 30-36 oz. I've not specifically weighed one of the Marlins however and it is possibe their walnut stock is a little heavier. The point is that most factroy synthetics are not lighter than most factory wood stocks. In fact many are heavier. You don't get lighter synthetic stocks until you get into the $600 price range where you will see 16-20 oz stocks. I have 2 identical 870's. One walnut, the other factory synthetic and the walnut stock is 4 oz lighter.

If you want heavier, go laminated. Most of those tend to weigh more than either solid wood or synthetic. Adding weight to the hollow buttstock is also an option. It will however change the way the gun balances and handles. That could be an improvement.
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Old August 18, 2013, 02:16 PM   #7
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You could take the recoil pad off and fill the hollow buttstock with putty or bondo and mix some bb's or something in there to add even more weight. I've never personally done it but a lot of people do, and it seems to be effective. If more weight/less recoil is all you're after that's what I'd do.
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Old August 20, 2013, 10:16 AM   #8
Bart B.
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Use lead shot instead of BB's and there'll be more weight per cubic inch of the mix.

No rifle I know of shoots very accurate consistantly with any pressure on the barrel from the stock's fore end. How does one keep the pressure to the barrel from the fore end's movement the same in all shooting techniques and positions? Did anyone ever measure how much fore ends bend from normal handling and in different shooting styles?

Remington tried that with a pair of mechanical adustable contact screws in their 40X stocks decades ago. Never worked and folks backed those screws out so the barrels were totally free floating.

Free float the barrel. But you'll need to do a good job of epoxy bedding the receiver in the stock.
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Last edited by Bart B.; August 20, 2013 at 10:23 AM.
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Old August 20, 2013, 11:04 AM   #9
Savage99
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Sell the Marlin or put it aside as a back up.

Buy a rifle that you like such as that M70.

The Marlin is a entry level rifle anyway without the features a rifleman prefers for hunting.

It lacks control round feeding which will reduce the chances of feeding fumbles,
and does not have a three position safety that will control the firing pin.



I posted the picture above to see what that new to me Marlin's bolt face is like.

As I advised, get an unscale CRF hunting rifle and not a cheap entry level gun.
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Old August 20, 2013, 12:31 PM   #10
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If it is just the recoil which is the problem, you might consider adding a good recoil pad to your Marlin; a hunting buddy of mine has this rifle in 30-06, and the factory pad leaves a bit to be desired.

I have had excellent results adding a Limbsaver to my Tikka T3 lite in 30-06. (Which comes with a "rock" passed off as a recoil pad from the factory.) Night and Day.

There are four of us that have each purchased new 30-06s in the last year in our hunting group. And four different makes/models. After putting the Limbsaver on my Tikka, it feels softer shooting with 200 grain loads moving at 2,400fps than any of the other three shooting 110 grain loads moving at about the same velocity. I load light 110 for practice, as a couple in our group are younger and new to shooting 30-06.

Immediately after shooting my Tikka one of our group went out and got the Limbsaver for his Ruger M77; much happier next time out at the range!

And they do make quite a few that are fitted to the stock of many factory rifles. I believe that this is for your rifle (you may want to double check):

http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/product/7-S10101
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Old August 20, 2013, 09:17 PM   #11
baddarryl
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Sell the Marlin or put it aside as a back up.
That is exactly what I am thinking of doing. Seriously eyeing Model 70's.
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