The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > Hogan's Alley > Tactics and Training

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 6, 2013, 11:31 PM   #1
Magkor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Lafayette, Georgia
Posts: 11
Teaching my brother

Hey guys. I've recently have noticed my brother, who is now 9 years of age, has become mature enough to handle a firearm. So far me and my boyfriend have taught him to do basic maintenance on a Star Fire star .45, .38 special Charter Arms(not sure what model I can ask), and a .410/.45 long colt judge. We've been teaching him basic safety in the process, not to point the firearm at someone things like that. We haven't let him fire anything as all those would probably scare him off. What's some good things to teach him, besides continuing cleaning, should we also teach him while we are searching for a .22? I've thought about doing stance practice and dry fire but I'm not quite sure. My boyfriend is used to teaching men in the military, not such a young person and I want to make sure we won't miss anything and other tips to teach a young kid that will be easier for him to grasp.
Magkor is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 12:02 AM   #2
SgtLumpy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2013
Posts: 779
With nearly all brand new shooters, any age, I put only ONE round in the gun. After that first BOOM they're either excited, scared, confused, all three. It's easy for them to lose muzzle discipline when they're so heightened.


Sgt Lumpy
SgtLumpy is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 12:20 AM   #3
Magkor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Lafayette, Georgia
Posts: 11
Yes I understand. I'll never forget when I first shot a firearm it was a 30-06 hunting rifle. needless to say my ex boyfriends dad had to take it from me. They didn't inform me of anything about the proper way to hold the rifle. I hit my target alright, but had a nasty bruise and I haven't shot a rifle, except a 1936 7.5x54 French Mas since and I was frightened to shoot it. We want to start him on a bolt action 22lr cricket. He watches us shoot the pistols I've mentioned in the first post, so he understands as far as that goes. He's extremely eager. My main worry that I didn't mention is the fact that he is almost to eager, most people I have seen first start out shooting is worried. I'm not quite sure its a good thing.
Magkor is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 06:20 AM   #4
Husqvarna
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 7, 2012
Location: Sweden
Posts: 628
most boys are eager

I was so eager I didn't listen to my father and recieved my one nad only smack from him first time he took me to the range.

what about a BB-gun?
Husqvarna is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 08:10 AM   #5
SgtLumpy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2013
Posts: 779
I think eager is good. I'd much rather see an eager first time shooter next to me at the range than a frightened first time shooter.

He'll be fine. It's not rocket surgery. Put the first targets very close. Tell him to "hit the circle". See what happens. Interrupt if he's doing something unsafe. At least that's how I approach new shooters. I don't get caught up in Weaver, Chapman, Isocolese, blah blah. Just get them safe and see what their intuitive shooting brain comes up with.


Sgt Lumpy
SgtLumpy is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 12:26 PM   #6
jimmythegeek
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 10, 2011
Location: Seattle
Posts: 216
He'll probably want a thin grip for small hands

I noticed my 9 year old boy was holding my CZ-Kadet sort of crabwise because the grip is wide enough for a double stack magazine. To reach the trigger he had to move the backstrap past the first knuckle of the thumb.

He handles a Ruger 22/45 much better.

And he *loves* shooting .357 ammo out of a Ruger GP100. Like the poster above said, start out with 1 round, but don't be shocked if he's ready for a lot of recoil. Boys are...different.
__________________
"Jeez, man, what's another word for 'stupid?'"
"Tactical." -Tom Servo
Marlin 795, 795ss, 39A Mountie, CZ-455 American, CZ-452 Scout, CZ-75 Kadet, AOM160 M1 Carbine, USGI M1 Carbine, M1 Garand, Dan Wesson PM7 1911
jimmythegeek is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 04:28 PM   #7
Magkor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Lafayette, Georgia
Posts: 11
I personally went through a safety class while in my local Sheriffs department Citizens Academy about two months ago. It didn't teach me anything I didn't already know of course but it was on paper type learning of three basic rules. I made him memorize those and started teaching him, aidan, those through air soft guns, if he shot someone it wouldn't hurt an he did shoot me but that was partially my fault because my 2 year old brother slipped outside and ran in front of my 9 year old brother and well. I took the bb. Aidan has been shooting Air soft, both just for target and 'war games'
Magkor is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 09:01 PM   #8
4V50 Gary
Staff
 
Join Date: November 2, 1998
Location: Colorado
Posts: 17,057
Even if they've been exposed to guns, I always go over safety first and then handling. Here's why:

1) Establish a common standard of safety
2) Establish communication. As an instructor, you must be able to communicate with your student(s). You do this by giving instructions, asking questions and determining the effectiveness of your teaching techniques. You then adjust your teaching techniques to meet the needs of the students.
3) With handling, they're taught how to operate the firearm, shooting stances, and other drills. This way they are familiar with them before they get to the range and won't be fumbling on the range. Additionally, they become more confident and comfortable around it. Also aiming (put a snap cap in the gun and a coin on the slide or topstrap).

On the range, it's a basic review (Q & A). Then one bullet. Load and shoot. Let them get use to the recoil.
__________________
Vigilantibus et non dormientibus jura subveniunt. Molon Labe!
4V50 Gary is offline  
Old June 8, 2013, 12:45 PM   #9
Magkor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Lafayette, Georgia
Posts: 11
Okay Gary. I am tempted to continue using air soft pistols to teach him things like stance while me and my boyfriend look for a .22LR for him to start with. But all of this is good advice and I truly do appreciate it. I was never properly trained when I first started being around firearms. This will all help with my little brother making him comfortable with them and I'll have something we share common interests in that we can do together. thank you.
Magkor is offline  
Old June 8, 2013, 12:49 PM   #10
SgtLumpy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2013
Posts: 779
Give the kid a real gun, under safe conditions. There's no need to start out with airsoft or similar unless he's just entirely too immature to handle any kind of projectile throwing instrument. If that's the case, then airsoft is probably too mature for him as well.

I don't think "penny on the topstrap" and similar drills have any place at the very beginning of any shooter. That's advanced trigger control.

Just let the kid shoot. The magic of seeing the hole show up where you thought it would be then won't be lost.


Sgt Lumpy
SgtLumpy is offline  
Old June 8, 2013, 04:58 PM   #11
Magkor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Lafayette, Georgia
Posts: 11
I never been much of a fan with the penny trick. I tried around with it but earned a better way through the sheriff's department classes that helped me loads better than the penny trick ever would have. But SgtLumpy thank you and I will use all this advice you've given as soon as I can.
Magkor is offline  
Old June 8, 2013, 08:40 PM   #12
jrothWA
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 11, 2006
Posts: 1,979
Best option is to..

contact a local 4-H organization and see if they have a peer group fireams training program. 4H still endorses and firearms training.

There will be a good relationship with his peers.

Good Luck.
jrothWA is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 04:46 PM   #13
Magkor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Lafayette, Georgia
Posts: 11
I tried that already. Our local one only does BB guns and he is no longer interested in them as he has being shooting them since he was five, so about 4 years.
Magkor is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 05:01 PM   #14
buffalo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2009
Location: SW Florida
Posts: 103
Give him a real gun to shoot,he should be fine. My first time shooting a "real"gun was a 12g 870 with deer slugs when I was about 10,gave me a black eye the first shot but after that I learned how to hold it properly. Boys don't care about recoil from what I have seen,girls it will scare to death but boys just don't seem to be affected the same.
buffalo is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 12:53 PM   #15
Magkor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Lafayette, Georgia
Posts: 11
Yeah at 18 is when I shot my first gun. After my boyfriend, at the time, shot it and seeing how the recoil was I was a bit terrified I forgot to turn the safety off. I hit the bullseye dead on with a 30-06 but bruised my shoulder an impaired my heading because the ear bud fell out as I pulled the trigger. dispute the bruise and not been able to hear I wasn't terrified anymore. I doubt my brother ever will be. He is already begging to start out with my boyfriends Star Fire star .45 or Charter Arms .38.
Magkor is offline  
Old June 12, 2013, 12:41 PM   #16
I'vebeenduped
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 2, 2013
Location: AZ
Posts: 202
He might be a little too old for this at 9 years old. I am not sure. Every kid has a different maturity level. I bought this series for my son. http://store.crickett.com/my-first-rifle-story-book/
He is going to be old enough to hit the range with me on the 4th of July, his birthday. I read these to him at bedtime (I doubt THAT will apply with your brother). He can almost quote it, word for word, as I read it to him. After the recent tragedy, when the little boy shot his father in the abdomen, we discussed it as we do every publicized weapon tragedy (be it firearms, bow, knife, etc.). I asked him what he thought went wrong and my boy told me that he broke the number one rule of gun safety; Never point a weapon at anyone! Repetition, especially for the younger kids, is imperative. Even though these books might be a bit juvenile for him, they are FULL of invaluable information.

You said, "I've thought about doing stance practice and dry fire but I'm not quite sure." I would say that this is very important. You want to make sure early-on that he knows not to sweep the firing line, keep his itchy finger OFF of the trigger until ready to fire, etc.

Do well!
__________________
The natural state of man, the way G‑d created us, is to be happy.
Look at children and you will see
I'vebeenduped is offline  
Old June 13, 2013, 01:41 AM   #17
MarkDozier
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 1, 2010
Posts: 339
Quote:
We've been teaching him basic safety in the process, not to point the firearm at someone things like that.
Things like that. That statement is puzzling me. Have you taught him the 4 COMMANDMENTS of Firearm Safety?

Rule Number one is ALL Firearms are ALWAYS loaded....
MarkDozier is offline  
Old June 13, 2013, 07:31 AM   #18
dayman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 18, 2011
Location: The Woods
Posts: 1,140
The 4 "commandments" according to the NRA. One organization in one country.
I'm not knocking them, or saying they're not an effective way of safe gun handling, but it's not as if they were sent from heaven on a golden scroll.

They certainly work, but people take them a little too seriously sometimes - like when they worry about sweeping people with a holstered gun. I'd been shooting safely for years before I heard of the NRA.
__________________
si vis pacem para bellum
dayman is offline  
Old June 13, 2013, 09:07 AM   #19
Magkor
Junior Member
 
Join Date: June 6, 2013
Location: Lafayette, Georgia
Posts: 11
Yes. I've been teaching him the four rules. Anytime he's cleaning or just disassembling and reassembling a firearm if he does break the 'rules', be it pointing it at someone or not remembering to check if its loaded(it never was but you have to practice checking) we would take it away for 5 minutes and after that we would add time. it has helped him on learning this though. Granted the rules are good guidelines but its not completely needed to be memorize or anything. everything is pretty close to common sense for adults.
Magkor is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.11190 seconds with 7 queries