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Old May 24, 2013, 11:04 PM   #1
justplainpossum
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Question for bow hunters regarding boars

There is a chance that my doctor may never sign off on my using a gun again, so...

I was thinking... is it hard to hunt boar with a bow and arrow? I know the girl in the Hunger Games had no problems, lol, but... can a bow and arrow be effective against wild pigs? I've never used a bow and arrow in my life -- not even at summer camp! Is it difficult to learn? I would like to be able to use something, and I'm trying to come up with realistic alternatives. Are there high-tech arrows that can penetrate a boar's tough skin? I'm actually getting excited about this, that maybe I'll actually have an option! What do you recommend? Thanks, guys!

Well, I just looked at some bows on-line. Um, what the heck are those things? They look like, uh, I don't know what they look like! I keep turning my head sideways, but it doesn't look like a bow! More like... I don't know what. Trippy. I guess I should go down to Walmart and hold one; maybe it will make more sense then. I guess that's what high-tech bows look like?

Last edited by justplainpossum; May 25, 2013 at 12:17 AM.
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Old May 25, 2013, 12:06 AM   #2
silvrjeepr
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Question for bow hunters regarding boars

Around the age of 20, a friend and I bow hunted exclusively even through gun season. I recently got into it again after a fifteen year break (friend died in a fire and I lost the urge to bow hunt... Long story). I've got to say the technology now days is AWESOME! My first shot with a modern parallel limb bow made me say WHOA!! Shooting a bow requires more practice than a bow to get proficient. Ammo costs are low though unless you lose arrows. Stick with a top name like Mathews or Hoyt starting out, and find a good shot to keep your bow tuned until you learn to do it yourself. I prefer carbon arrows as they're either straight or broken no in between. No worries about penetration. You be pulling your arrow out of the ground after going through the hog unless you shoot him head on or in the rear. In that case, you'll be skinning the animal to get your arrow back. Feel free to pm me if you have any questions. I'll be happy to help any way I can.

Sorry for being long winded.
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Old May 25, 2013, 12:09 AM   #3
silvrjeepr
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Question for bow hunters regarding boars

Sorry, spell check got me. A bow requires more practice than a gun to shoot accurately. Also, your shots will all be within 40 yards or so depending on how well you shoot.
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Old May 25, 2013, 12:16 AM   #4
justplainpossum
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Thank you, Silver, I will! You're very kind. It's nice to be excited again about a new project, and learning a new skill!
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Old May 25, 2013, 12:17 AM   #5
silvrjeepr
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Question for bow hunters regarding boars

Glad to help. Just don't mind my typing. Lol
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Old May 25, 2013, 01:35 AM   #6
bamaranger
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compounds

Hey 'possum,

What you are seeing, if you really don't know, are referred to as "compound" bows. The pulley/cam systems reduce the "holding" weight of the bow and allow it to be held at full draw easier, making for better aiming, the ability to hold longer, and overall, an easier to shoot bow. Typically, you still need to be able to draw the full draw weight initially, but as the cams and pulleys go to work, you will "hold' less weight. As an easy example, if your bow draws 75 lbs ( a heavy draw for most folks) you will hold 25 once you roll it over.

The other hardware attached is likely high tech arrow rests, sights, likely some sort of stabilizer as well, all that to increase accuracy and shootability.

I've not hunted nor killed any hogs with a bow, but there is a good bit of material on line showing folks who have. HOgs have a gristle shield on the shoulders and an arrow can fail to penetrate the gristle shield. So accuracy is pretty important with hogs and bows.

All that said, , a good, sharp broadhead, (hunting head, with razor sharp, tough blades) placed right, is a very good killer. My own thought is that you need a minimum of 45 lbs of draw weight, and an arrow/head combo that weighs around 400 grains. I'd want a fixed blade head as opposed to the new expandables, but I am old school. More would be better, IF you can shoot it accurately. You need to be able to consistently hit a 6-9" pie plate. When you can't, you have reached your max range.

You do not need to shoot a compound, lots of folks shoot more traditional stick and string bows. They are just as efficient killers, and a lot less complicated. But the full/heavier draw weight makes them harder to shoot for most folks.

If you are serious, I suggest you visit a local bow shop. Hold off on buying anything right away. See if they will let you shoot some different rigs.
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Old May 25, 2013, 01:44 AM   #7
Newton24b
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any physical injury that precludes you from using a rifle, shotgun, or handgun, is going to preclude you from using a bow.

I hate to spoil the fun, but a bow requires alot more in the physical department then a rifle. it does. even if you use modern compounds, your going to find that ,say a shoulder injury lets pretend you have limited range of movement, that is going to keep you from aiming a gun thats on a bench is going to have you shooting everything your not aiming at with arrows. like my drill sergeant said "safest place on the firing range is infront of the target"

you need to look at a crossbow. sure its holding it out like a rifle, the weight distribution is different but there is no physical demand put upon your arms/shoulders for drawing it or holding it at draw.

funny thing on compounds, the big heavy letoff actually amkes them harder to shoot. saw a beatiful bow article on that in a bow hunting rag.
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Old May 25, 2013, 02:08 AM   #8
mxsailor803
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I agree with newton on this one. If you can't shoot a rifle safely, no go for a bow as well. Sorry.
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Old May 25, 2013, 02:11 AM   #9
bamaranger
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crossbow

Yeah, I thought about a crossbow after posting. In some states they are legal archery gear, in others you can get one approved if you have a disability. Getting a heavy crossbow to lock, however, is not always an easy task.

Newton, that draw weight business has got to be subjective.
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Old May 25, 2013, 06:27 AM   #10
justplainpossum
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Wow, that's disappointing. I thought bow and arrow because I can't have any kind of concussive force going off near my head (muffs or not, doesn't matter).

Okay, I'll try checking out a crossbow, and see what that feels like.
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Old May 25, 2013, 09:45 AM   #11
silvrjeepr
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Question for bow hunters regarding boars

If it's just concussive force that is the problem, you're probably fine for a bow. I'd check with your doc before trying though.
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Old May 25, 2013, 01:29 PM   #12
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Silvrjeepr is right I doubt it has any concussive force, but a doctor would know best. My Matthews Creed is so quiet you can barely hear it. Todays modern bows will be suitable for any game, not just pigs. Google Fred Bear images, and it might surprise you.

The only thing that concerns me is your other posts were concerning close quarters defense from these pigs. I'm not sure if this is going to be a suitable choice. For hunting yes, for up close, I'd prefer the bear mace you were thinking about. For hunting applications though it should be great. Plus it's cheap to shoot. During the ammo crisis I just shot my bow everyday.
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Old May 25, 2013, 01:40 PM   #13
arch308
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I would second the crossbow. Easier to learn to shoot. My brother went thru 2 cancer surgeries and can't draw a compound bow. With the use of a cocking rope the crossbow is no problem for him. He has a good crossbow scope on it and can easily hit targets out past 50 yds.
They are a little heavy to carry around but you cock them and leave them ready to shoot at a moments notice. Aim and shoot just like a rifle, no concussion.
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Old May 25, 2013, 08:32 PM   #14
justplainpossum
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Oh, I like the sound of that (and the bear spray). I like the idea of it being cocked in case a boar decides to charge me. This could end up being kinda cool!

By the way, they did a show last night on Animal Planet called Attack of the Mutant Pigs, something like that. Kinda lame title, but it was a very,very good show on the extent of the problem we have out here, and one of the hunters featured was a woman who used what I think is a crossbow.
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Old May 25, 2013, 09:36 PM   #15
silvrjeepr
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Question for bow hunters regarding boars

An acquaintance of mine owns a chunk of land in Arkansas and makes a fortune off of guided hog hunts. They use pit bulls to drag them down, then kill them with Bowie knives. Not my cup of tea, but like I said, he pulls in grand theft for the hunts
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Old May 26, 2013, 12:58 AM   #16
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Other than a second medical opinion, I think you're out of luck... The one crossbow I shot had much more recoil than a .223 Rem.

If recoil is the problem, a .223 with a muzzle break is about as close to recoil free as you're going to get. My pellet gun has more recoil than a .223 with a break.

Tony
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Old May 26, 2013, 01:43 AM   #17
justplainpossum
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No, it's not the recoil at all; I loved shooting my .45 and .357. (and just when I was getting good, too!) It's the percussive effect near my head that I have to be so careful of now (the new normal, unfortunately). So it does sound like the crossbow is something for me to check out, if I can learn to handle it.
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Old May 26, 2013, 01:59 AM   #18
bamaranger
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problem

The problem w/ a crossbow, at least many of the modern, compound models, is that they are large, heavy and awkward to tote very far at all. The recent ones I've handled seemed to have no easy place to grasp either.

No bid deal if your going to walk a couple of hundred yards to a food plot. But going any distance, up and down and they seem clunky.


A modern compound carries OK, dangled by the sting in one hand, and a recurve more so.

Again, try some before you decide.
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Old May 27, 2013, 02:42 AM   #19
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I still think a second medical opinion is worth it. My pain doctor is anti gun and hunting so I don't talk about it around him. If your doctor is one of those, it might be skewing his opinion.

Also it wouldn't hurt to ask your doctor about shooting a shotgun from hip height. That's not too near your head and from short distance still accurate. A 20g with 00 buck could still save your bacon. Sorry I couldn't resist that pun.

I wonder if a suppressor would reduce the compressive shock wave enough to let you shoot a rifle again. If so it would be expensive but perhaps doable. I don't know how this would be measured so if it's possible, then others with more experience would have to chime in.

Now that you've let us in on the problem, we can offer you out of the box suggestions...

One last thing. You could invite other hunters from places that don't have pigs to shoot to come help with the problem. I'm too far away but others might not be...

Tony
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Old May 27, 2013, 08:42 AM   #20
g.willikers
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Oh, don't be a wimp.
Use a spear.
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Old May 27, 2013, 08:55 AM   #21
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I know some guys who have had no problems busting through the "shield" on a big boar using newer compounds. That said, the vitals are a lot lower on a hog and the shield doesn't go that far down in most cases. There are a lot of people who kills boars all the time with bows.
The best advice is go to a bow shop and get professional advice on the right bow, fit, arrows, shooting lessons, etc. it doesn't take long at all to get proficient with a compound bow and the right lesson or two.
You don't need to buy a 1,000 dollar bow either. Any of the mid range $500+/- bows will do just fine for you.
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Old May 27, 2013, 01:13 PM   #22
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Lots of people boar hunt with bows. Check out Youtube. You will see plenty.
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Old May 27, 2013, 06:13 PM   #23
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Unless you plan to hunt hogs from a tree stand, I think using a bow to take one is dangerous to the point of foolhardiness. I know, people do it from ground level. People do all manner of dangerous things I wouldn't. But I've never been that much of an adrenalin junkie.

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Old May 27, 2013, 06:32 PM   #24
g.willikers
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Just don't miss.
A bow and arrow is still a formidable weapon.
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Old May 28, 2013, 02:22 PM   #25
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Add on..

I meant to tell you as well justplainpossum, I don't know what your Wal-mart is like, but I would avoid it for your archery needs, and advice. Try a local pro shop(the little door or counter with the boes in your local gun store.) I think a good pro shop is just as important, or more so to a novice archer, than any brand/product. Look for one that has several different brands, i.e. Hoyt, Matthews, Bowtech, PSE. Never buy a bow without shooting it first. If you have to shoot ten different bows several times so be it. Also feel free to p.m. if you need help.
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