The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Handguns: The Revolver Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 23, 2013, 08:04 AM   #1
revolvers_good
Member
 
Join Date: May 11, 2013
Posts: 23
Is it OK to dry fire no-transfer bar SA revolver

Hi SA revolver users,

Is it OK to dry fire the SA revolvers that do not have a transfer bar? Or should snap caps be used?
revolvers_good is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 08:14 AM   #2
JimPage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 21, 2010
Location: Rome, NY
Posts: 650
Generally, it's ok to dry fire centerfire SA guns. Snap caps won't hurt, so I would suggest to be safe that you use the snap caps.

I'm not a gunsmith and I don't play one on TV.
__________________
Jim Page

Cogito, ergo armatum sum
JimPage is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 08:16 AM   #3
revolvers_good
Member
 
Join Date: May 11, 2013
Posts: 23
Thanks Jim
revolvers_good is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 09:33 AM   #4
newfrontier45
Junior member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2012
Posts: 921
I'd also suggest using snap caps.
newfrontier45 is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 10:03 AM   #5
Aguila Blanca
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 25, 2008
Location: CONUS
Posts: 6,685
It's safe, but IMHO it's not a good idea to make a practice of it. The firing pin is typically held in the hammer by a very small locking pin. Too much dry firing can shear that pin. Snap caps are never a bad idea.
Aguila Blanca is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 10:23 AM   #6
revolvers_good
Member
 
Join Date: May 11, 2013
Posts: 23
Thanks for the replies. I'll take your advice and use snap caps.
revolvers_good is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 12:42 PM   #7
DPris
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 19, 2004
Posts: 4,781
Dry-firing a Colt-style SA repeatedly frequently results in an oversized hole in the recoil plate where the firing pin passes through.
On a Colt, or a good copy that also uses the plate, that plate can be replaced. Not a home repair job, though.

On a cheaper copy without the plate, once you enlarge that hole through the frame too much, the frame's junk & you don't repair it.

Best to always use snap caps in conventional Colt-patterned single-actions if dry-firing.
Denis
DPris is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 09:01 PM   #8
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,967
I often note that many commercial snap caps are nearly worthless in reducing the hammer or firing pin impact. And that does include such home made devices as using pencil erasers in primer pockets of fired cases.

I see nothing wrong with using GOOD snap caps even in guns that won't be usually be damaged by dry firing, like the SAA. But in too many cases, snap caps are merely a "feel good" gadget rather than real protection from gun damage.

Just a note FWIW. Dry firing a revolver with a transfer bar is not a good idea. Unlike the hammer block (as used in the old Colt DA's and modern S&W's) the transfer bar is struck every time the hammer falls, so extensive dry firing can damage it. The hammer blocks, on the other hand, are never hit by the hammer unless something is already very seriously wrong with the revolver.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 10:13 PM   #9
newfrontier45
Junior member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2012
Posts: 921
Quote:
Dry firing a revolver with a transfer bar is not a good idea.
High volume CAS shooters replace Ruger transfer bars quite often.
newfrontier45 is offline  
Old June 23, 2013, 10:21 PM   #10
'88Scrat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 11, 2011
Location: Kansas
Posts: 233
Seems like I remember something about dry firing being more of a problem for rim-fire firearms. That said I make a point not to do it when it can be helped.
__________________
BOOM
'88Scrat is offline  
Old June 24, 2013, 07:30 PM   #11
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,967
In the old days, it was common for a firing pin in a rimfire firearm to strike the edge of the chamber if there was no cartridge or snap cap. That soon battered the edge of the chamber and the result was that cartridges would no longer chamber. With a few exceptions, modern .22's (for practical purposes the only rimfires still being used) are made with a positive firing pin stop that will prevent that from happening.

Still snap caps in .22's are not a bad idea, and if you dryfire a .22 without them, check the gun every so often to make sure the firing pin is not hitting the breech face.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old June 26, 2013, 09:25 AM   #12
Ibmikey
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 1, 2013
Location: Medical Lake Wa.
Posts: 668
I have found Azoom snap caps to be the best as they are machined aluminum thus holding up over a longer period of time. All snap caps will wear out if struck by the FP too often! I do not know of anyone making a snap cap for .22 rimfire, they are normally sold as action testing or cycling only, there is no spring loaded or soft surface for the FP to strike.
Ibmikey is offline  
Old June 26, 2013, 09:32 AM   #13
Glenn Dee
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 9, 2009
Location: South Florida
Posts: 1,487
If the gun has a rigid firing pin, try not to dry fire it. If it's a rimfire try not to dry fire it

Thats my story, and I'm sticking to it.
Glenn Dee is offline  
Old June 26, 2013, 01:43 PM   #14
James K
Staff
 
Join Date: March 17, 1999
Posts: 19,967
.22 snap caps are just pieces of plastic; they have no springs. The plastic itself cushions the firing pin and protects the chamber edge. If they are rotated when loaded they will usually last a good while.

Jim
__________________
Jim K
James K is offline  
Old June 27, 2013, 12:46 PM   #15
Slopemeno
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 19, 2007
Posts: 2,377
I have at least 100,000 cycles of dry firing, and probably 30,000 of live fire on my Ruger Security Six. No issues at all to report. Don't own a snap cap, either.

Ruger used to have an Old Model (so no transfer bar) Single Six in a plastic display case they'd take to large gun shows. The box had a mechanism that cocked and dry fired the Single Six every second for the three days the show was open. And they took that display with them to shows for years.

The point of that display was to show that Ruger's rimfires were perfectly safe to dry fire, and that you'd probably wear out before the gun did.

While I'd probably treat a small-framed first generation Blackhawk carefully- I wouldn't baby it.
Slopemeno is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.09462 seconds with 9 queries