The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 7, 2013, 01:38 PM   #26
Silver00LT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2013
Location: Alabama
Posts: 286
My calibers are 9MM, .223 & .308. As I am not actively reloading .223 yet I only need to worry about 9MM and .308. Not looking to start reloading another caliber(not need to).
__________________
My YouTube MOLON LABE
Training pays off...so keep active with your firearm. It could save your life one day.
Silver00LT is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 01:53 PM   #27
BigJimP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Posts: 11,340
Ok, the 650 will easily handle all three of those calibers...( and so will the 550 ) ....not the SDB.

I probably shoot 9mm 75% of the time ....in my semi-autos / and .45acp about 15% of the time ...and .40S&W and .22 the other 10% .....

In revolvers...I'm shooting .357 mag 99% of the time...
----------------
So I keep a pretty heavy inventory( 20 - 60 boxes) on 9mm, .357 mag....maybe 10- 25 boxes of .45 acp and .40S&W ....

I tend to load to case volumes of bullets in one caliber / box them up and keep them in inventory ( 4,000 bullets in 115gr 9mm / 2,000 bullets in 230gr .45acp )....and then I clean and lube the press ..and change calibers.
------------
I was down to about 8 boxes in inventory on 9mm yesterday ....so I put the 9mm head in the press this am and loaded up a few boxes...and I'll load up another 60-80 boxes this weekend ( 3,000 - 4,000 rds ) and box em up and put them in inventory. But I'm comfortable with that load in 9mm ( 115 gr Montana Gold bullet, FMJ - Hodgdon Universal 4.7 grains ...gives me a great practice / range round at about 1100 fps I think... ) ....and it runs 100% in a variety of my 1911's in 9mm as well as my Sig's 226 and 239....so once I settle on a load, I don't vary it much ....so its easy to run a volume and stack it up for use whenever..../and buying in case lots on bullets and primers and powder in 8lb kegs...that round, even at today's component prices is still under $ 8 for a box of 50 rds.

So 20 - 30 min of effort this am ...gave me 5 boxes of 9mm ...for $35 - $40 ....and I'll have some fun at my local indoor range for a couple of hours this afternoon ...../ if I was buying that ammo retail it would be at least $ 100 ...and my reloads, with a premium bullet, on a press where I can hold my tolerances really tight ....will reduce my group size at least 25% over any cheap retail ammo...and I'm not a competition shooter ...I shoot for recreation .../ but there is no downside when you have good equipment, only spend 20- 30 min to accomplish something ...and then get to go to the range...and shoot 2 or 3 times more, with the same ammo budget.

But justifying the purchase price on a 650 - with a case feeder...and a powder check die ....and quick change kits in separate toolheads...and most of the other options offered by Dillon --- strong mount, etc...is pretty easy to justify.

Last edited by BigJimP; June 7, 2013 at 02:00 PM.
BigJimP is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 02:38 PM   #28
BigJimP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Posts: 11,340
Not that it matters....but here is my 650 setup on my bench....

http://thefiringline.com/forums/atta...3&d=1262629099

Shop July 08 017.jpg

Dillon 650 ....with case feeder, etc is on one bench. A pair of MEC 9000-HN hydraulic shotshell presses ( the red loaders ) sit beside it on separate benches --- in my basement shop.

I load sitting on a stool ...so loaders are basically at cabinet top height.
BigJimP is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 03:13 PM   #29
Sure shot wv
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 25, 2013
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 111
I have to suggest dillon here as well. I recommend the 650. That will be my next press. Right now I'm running a 550 with case feeder and strong mount. As well as quick change assemblies. I have about 1k in that setup for 9,40,45. When I'm in the rhythm I usually load about 600 rounds an hour. That's with 5 primer tubes already filled and all my prep work done. The biggest reason I'm staying with dillon is there consistency dropping powder. With my autocomp loads ill get it set and I'm done. I check my powder charge every 1k rounds. And in over 15k rounds loaded on that setup I've never been off. There customer service is the best IMHO. I've had to call 3 times for random stuff and they've been great.

Now the reason I wanna move to a 650 is for my pistol loading so I can add a bullet feeder. I trust the powder drop and my eyes enough where I don't need a powder check. Dillon doesn't make a bullet feeder but the hornady one is very easy to install and adapt it to a 650. I load the most for 9mm because I shoot it the most. Training, practice and IDPA.

I was like you op when I was ready to upgrade. I wasn't sure what I would be comfortable at. But I was lucky and got to try rcbs, hornady, and dillon presses all decked out. After using them all I liked dillon the best. The hornady with the bullet feeder was nice but not as consistent as dillon. So I went with the 550 for the manual index and probably 3 months later thought I'm an idiot I should have got the 650. I love the 550 but trust me you will get used to everything and will feel comfortable and you'll be glad you went with the 650. Like others said you can start slow and upgrade later like the case feeder. But once you use one you'll never go back

Oh and as far as your desk, mount it to the wall and buy the strong mount. That mount does wonders for stability.
Sure shot wv is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 03:41 PM   #30
Brian Pfleuger
Staff
 
Join Date: June 25, 2008
Location: Central, Southern NY, USA
Posts: 18,781
The Lee Classic turret is an excellent press, much faster than a single stage and MUCH cheaper than any of the major (mentioned) progressives. It is auto-indexing and allows for 200 rounds per hour to be loaded, 150/hr is cake. The press is under 100 dollars.

I love my Classic turret. However, if I shot more than a couple of hundred rounds a month, I'd go full progressive. My research indicates that I'd go Hornady but it's largely a Ford versus Chevy argument. I don't mind at all sitting down for an hour and loading 2 months of cartridges. If I shot 500 rounds a month, I would not want to spend 2 1/2 hours loading them every month, hence I'd go progressive.
__________________
Still happily answering to the call-sign Peetza.
---
The problem, as you so eloquently put it, is choice.
-The Architect
-----
He is no fool who gives what he can not keep to gain what he can not lose.
-Jim Eliott, paraphrasing Philip Henry.
Brian Pfleuger is offline  
Old June 7, 2013, 04:18 PM   #31
wogpotter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 27, 2004
Posts: 3,057
May have been answered already in which case I apologize as I missed it.
Hornady L&L will take standard dies, but with an adaptor to the L&L bayonet.
__________________
Allan Quatermain: “Automatic rifles. Who in God's name has automatic rifles”?

Elderly Hunter: “That's dashed unsporting. Probably Belgium.”
wogpotter is offline  
Old June 9, 2013, 01:22 PM   #32
FrankenMauser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 25, 2008
Location: 1B ID
Posts: 6,793
Quote:
My research indicates that I'd go Hornady but it's largely a Ford versus Chevy argument.
Yea, there's a lot of unfounded brand loyalty in the progressive world - often coming primarily from people that have never used anything but "their" brand. ...which I find quite comical (and is one reason I avoid the "which XXXX press is best" discussions).

As I've said in the past-
The only reason I ended up with a 550B, is because Hornady L-N-L APs were backordered at the time, and I was offered the Dillon and a bunch of accessories for a price I couldn't refuse. It also didn't hurt that I had loaded more ammunition on that particular 550B than anyone else ever did, including the owner.


For the average reloader on a budget, that wants auto-indexing and a decent production rate, but will require quite a few caliber conversion kits... Hornady is the way to go.
But, if you think you may need the "bullet-proof, no B.S." warranty, step up to the Dillon 650 and resign yourself to the fact that caliber conversions are more expensive.
__________________
"Such is the strange way that man works -- first he virtually destroys a species and then does everything in his power to restore it."
FrankenMauser is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 08:13 AM   #33
Silver00LT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2013
Location: Alabama
Posts: 286
So far its the Dillion 650 and Hornady LNL. Due to the expense of having multiple caliber changes...probably going with the Hornady.

My single stage I turn out 100/hr(throw charging and not weigh charging). Too slow and after one session it feels more like a job and not a hobby so I lose interest for a day or two before I start again. This is why I break the sessions down to maybe 200 a week spread out over 4-6 days depending on my mood. You have to think I pull the handle at least 400 times for 100 rounds.
__________________
My YouTube MOLON LABE
Training pays off...so keep active with your firearm. It could save your life one day.
Silver00LT is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 08:37 AM   #34
BigJimP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Posts: 11,340
Dillon 650 and Hornaday LNL are both good presses ....but its not just price that differentiates them on the caliber conversions.

They each handle the steps in the process a little differently - especially in terms of powder measures and primer feed handling.../ while I favor the Dillon system - and think in general the Dillon 650 is a little more heavily built press -both presses will do what you need.

They both have some quirks.....but I'd suggest you try and find someone locally that has each ...and test drive them a little if you can before you decide. I was lucky, I had buddies with each ...and other systems like the RCBS progressive ....and it was helpful in making up my mind.
BigJimP is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 08:53 AM   #35
Silver00LT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2013
Location: Alabama
Posts: 286
Apparently the only ones in my area that reload are my father in law and me. hard trying to find people around me that reload. I know they are out there...probably off the net kind of people.

I've been watching videos on both. So far the LNL is cheaper and cheaper for caliber changes, but there are their own differences.
__________________
My YouTube MOLON LABE
Training pays off...so keep active with your firearm. It could save your life one day.
Silver00LT is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 12:23 PM   #36
TNT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 4, 2006
Location: Back in glorious Nebraska
Posts: 606
I have to say Dillon as well depending on how much you shoot will dictate what press you want 550 is manual indexing but it is a far cry from being a small upgrade once you get moving you will be cranking them out. It is manual indexing but after a bit everything is muscle memory. If you are looking at the 650 then you just as well get the 1050 pricey yes but it is a wonder to be seen and as you go up caliber conversions for both do as well all part of the game the only regret I have in not having two 550s one for pistol the other for rifle. as for the warranty it follows the product not the owner. If you buy a used one that does not work you just call Dillon and say yours don't work and they will replace it. you cant beat that.
__________________
"In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man and brave, hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, however, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot."
TNT is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 03:44 PM   #37
Silver00LT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2013
Location: Alabama
Posts: 286
Quote:
I have to say Dillon as well depending on how much you shoot will dictate what press you want 550 is manual indexing but it is a far cry from being a small upgrade once you get moving you will be cranking them out. It is manual indexing but after a bit everything is muscle memory. If you are looking at the 650 then you just as well get the 1050 pricey yes but it is a wonder to be seen and as you go up caliber conversions for both do as well all part of the game the only regret I have in not having two 550s one for pistol the other for rifle. as for the warranty it follows the product not the owner. If you buy a used one that does not work you just call Dillon and say yours don't work and they will replace it. you cant beat that.
I'm sure if they see that it has been rigged up they will void the warranty right?

That'd be awesome to have a press for my 9MM and for my .223. My .308 rounds is for my hunting round so I do not put out a lot of rounds per year so That will stay on my current setup.

I've seen fully automatic 1050s...I was DROOLING! Then again I am not retired or rich so no go.
__________________
My YouTube MOLON LABE
Training pays off...so keep active with your firearm. It could save your life one day.
Silver00LT is offline  
Old June 10, 2013, 10:42 PM   #38
Lost Sheep
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2009
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Posts: 2,996
Dillon warranty

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver00LT
I'm sure if they see that it has been rigged up they will void the warranty right?
I have never heard anyone report that DIllong nas ever refused warranty service on one of their presses. Tumblers, maybe. But presses or supporting assemblies, no, not one.

Of course, if someone sent in one that had welding marks, machining cuts and other such signs of true modifications, I am not sure, but I have never heard of any example of that, either.

What makes you ask?

I HAVE heard that the lifetime warranty does not apply to the 1050, as it is regarded as a commercial press and Dillon's lifetime, no questions warranty is intended for private owners' personal use presses. But that is secondhand information. You might want to check with Dillon for the straight information.

I don't own a Dillon, being satisfied with my 200 rounds per hour Lee Turret Press (and easy caliber swap) at an affordable price. But the main reason I stay away from progressives is that it is more relaxing to monitor one operation at a time rather than multiple operations. But that is just my preference.

Dillon is, by all reports (and I do mean ALL) a superb press, If funds are limited, other brands are acceptable and nearly as good (some say as good or better, but that is matter of style, I think, more than objective measure). Of course, some like the Lee Pro-1000 or Loadmaster, and they have certain advantages (being affordable). So, you pays your money and you takes your choices.

Good Luck

Lost Sheep
Lost Sheep is offline  
Old June 11, 2013, 01:31 PM   #39
Silver00LT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2013
Location: Alabama
Posts: 286
Quote:
I have never heard anyone report that DIllong nas ever refused warranty service on one of their presses. Tumblers, maybe. But presses or supporting assemblies, no, not one.

Of course, if someone sent in one that had welding marks, machining cuts and other such signs of true modifications, I am not sure, but I have never heard of any example of that, either.

What makes you ask?

I HAVE heard that the lifetime warranty does not apply to the 1050, as it is regarded as a commercial press and Dillon's lifetime, no questions warranty is intended for private owners' personal use presses. But that is secondhand information. You might want to check with Dillon for the straight information.

I don't own a Dillon, being satisfied with my 200 rounds per hour Lee Turret Press (and easy caliber swap) at an affordable price. But the main reason I stay away from progressives is that it is more relaxing to monitor one operation at a time rather than multiple operations. But that is just my preference.

Dillon is, by all reports (and I do mean ALL) a superb press, If funds are limited, other brands are acceptable and nearly as good (some say as good or better, but that is matter of style, I think, more than objective measure). Of course, some like the Lee Pro-1000 or Loadmaster, and they have certain advantages (being affordable). So, you pays your money and you takes your choices.

Good Luck

Lost Sheep
By no means am I going to purchase a 1050 lol...its unpractical I could use the money saved for a weapon or more components. But I see why it would not be viewed as a lifetime warranty as that would be the model most likely purchased by reloading stores for profit.

If you don't mind posting your setup on here?
__________________
My YouTube MOLON LABE
Training pays off...so keep active with your firearm. It could save your life one day.
Silver00LT is offline  
Old June 11, 2013, 06:13 PM   #40
BigJimP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 23, 2005
Posts: 11,340
The 1050 ....does not have the "no BS warranty".....Dillon considers it a commercial machine. The 1050 is more machine than even any competitive shooter would need, in my opinion.

Dillon will warrant any of their machines ....but not for things that have been "Bubba-Fied"...or abused.../ there are some things on their machines that have limited warranties...like the battery operated alarms on the low primer, low powder and powder check systems.../ but you can buy rebuild kits for them if you screw up and forget to change a battery and it leaks ruining the switch or if a switch wears out....

650 ...does 2 very important things that the 550 does not do ....Auto Index and it has a 5th station for the Powder Check die. Its about $127 difference in the 2 machines.../ so the 650 is the way to go in my view.
BigJimP is offline  
Old June 11, 2013, 06:57 PM   #41
csmsss
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 24, 2008
Location: Orange, TX
Posts: 2,986
Quote:
Now the reason I wanna move to a 650 is for my pistol loading so I can add a bullet feeder. I trust the powder drop and my eyes enough where I don't need a powder check. Dillon doesn't make a bullet feeder but the hornady one is very easy to install and adapt it to a 650.
You might be able to save yourself a good bit of change:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0SQTye4AU8
csmsss is offline  
Old June 11, 2013, 07:17 PM   #42
CrustyFN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 4, 2006
Location: West Virginia
Posts: 2,258
Quote:
If having a distraction when you're working on a progressive machine worries you ....it ought to scare the daylights out of you on a manually indexing machine...
I never understood that really but then maybe I do things totally different than everybody else. I have had distractions on my Lee classic turret and that's an easy one to get straightened out. When I have a distraction on my Dillon 550 I unload the shell plate and start over. Nothing to go wrong or worry about there. If I was loading on a 650 I would do the same thing.
__________________
I don't ever remember being absent minded.
CrustyFN is offline  
Old June 11, 2013, 07:56 PM   #43
orionengnr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: July 9, 2004
Posts: 4,985
A used 450 or 550 (in normal times) can be a great way to get into a Dillon at an affordable price.

My first press was a 450, lent to me when the owner shipped out for Germany. When he returned 2 1/2 years later, I returned it to him, and my wife bought me a new 550.

Since then I have bought another 450 and another 550, both used, for around $200 each. Each was missing some pieces, but each ended up fully functional for well below the price of a new one. I turned each over to friends of mine who wanted to start handloading. Both are cranking out thousands of rounds now.

I have seen SDBs for similar prices, but the proprietary dies were a limitation I was unwilling to accept...mostly because I load for multiple calibers. If you only load for one (handgun) round, an SDB at the right price could be attractive.
orionengnr is offline  
Old June 25, 2013, 04:59 PM   #44
Silver00LT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2013
Location: Alabama
Posts: 286
What's the difference between these two other than price? They both look auto indexing.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/880...ith-auto-index

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/814...e-turret-press

Lost has a good answered typed up, but this is info that should be available to public and not just PM.
__________________
My YouTube MOLON LABE
Training pays off...so keep active with your firearm. It could save your life one day.
Silver00LT is offline  
Old June 25, 2013, 09:45 PM   #45
grisbald
Member
 
Join Date: October 23, 2011
Posts: 63
I've been reloading now for about 3 yrs. First year and a half was all done on a single stage press. Worked fine for rifles, but then I started to purchase some handguns and I couldn't stand to load those on the single. I purchased a Lee Turret press for my handguns and that really worked out well. Was seriously thinking of purchasing a Hornady Lock-n-Load progressive, even had it in a cart to order, but decided that I just didn't reload enough to lay out that amount of money. So I spent about $60 and bought 5 more turrets for the turret press for different calibers and I couldn't be happier.
grisbald is offline  
Old June 25, 2013, 11:07 PM   #46
Lost Sheep
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2009
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Posts: 2,996
Deluxe and Classic Turrets compared (from my point of view, of course)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver00LT
What's the difference between these two other than price? They both look auto indexing.

(The two links in Post #45)

Lost has a good answered typed up, but this is info that should be available to public and not just PM.
Thanks for the vote of confidence, Silver00LT. This is nothing not widely known but gathers together all my observations.

The Lee Classic Turret and the Lee Deluxe Turret operate in exactly the same manner. (Except for some older, now discontinued models of the Deluxe which have 3 die stations - and, no, the 4-hole turrets do not interchange with the 3-hole turrets.)

Same speed, many of the same parts and same operating mode and technique.

But there are differences.

Evolution: The Classic Turret is the newer design of the two.

Durability: The Classic Turret's base is cast iron, the Deluxe is cast aluminum. Iron wears better than the softer metal, aluminum.

Ease of use: The Deluxe has a 1" smaller vertical opening than the Classic Turret. Though either is capable of taking rifle cartridges, the Classic Turret will take longer ones and if you have big hands is the clear winner

Spent Primer Handling: The Deluxe drops primers out of a slot in the ram to fall into a cavity inside the press base. But only about 90% succeed in their intended journey. The Classic drops primers down the center of the hollow ram and into a clear plastic tube which can contain a few hundred primers or be directed into a receptacle of your choice. The difference in the behavior of the debris (products of combustion) from the spent primers is even more striking. With the Deluxe, you wind up with primer detritus all over and have to dismount the press and sweep up the pile of spent primers every several hundred rounds.

More on Durability: The Deluxe ram is smaller in diameter than the Classic's ram. This gives a much different bearing surface for the ram to be guided as it moves up and down. The Classic press will last much longer because of the increased surface area and because iron is tougher than aluminum.

Even more on Durability: The Deluxe's linkage is aluminum and stampings. The Classic's linkage is more robust.

In the examples posted, the Deluxe has the optional roller handle, which is said to be easier to use, so an upgrade over the standard, stock handle. The same handle is available for the Classic Turret.

In summary:

The Deluxe is aluminum, spills spent primers and has a slightly smaller opening (which you may find important when loading long cartridges or long bullets. Kempf's gun shop (online) assembles a kit containing the Classic Turret and does not force someone who already reloads to take other stuff you already have (except a set of dies and some cartridge boxes).

I think that's about it.

Lost Sheep

Last edited by Lost Sheep; June 25, 2013 at 11:13 PM.
Lost Sheep is offline  
Old June 25, 2013, 11:15 PM   #47
Silver00LT
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 6, 2013
Location: Alabama
Posts: 286
That's a good comparison Lost.
Silver00LT is offline  
Old June 26, 2013, 05:04 PM   #48
stubbicatt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 15, 2007
Posts: 1,075
Neat thing about any press you buy used, if it is serviceable, if it doesn't meet your needs, most likely you won't take a bath on resale.

If you decide you want a progressive, perhaps my experience will help. I started with a Lyman TMag turret press, which just didn't meet my needs, so I sold it and bought a Pacific (precursor to Hornady) progressive press. It was OK to use, but it was really old school, and the press and accessories have since been updated quite a bit. Nonetheless, I had a lot of issues with that press, and never could really count on it to work as it should. It was sold down the river for a first generation Lee Loadmaster. Once the bugs were worked out on the Loadmaster, rarely would it create a cartridge which didn't have a primer, but sometimes it did. The emptying of spent primers was a pain from the hollow ram.

Time passed and I went through several single stage presses including the Co-Ax, in pursuit of "precision" rounds. I bought a RCBS single stage press which served me well for many years, as all I was loading was XTC ammo for an AR15, and didn't shoot pistol or any other cartridges at that time. For precision cartridges, I don't think the RCBS can be beat until you start dinking around with soda pop bottle cappers or those sorts of presses and hand dies.

Time passed, and I decided I would do well to get another press for my general shooting needs, so I bought the first generation Lee Classic Cast turret press, and I still have that press. It makes really good pistol cartridges and small rifle cartridges such as 223.

However, I decided to get into action shooting where my ammo requirements increased several-fold. So I got a Dillon 1050. There is no doubt in my mind, that if you want a progressive, you may find other brands falling short, but the Dillon will work. Every time. I can't say enough good about the Dillon Super 1050 and Dillon dies and accessories. For some reason, they are just the best quality tool of their type I have ever used. You will pay more for the Dillon products, but you aren't just buying a name, or a "cool guy" bragging rights, they really are excellent quality.

I didn't drink blue Koolaid, nor red, nor orange. I sold the 1050 due to a need for funds, and lack of use. If ever I was to buy another progressive, I would not get any other brand than Dillon. As it is now, my Classic Cast turret works just fine for my needs, other than precision loading, for which I use a RCBS single stage press.

I hope this helps you make a decision. I do not know *which* of the Dillon presses best serve your needs, so I cannot help there. But if you do decide on a progressive, get a Dillon. Any other brand of progressive which I have used has been a hit or miss proposition. The Dillon powder measures if polished up properly will throw accurate charges of even some stick powders, and they just work well. Period.

If an auto indexing turret will meet your needs, you can load about 200 to 250 autopistol cartridges per hour on the Lee turret press, provided you don't need to trim the brass, and just the nature of the Classic Cast turret press is such that you don't get upside down primers, or sideways smashed primers etc, and combined with the auto disc powder measure, I have always had serviceable ammo loaded on that press.

Hope this helps you some,


Good luck!
Regards,
Stubb

Last edited by stubbicatt; June 26, 2013 at 05:28 PM.
stubbicatt is offline  
Old June 27, 2013, 04:53 PM   #49
osirus82
Senior Member
 
Join Date: June 22, 2013
Posts: 102
I love to shot and go hunting and want to get in to precision long distance shooting. I watched everything i could and read loads of material on all the different types of presses, after all that i decided that the press for me that would fit my needs and has expandability was the dillon 650xl, the package was delivered after a couple days, they didn't have the carbide dies in stock, so i will wait a bit. happy reloading.
osirus82 is offline  
Old June 28, 2013, 12:34 AM   #50
osageid
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 21, 2010
Posts: 285
Press Upgrade

Quote:
Originally Posted by osirus82 View Post
I love to shot and go hunting and want to get in to precision long distance shooting. I watched everything i could and read loads of material on all the different types of presses, after all that i decided that the press for me that would fit my needs and has expandability was the dillon 650xl, the package was delivered after a couple days, they didn't have the carbide dies in stock, so i will wait a bit. happy reloading.
Congrats! Nice piece of equipment !
osageid is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.14803 seconds with 8 queries