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Old June 7, 2013, 07:52 PM   #26
Bart B.
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Gunplummer, why should we both quit reloading ammo (by me only shooting and you by only repairing and no shooting or reloading; guns) just becasuse I asked you a question you don't know the answer to? Sorry if I asked you about something you don't understand.
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Last edited by Bart B.; June 7, 2013 at 08:10 PM.
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Old June 8, 2013, 09:31 AM   #27
BumbleBug
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Thanks everyone...

Thank you for all the good info.

...bug
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Old June 8, 2013, 01:14 PM   #28
Gunplummer
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I'm finished. Obviously someone is dyslexic.
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Old June 8, 2013, 06:09 PM   #29
mwells72774
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just used a utg pull through reamer for my custom 308 mauser. worked simple and easy. backed out to clean probably 15 times. better to be safe than sorry.
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Old June 9, 2013, 11:16 AM   #30
Dixie Gunsmithing
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There was a book written on this, by a guy up in Alaska, if I recall, and is how I picked up a bunch of tips, a few years back. I can not remember the name of the book right off, and I'll have to look for it, but does anyone know the title? I'm pretty sure the author said his shop was in Alaska.

Anyhow, the book takes you through, step by step, the method I learned to use, including setup, mounting the barrel via a 4 jaw chuck with a spider on the back, at the muzzle end, a rotating oil supply collet at the muzzle, the floating chuck for the reamer, and how to use each. The oil supply flushes the chips back toward the cutter, and out the end, but you have to have an oil/coolant pump with enough pressure and flow to do it, and some lathes already have a good one built in.

Update: The title of the book is:

"Advanced Rebarreling Of The Sporting Rifle".
By: Willis H. Fowler Jr.

http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Rebar...Sporting+Rifle

Last edited by Dixie Gunsmithing; June 9, 2013 at 11:53 AM.
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Old June 9, 2013, 11:23 AM   #31
Dixie Gunsmithing
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4V50 Gary,

I would never use a drill, like the guy you speak of, as they always drill oversize, and the bit has no way to truly follow the bore. I'm sure you learned it the way I did, by using a roughing reamer, with a close tolerance pilot, and the same on the finish reamer. I either use Clymer, or Pacific on the reamers, or sets.

How did the barrel turn out, after using a drill? I've heard of others doing this, but I can see a whole mess of problems arising from it.
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Old June 9, 2013, 11:57 AM   #32
Dixie Gunsmithing
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Another Book

Below is another good book on this subject, that I forgot about, when I posted above, but its well worth a look.

"The Complete Illustrated Guide to Precision Rifle Barrel Fitting"
By: John Hinnant

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Illus...ref=pd_sim_b_2
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Old June 9, 2013, 12:30 PM   #33
HiBC
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On roughing with a drill:consider the drilled hole will probably not be perfectly co-axial with the bore,and the mouth or entry of the drilled hole will not have a perfect edge condition.

The reamer pilot is unsupported as the the reamer begins to cut.

The outside flutes catch the edges of the drilled hole and start.Some deflection will likely occur.The reamer body will create and follow its own axis.

As progress is made,eventually the reamer pilot will get to the bore.Suppose there is .0002 clearance for the pilot to ride the lands,but the drll helped the reamer find an axis .0015 off the bore axis.Suddenly the bore is forcing the reamer sideways .0014.

The pilot,especially if it is solid,will damage the lands.

Now,the flutes on one side of the reamer are suddenly forced sideways .0014,digging in a.0014 thick chip.Will the edge cave off the flute?Maybe.Now the chamber is an oversize oval with rattle room to chatter.

Let me guess,now its time to wrap abrasive cloth on a split stick and "polish" the chamber.
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Old June 9, 2013, 01:14 PM   #34
Bart B.
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My 'smith dialed in barrels held in a 4-jaw chuck with a gauge pin of exact bore diameter to get the breech end of the rifled blank turning on center. Then he started in the piloted reamer that well aligned it with the hole in the barrel. Just like gun drilling a solid blank; the cutting tool tends to center about the rotation axis and makes holes very straight.

Muzzles were faced off a similar way after dialing in the muzzle end with a similar gauging pin. A small amount of outside barrel diameter was turned off so it would put the bore centered in a chuck that held the muzzle turning on bore center while the 11 degree recessed muzzle face was made then a fine abrasive charged lapping ball was used to put the angled crown on the rifling out to a few thousandths past groove diameter.

Some 'smiths have checked barrel chambers for roundness that when used, shot sub 1/4" 100 yard groups all day long with good bullets. Even those chambers were, just like sized case bodys, were not perfectly round.

I think it's the barrel's metalurgy makup that causes all these dimensional irregularities. As the tool's cutting edge removes metal, the resistance it has to being machined causes the tool to move a bit. Another example is rifling twists taking a jump in twist rate in button rifled barrels; the button didn't maintain the same point and it twisted too much or too little to keep the rifling angle exactly the same from breech to muzzle. There's folks that'll measure your barrel for rifling twist irregularaties.
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Last edited by Bart B.; June 9, 2013 at 01:25 PM.
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Old June 9, 2013, 02:51 PM   #35
HiBC
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I use pin gages and a 4-jaw at the chuck,and also do the same at the other end of the barrel with a spider.
I crown the same way,generally 11 deg,then I put a center drill in the tool holder and use it like a boring bar to just cut a small corner break ,maybe .002 at the grooves.
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