The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The North Corral > Black Powder and Cowboy Action Shooting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old July 5, 2013, 08:04 PM   #1
bn12gg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 19, 2011
Location: Winter Park, Florida
Posts: 178
Flintlock Flash Guards

Are many of our flintlock shooters using flash guards on their pans? A guy at a bench next to me mentioned (no big deal) that he had encountered a little
spill out from my flintlock on a couple shots. He was wearing shorts. This surprised me as I am a safety nut. I note the TOW has nice brass flash guards for $ 6 and change.

Are they difficult to install?

Thanks for responses.
bn12gg is offline  
Old July 5, 2013, 08:54 PM   #2
kwhi43@kc.rr.com
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 21, 2008
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 1,195
I been shooting Flintlocks for 50 yrs . Been around thousands of other Flint
shooters. Never seen one.
kwhi43@kc.rr.com is offline  
Old July 5, 2013, 09:13 PM   #3
bedbugbilly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 19, 2009
Posts: 2,241
I never have but then I usually shoot just by myself. When your flinter discharges, you can get a hot shot out of your vent that does and can bother the guy next to you. It's been while since I've been to Friendship but if I remember correctly, they have some plywood "guards" up on the line that takes care of that problem.

I have personally experienced it when shooting next to an individual who was shooting a flint - he was on my left and of course the vent pointed in my direction. It was rather uncomfortable (not to mention hot) so I just moved over a little and that took care of it. I would imagine it might vary from one flinter to the newt depending upon vent size, etc.

I also am always "safety minded" so if I was going to be shooting a flint next to someone, I'd either move over and I'd certainly warn the individual next to me. I would just consider that a "common courtesy" I guess.

If I remember correctly, I think most "reenacters" who use flint are usually required to have a flash guard on their muskets as a safety feature.If I remember correctly, I think you just remove the frizzen screw, slide it on, and replace the screw. I have a Fusil de Chase and most of the guards I've seen have been for larger locks such as the one like I have, the Brown Bess, Charleville, etc. I don't know as if I've ever seen one for a smaller size lock such as a Siler, etc. but they may be out there.

I also have experienced several times catching a cap fragment from the shooter to my left. I'm assuming that you are shooting a right hand rifle/musket so I'd just be aware of it and if you can, put some distance between you and the guy to your right if you can.
__________________
If a pair of '51 Navies were good enough for Billy Hickok, then a single Navy on my right hip is good enough for me . . . besides . . . I'm probably only half as good as he was anyways. Hiram's Rangers Badge #63
bedbugbilly is offline  
Old July 5, 2013, 10:13 PM   #4
4V50 Gary
Staff
 
Join Date: November 2, 1998
Location: Colorado
Posts: 16,925
They're easy to install and should be on reenactor muskets (for safety of the fellow on their right).
__________________
Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt. Molon Labe!
4V50 Gary is offline  
Old July 6, 2013, 06:37 AM   #5
Captchee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 2, 2013
Posts: 322
The jet of gas from a flintlock can be substantial and reach a lot further then some would think . It usually best to let folks know your about to shoot if they are in the blast area .
As to flash pan guards . that’s another innovation that’s been around for a very long time .
Imagine standing in a line formation , shoulder to shoulder when the command to fire is given .. What the flash guard does is help deflect the gases up instead of strait out .
This is why you normally see these guards on muskets not rifles as riflemen were not normally subject to being confined to line formations for more then 1 or 2 volley’s .
Today some folks use them when they shoot at ranges that do not have dividers between shooters OR when the range frowns on you messing up their dividers. Especially if they have the nice plexi glass ones . Flintlocks do a real number on those

As to how to put one on your rifle . that’s really going to depend on your lock .
If your using an old lock design that’s does not have a bridled frizzen . Then the frizzen spring is removed , the frizzen screw is taken out and slid through the guard then back through the frizzen .. Depending on the length of your screw , you may need to replace it with a longer one
The guard is set back down along the pan and then the screw is tightened down . Then the spring replaced .
With un bridled locks , you will then have the fiddle factor as you cant tighten it down to much without restricting the movement of the frizzen itself as such a lot of times you will have to move the guard back into place before closing the frizzen

Now if you a bridled frizzen , which most better locks that are made today are . Then you will most likely need a new frizzen screw that is longer .
Again the frizzen spring is removed . Then the frizzen screw is removed from the inside of the lock and replaced with the longer screw .
That screw will now pass through the bridle and stick out about 3/16 to a ¼ .
The frizzen spring is then replaced .
the guard is slid on and a Keeper nut is then placed on the exposed threads so as to hold the guard in place .
The guard is them moved down along the pan and the nut tightened down snug but not overly tight . If you go to tight , you will bend the bridle and stall your frizzen .

places like Track of the wolf , Muzzleloader builder supply , and even Dixie , sell the pan guards or the little kits that come with the new frizzen screw .

they are not hard to install in most cases . but do often require constant adjustment with a mind not to over tighten the keeper nut

Last edited by Captchee; July 6, 2013 at 06:42 AM.
Captchee is offline  
Old July 6, 2013, 08:12 AM   #6
Rifleman1776
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 25, 2010
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,309
I have one on my Brown Bess. None on my other flintlocks. In your case the issue is one of range courtesy and safety. Never step up to shoot if someone is directly to your right. Unfortunately if someone steps up just as you are about to shoot your concentration can be broken while you remind him you are shooting a flint. Some ranges require a shield be stapled to a post for protection. It is a flintlock 'thing' and you must be aware at all times. It is your responsibility.
The flash guards work OK but can be a pain for priming and cleaning.
Rifleman1776 is offline  
Old July 6, 2013, 08:36 AM   #7
MattShlock
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 8, 2013
Posts: 239
Need 'em for reenactor muskets. Easy to put on it seems at first. Usually the (frizzen?) screw on the lock you use to attach most is long enough to do two jobs. But they often need two points of contact not to move -- some require a second little screw and a hole drilled and tapped in your lock, some come with a pre-cut tab you bend under the pan while part is above, and those without can be snipped with a wire cutter and the same bending done.

Brigade of the American Revolution has required flashguards forever it seems and with two points of contact for many years now.

Many of my flintlocks have them from mid 17th C. thru Rev. War. But not most. It would definitely be a courteous luxury for the range shooter to your right...
MattShlock is offline  
Old July 6, 2013, 09:27 AM   #8
bn12gg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 19, 2011
Location: Winter Park, Florida
Posts: 178
Folks-- Thanks for the replies. My flintlock is a custom Lancaster .45 with a Chambers Silar lock. It is really dialed in nicely now so rather than taking the lock apart a light wood partition to the right of me on the bench seems like the way to go.

Again, thanks. David
bn12gg is offline  
Old July 6, 2013, 01:45 PM   #9
kwhi43@kc.rr.com
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 21, 2008
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 1,195
This is What is used at most ranges.



You can see what happens to the boards at the range at Friendship.


Last edited by kwhi43@kc.rr.com; July 6, 2013 at 03:25 PM.
kwhi43@kc.rr.com is offline  
Old July 6, 2013, 04:19 PM   #10
Old Stony
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 31, 2013
Location: East Texas
Posts: 648
I have to agree that it is just good manners to protect the shooter to your right. The flintlocks will not only spray some hot powder that direction, but tiny bits of flint often go with it. It can be darned uncomfortable to another shooter.
Old Stony is offline  
Old July 17, 2013, 08:15 PM   #11
bn12gg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 19, 2011
Location: Winter Park, Florida
Posts: 178
Flash Guard Installed.

Well in the final analysis I went with a flash guard on the Lancaster. It's a brass guard, looks sort of cute-- hope it does the trick. It is installed and we are looking forward to Sat/Sunday shooting with it.

Thanks for the suggestions.

.02

David
bn12gg is offline  
Old July 20, 2013, 01:59 PM   #12
bn12gg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 19, 2011
Location: Winter Park, Florida
Posts: 178
Trip To The Range

Just finished cleaning up the Lancaster and Browning Hawken post trip to the range this a.m. With flash guard installed I put 10 rounds (.45) thru the rifle. I used Goex 3f but also broke into a pound of Kixx 3f that I wanted to try having never shot Kixx. Well, the flash guard works great-- no issues with the rifle
spitting hot powder or bits of flint on the guys to my right. It seems like it exhausts primarily upward after impacting the inside of the flash guard. I'm pleased to be a safer flintlock shooter at my club.

The only downside to the flash guard is at clean up. My Chambers Siler lock is noticeably dirtier since the powder escapes against the guard and seems to dirty up the inside of the guard as well as the face of the lock. The guard seems to be operating and doing what it was designed to do. Good.

.02

David

Last edited by bn12gg; July 20, 2013 at 02:05 PM.
bn12gg is offline  
Old July 21, 2013, 07:29 PM   #13
MattShlock
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 8, 2013
Posts: 239
I have seen (and own somewhere) kits to replace Siler and Chambers and others' lock screws including a flash guard. Yours just go one using a spring vice, removing a screw, adding the guard, putting the screw back, and releasing the vice?
MattShlock is offline  
Old July 22, 2013, 08:28 AM   #14
bn12gg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 19, 2011
Location: Winter Park, Florida
Posts: 178
Mattshlock-- No, the lock screw was replaced and machined by my gunsmith. I had a feeling the install was going to be a little tricky so I did not attempt it myself. TOW sells both the flash guard and the appropriate screw for a Chambers Siler lock.

David
bn12gg is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:37 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09393 seconds with 7 queries