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Old June 17, 2013, 11:17 AM   #1
Franklin1995
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Stevens model 335 stock

Good morning guys,
I have a old 1920's stevens side by side shotgun. About a year ago I took it to the range to shoot it for the first time in 40 years, and the range officer decided he wanted to look at it. Long story short, he dropped it and part of the stock broke on it. I want to repair it but I don't really have enough money to take it to a smith. I've been looking online and it seems that repairs on wood stocks are easy to do yourself. Does anyone have any tips on what glue to use? What methods? Should I even try myself or should I take it to a smith? Approximately how much would it take for a smith to fix it? Hopefully the pictures below are working. Thanks in advance



[IMG]http://tinypic.com/usermedia.php?uo=1LhMuIYoALxyqr%2Ff1rhU%2BIh4l5k2TG[IMG]

[IMG]http://tinypic.com/usermedia.php?uo=1LhMuIYoALxOQNGUv72qBYh4l5k2TGxc[IMG]
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Old June 17, 2013, 12:44 PM   #2
Dixie Gunsmithing
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A broken toe. I've seen this too many times to count, though this one broke all the way up to the screw.

The fix is to dig a little wood out of the center of each, and leave it rough. Mix some epoxy, and place it on both parts, then clamp them together. After it dries, you have to refinish it to make it look close to original, but that's the way its done. At least you still have both pieces.
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Old June 17, 2013, 12:58 PM   #3
Franklin1995
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Do I need to put any rods through it like you would to fix the neck? And how much should I carve out?
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Old June 17, 2013, 01:46 PM   #4
PetahW
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.

Why would you be the one that has to pay for the repair ? .






.
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Old June 17, 2013, 01:52 PM   #5
Franklin1995
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The guy blamed me. I had it in the bag (which was very old too) laying on the counter. I personally knew that the bag was weak and to hold it by the gun itself. The range officer didn't like where the bag was at though so he grabbed it and flipped it over (keep in mind this isn't even on the range, it's in the store.) Some of the seam gave out and the shotgun slid out of the bag, off the counter, and onto the floor. He blamed me because I had it in that bag even though he never should have been handling my firearm without my permission.
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Old June 17, 2013, 03:09 PM   #6
Scorch
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There is an old saying: you broke it you bought it. He owes you for the repair.
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Old June 17, 2013, 03:38 PM   #7
Franklin1995
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I know I know, but it's too late. I think i'm going to glue it back up tonight and order a replica buttplate. Thanks for the help guys.
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Old June 17, 2013, 05:17 PM   #8
Dixie Gunsmithing
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Quote:
Do I need to put any rods through it like you would to fix the neck? And how much should I carve out?
You have enough to add a dowel if you wanted to, but you really don't need to. I wouldn't remove much wood, it's really to roughen the base, giving the epoxy a place to grip, and make sure the two pieces line up flat before you add any glue. Use a longer setting epoxy, say the 10 or 15 minute stuff, so you have time to apply a good coat, set it, and clamp it. If it had been a small piece, the 5 minute would have worked, but here, get some that will take a little longer to cure. Wipe off any squeeze out after you clamp it, and before it hardens.
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Old June 17, 2013, 05:41 PM   #9
Franklin1995
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It already lines up very well. The grooves for the screw even lines up correctly. I got some epoxy that cures in 24 hours. Should I clean the wood at all or just put it on and clamp it?
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Old June 17, 2013, 08:33 PM   #10
Dixie Gunsmithing
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If the wood didn't get dirty, or anything get on it, and its still fresh, you really don't need to clean it, and it could actually work against you. The best thing, though, is to take a small chisel, and rough the surface a little by making a few small gouges in each piece. That will give the epoxy something to bight more into instead of just the wood fiber. Since the piece is as big as it is, theres a big glue surface area, and that is a lot of holding power when it is all coated.

Last, if any glue gets in the screw hole, you may have to drill it out with a bit thats smaller than the outside of the threads, so the screw can re-thread itself. Try to find a bit about the same diameter as the root of the threads.
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