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Old May 25, 2013, 08:41 PM   #1
Striker1
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Charge range for Pietta '58 Rem .44?

Hi all,

I've had a Pietta '58 Rem for many years but haven't fired it in quite a while. With the current ammo shortage, I think I'm going to take it out again for some range time Unfortunately, I have lost the owner's manual so can anyone here provide the factory recommended powder charge range?

Thanks

Last edited by Striker1; May 25, 2013 at 09:15 PM.
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Old May 25, 2013, 09:06 PM   #2
David13
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I don't know the range.
Do you have the brass frame? Stay low if you do. 25 is low.
I have a steel frame, and I get a real good bang and real good accuracy and distance with just under 25 grains.
I think a lot of people like to go higher than that, but some of them have found it doesn't add anything.
dc
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Old May 25, 2013, 09:14 PM   #3
Striker1
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It's a steel frame.

Thanks
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Old May 25, 2013, 09:20 PM   #4
freedom475
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25grains of any black powder 2ff, 3fff, 4ffff, or 25 gr volume of pyrodex or any of the other subs...safe, fun, and accurate!

sure you can go more...but accuracy can suffer and you really don't gain much except bigger boom
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Old May 26, 2013, 09:06 AM   #5
Striker1
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Well I found a on-line copy of their manual and was surprised that they recommend 12-15 gr for their .44's.??? Seems pretty low from what I remember...of course I could be wrong.
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Old May 26, 2013, 09:35 AM   #6
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They use the same manual for everything. I think they keep it low so they don't have to print a special one for the brass frames.
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Old May 26, 2013, 10:04 AM   #7
freedom475
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it's funny too...because the rammers on several of there guns are not long enough to force the ball down onto such light powder charges so the "No-Air Space" rule goes out the window by the factory's recomendation

Oh well so much for that internet wisdom
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Old May 26, 2013, 10:26 AM   #8
Roshi
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Suggest 25 to 30 grains

I use 30 grain Pyrodex pellets in mine and the accuracy is good at 15 yards.
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Old May 27, 2013, 07:11 AM   #9
Doc Hoy
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Lawyers....

I think that it is quite possible that the reason for the light load suggestion in the documentation is that the lawyers are recommending light loads as a way of reducing the risk to the organization, should a revolver fail.

By recommending a reduced load, the legal department places the company in the position of having done their due diligence should they be required to explain themselves to a judge or jury.

To the person who is unfamiliar with BP (the lawyers) the potential for an air space with a light load might not be self evident. But for that uninitiated lawyer, it might be completely logical that the lighter the load, the less likely it is for the cylinder to fail. (Many things are both completely logical and totally false.)

This is one of those instances in which it is entirely possible that the managers (the guys who decide what goes into the box in the way of warning material.) simply abdicated their authority to manage.

As a professor of management, this is one of the things I discuss as I am teaching "Risk Mangement". Every manager manages risk. Lawyers will almost always make recommendations which are intended to reduce risk hopefully to zero. A good manager will listen to the lawyers and use their recommendations as one of the "elements of thought" in the critical thinking and decision making process. The information provided by the lawyers is a necesary part of the process but it should not be taken as the only part of the process.

One might infer from my comments that I view corporate lawyers as the enemy. Nothing could be further from the truth. The real enemy is the manager who takes the legal advice without engaging his brain.
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Old May 27, 2013, 10:29 AM   #10
OutlawJoseyWales
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Great post Doc,
Many don't have to live in a "lawyer-ed up world."
We listen to the lawyers, make our decisions and then hold our breath. Among other things, I'm a high school football coach, so I live that one every day.

If anyone has a modern push lawn mower, you know those things are "so safe" they barely run. read: Someone is reducing their risk.
thanks again Doc, I enjoy your posts.
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Old May 27, 2013, 10:45 AM   #11
Doc Hoy
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Please understand...

...I spit out the word "Lawyer" as though it has a bad taste.

But please understand that I am not disparaging anyone, or any chosen vocation.

I admire the precision with which the legal profession goes about its business.

I know of no organization which has not benefitted on one way or another from the advice provided by the legal staff.

My quarrel is with the managers who believe that every word that proceeds from the legal office must be taken as gospel. In the end, it is just information which must be compared with all of the other information that goes into the management decision.

I really have hijacked this thread!

Sorry guys.
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My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government. Thomas Jefferson
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Old May 27, 2013, 10:48 AM   #12
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Deleted

Posted at the wrong place.
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My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government. Thomas Jefferson

Last edited by Doc Hoy; May 27, 2013 at 11:22 AM.
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Old May 27, 2013, 05:44 PM   #13
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Quote:
Posted at the wrong place.
I been in the right place
But it must have been the wrong time
I'd of said the right thing
But I must have used the wrong line
I been in the right trip
But I must have used the wrong car
My head was in a bad place
And I'm wondering what it's good for
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Old May 27, 2013, 05:50 PM   #14
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Hawg, did I just hear...

...That you made a trip to Ti Juana recently?

;o)
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Old May 27, 2013, 07:00 PM   #15
Striker1
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Any other load recommendations?
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Old May 27, 2013, 07:07 PM   #16
Hawg
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25 is a good starting load for a steel frame. I use 30 and sometimes 35.
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Old May 28, 2013, 09:34 AM   #17
Ricklin
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I'm with Hawg here. I can just stuff in the ball using 35 grains and a felt patch.
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Old May 28, 2013, 12:20 PM   #18
maillemaker
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I believe service charges for these guns was 30 grains. But you will not get optimal accuracy that way.

I use 20 grains in my Pietta 58 Remington .44.

The best way is to set yourself up some cartridges in 2 grain increments from 15 to 25 and see what shoots best with your gun.

Steve
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Old May 29, 2013, 02:47 PM   #19
orangello
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http://thefiringline.com/forums/show....php?p=4344724

I use one .38 special case full or aaaaaaalmost full for each chamber. It's easier for me to keep straight if I get all six loads set out first.
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Old May 30, 2013, 09:48 AM   #20
Noz
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22 grains will allow some compression.
I find 25-28 to be the most accurate and comfortable to shoot.
Your mileage may vary.
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Old May 30, 2013, 02:54 PM   #21
Tortuga12
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Interesting, I use 35 grains of Pyrodex 3F, a wonderwad, and a round ball. Still have some room left over too!
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Old May 30, 2013, 04:46 PM   #22
bn12gg
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Striker-- I've always used 25g of Triple 7 in my .44 Walker. Plenty of umpf on paper.

.02

David
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Old May 30, 2013, 05:42 PM   #23
Striker1
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Thanks all

I finally found my replica Remington flask and though the writing is small, it looks to have a 24 g spout on it. Guess that's where I'll start.
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Old May 31, 2013, 08:52 AM   #24
mykeal
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Don't believe it. Those spouts are notoriously inaccurate. Weigh a charge of real black from it to see what it really throws.
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Old May 31, 2013, 11:04 AM   #25
Striker1
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Quote:
Don't believe it. Those spouts are notoriously inaccurate. Weigh a charge of real black from it to see what it really throws.
mykeal,

I don't "weigh" any powder for my BP guns as it's my understanding charges are measured by volume. I would bet most any BP substitute measured by volume would not weigh the same as real BP...or am I missing something?

Anyway, I can certainly check what the spout measures against my adjustable BP measure.
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