The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Skunkworks > Handloading, Reloading, and Bullet Casting

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 1, 2013, 02:42 PM   #1
mmb713
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 15, 2011
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 293
Starline brass - trim or no?

I just got a couple new batches of Starline brass in 357 Magnum and 45 Colt. Do you think it's a good idea to trim them first or just load them as is. They all are below max and within .005" of each other. I've trimmed previous batches years ago but it is tedious. Was I just wasting my time?
mmb713 is offline  
Old June 1, 2013, 02:57 PM   #2
Misssissippi Dave
Senior Member
 
Join Date: December 5, 2009
Posts: 1,407
Having them all the same length makes the crimp more consistant. The last 1k of .357 mag I purchased I just loaded and they worked fine.
Misssissippi Dave is offline  
Old June 1, 2013, 03:04 PM   #3
David Bachelder
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 23, 2011
Location: Trinity, Texas
Posts: 632
I doub't if there is any need to trim. I never trim my pistol brass and it works fine. You do need to resize though.
__________________
David Bachelder
Trinity, Texas
I load, 9mm Luger, 38 and 40 S&W, 38 Special, 357Magnum, 45ACP, 45 Colt, 223, 300 AAC, 243 and 30-06
David Bachelder is offline  
Old June 1, 2013, 03:25 PM   #4
TXGunNut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 16, 2010
Location: If you have to ask...
Posts: 2,851
If they're under max and within .005" you'll likely never need to trim them. Check a few after 2-3 loads but revolver brass seldom grows.
__________________
Life Member NRA, TSRA
Smokeless powder is a passing fad! -Steve Garbe
I hate rude behavior in a man. I won't tolerate it. -Woodrow F. Call Lonesome Dove
My favorite recipes start out with a handful of used wheelweights.
TXGunNut is offline  
Old June 1, 2013, 04:43 PM   #5
chiefr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2010
Location: AR
Posts: 1,264
Over 40 yrs reloading handgun cartridges from 32 ACP to 500 S&W and I have never trimmed any handgun brass.
chiefr is offline  
Old June 1, 2013, 05:10 PM   #6
velillen
Member
 
Join Date: October 20, 2012
Posts: 88
Ive never trimmed my new starline pistol brass. Ive found it gets lost or damaged before it grows to long anyways.


But i hope its not a thread hijack but what do you guys feel about rifle brass? I just got some Starline 45-70 brass and it measures 2.100". Case trim length is listed as 1.995" with a max of 2.150". Do you guys always trim your new brass when its rifle or just shooting it as is till it needs to be trimmed?
velillen is offline  
Old June 1, 2013, 06:56 PM   #7
chiefr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 27, 2010
Location: AR
Posts: 1,264
velillen
Ive never trimmed my new starline pistol brass. Ive found it gets lost or damaged before it grows to long anyways.


But i hope its not a thread hijack but what do you guys feel about rifle brass? I just got some Starline 45-70 brass and it measures 2.100". Case trim length is listed as 1.995" with a max of 2.150". Do you guys always trim your new brass when its rifle or just shooting it as is till it needs to be trimmed?
Today 04:43 PM


I always trim bottleneck rifle brass to the "Trim to" length. Even when new as the lengths vary.

With straight wall rifle cases, the story is different. I have rarely seen straight wall rifle brass stretch. I check straight wall rifle brass for stretch only after max loads. I can't think of any instance where I have seen straight wall rifle cases stretch. At least in calibers I reload: 444, 45-70, & 50-70.
chiefr is offline  
Old June 2, 2013, 07:17 AM   #8
Mike / Tx
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 8, 2000
Posts: 1,318
I'm a bit more OCD about lenght than anything else I guess. I also use Starline brass almost exclusively and have for close to 20yrs.

Usually when I pull out a new batch from the box, I will randomly measure 15 or so of them, pick the shortest one, and will at least square if not trim the whole batch to lenght. I then write that length on the bulk box for future reference so I can set up the next time.

Usually it only amounts to squaring the mouths a touch, but I feel it is important to have them as close to the same as possible for my own benefit if for no other reason. I found out years ago that just like loading for my rifles attention to the minor details pays off in the end. If I were simply loading blasting ammo to go to the range and tear up paper with, I doubt I would ever even bother. However I hunt with my revolvers from .357 up through my 454, and I feel I owe it to the game to do all I can to ensure my shot goes where it should, and not in some general region. I have found with careful attention it is relatively easy to tune up loads for my revolvers and get them to group repeatedly when every round is as close to the same as I can get them.

That said a 3-4" offhand group at 25yds don't fly well with me unless I am burning off rounds from my 1911. I shoot single action and expect groups of 1-2" at this range, and if I am doing my part not a whole lot more out to 50yd.
__________________
LAter,
Mike / TX
Mike / Tx is offline  
Old June 2, 2013, 08:11 AM   #9
lee n. field
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 12, 2002
Location: The same state as Mordor.
Posts: 3,359
Quote:
I just got a couple new batches of Starline brass in 357 Magnum and 45 Colt. Do you think it's a good idea to trim them first or just load them as is. They all are below max and within .005" of each other. I've trimmed previous batches years ago but it is tedious. Was I just wasting my time?
Wasting your time.
__________________
"As was the man of dust, so also are those who are of the dust, and as is the man of heaven, so also are those who are of heaven. Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven. "
lee n. field is offline  
Old June 2, 2013, 10:00 AM   #10
boondocker385
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 6, 2013
Posts: 372
I am relatively new to reloading but I shoot a lot of 357. They do grow and trimming to a universal length does matter. More consistent crimps means better accuracy.
boondocker385 is offline  
Old June 2, 2013, 01:25 PM   #11
Roughedge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2011
Location: Monroe,NC
Posts: 351
I've been loading 35 years and I never seen pistol grow, mine allways get shorter.
__________________
The man that die's with the most stuff win's!
Roughedge is offline  
Old June 2, 2013, 03:28 PM   #12
boondocker385
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 6, 2013
Posts: 372
Interesting responses....with a variety of terms tossed about....in my mind pistol is short for automatic pistol not revolvers.
boondocker385 is offline  
Old June 2, 2013, 05:02 PM   #13
Roughedge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: January 24, 2011
Location: Monroe,NC
Posts: 351
Here's what the dictionay says " Pistol-a short-barrelled handgun " We shoot 200 to 300 357's every weekend and I've never trimed one. They split after about ten loadings.
__________________
The man that die's with the most stuff win's!
Roughedge is offline  
Old June 2, 2013, 05:18 PM   #14
arch308
Senior Member
 
Join Date: November 6, 2011
Location: DFW, Texas
Posts: 876
If they are + or - .005 you are good to go in my book. Any more spread than that I have found causes inconsistant crimps. I will trim if needed. Heck, it's a hobby I enjoy so I like to take my time and do it right. It doesn't happen much anymore but there's nothing more embarassing than to have your gun jamming on your reloads at the range. And with the revolver rounds a consistent crimp helps with making consistent ammo.
If I was in a hurry I'd invest in a fancy press instead of my old single stage.
arch308 is offline  
Old June 2, 2013, 05:44 PM   #15
boondocker385
Senior Member
 
Join Date: March 6, 2013
Posts: 372
The guy with the most stuff is dead and doesn't possess anything.
boondocker385 is offline  
Old June 3, 2013, 07:34 AM   #16
reloader28
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 13, 2009
Location: nw wyoming
Posts: 942
+1 for Mike/Tx
Trim them to get more for consistancy and accuracy.
Heck, I even anneal them (the brass, not those stupid nickel plated ones)when they start splitting and get more and more reloads from them.
reloader28 is offline  
Old June 3, 2013, 06:48 PM   #17
JaxJim
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 19, 2013
Posts: 4
I always trim new brass. It makes the crimp more uniform across that batch.
JaxJim is offline  
Old June 5, 2013, 06:19 AM   #18
stevelyn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 19, 2004
Location: Fairbanksan in exile to Aleutian Hell
Posts: 2,618
I run all of my new brass through the resizer and trim them to their trim-to-length. That way I know they are all uniform and the case mouths are square.

It also simplifies things with bullet seating and crimping especially when roll crimping revolver rounds.

Then again I've always been a little OCD about my quality control.
__________________
Herman Cain '12

Squished bugs on a windshield is proof the slow/heavy bullet theory works.
stevelyn is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2014 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.10398 seconds with 7 queries