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Old May 21, 2013, 11:28 PM   #1
dakota.potts
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Shotgun for turkey

I posted a thread not long ago detailing my dilemma whether to hunt or not.

My dad and I are going to go out, starting with fishing, so I can take my own food and learn to clean it and cook it.

If I still feel I need to after that (I don't see any reason I wouldn't) I will take some hunter safety courses and get the proper licensing and everything and work my way up to the other animals.

So, I figure, it'll be fun to think about some of the gear since I'm a gear head

We have a .308 that I think could be used for deer or, if necessary, probably a hog (anyone care to comment on that?) But I'm thinking for turkey and possibly other fowl a shotgun makes the most sense.

I do want to start competing in shooting competitions so I'm weighing the benefit of getting a "standard" shotgun such as a Mossberg 500 and putting in the hunting insert vs. buying a single or double barrel shotgun that might be cheaper (and I kind of have a liking for).

Our .308 is nice but the recoil kind of beats me up. I get about 10 shots in 5-10 minutes before I have to step away because it hurts more than I enjoy it at that point. With that said, I'm not sure if it would be necessary or even beneficial to buy a 12 gauge so I'm considering 16 or 20 as well.

I also really enjoy my CZ handgun so I was looking at their line. The double barrel shotguns (Over/Under and Side by side) seem to be much more expensive which I don't understand.

The only other information I can give you is that I am a small statured person and will be hunting in Florida. I have no date yet in mind (it won't be too soon) so it's not a time important decision. I turn 18 in August so I probably would buy it after that date. I would like to stay in the sub $400 range if possible.
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Old May 22, 2013, 02:32 AM   #2
natman
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1) A 308 will be excellent for hogs

2) A shotgun of some kind will be required for birds, including turkey. With a $400 budget, I'd recommend a Mossberg 500 or a Remington 870 Express with a standard 28" barrel and choke tubes. Use the full or extra full for turkey, the modified or improved cylinder for wingshooting.

Do not make the mistake of buying a sub-$500 double shotgun.
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Old May 22, 2013, 02:39 AM   #3
bamaranger
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turkeys

Bagging a wild turkey is no small feat. I'm for anybody getting in that wants to, but to start on gobblers is setting the bar pretty high. There's lots of stuff you can hunt and eat that will not be as much of a challenge.

I think a 24-26" 12 ga pump w/ tubes would be a heck of a versatile gun. Single barrels are affordable, but most kick like mules w/ full power ammo, and the one shot is a handicap in some instances.

I like doubles, but a good one is expensive as you have noted. The catch is that a well set up double, that is durable and in which both barrels shoot to point of aim, takes a bit of craftsmanship and attention to detail. Cheaper and import guns often do not hold up over time, and do not shoot to point of aim frequently.

There is not a pig around that will withstand a .308.
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Old May 22, 2013, 05:28 PM   #4
dakota.potts
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The idea behind the turkey (or other waterfowl) is that it is more manageable to clean than a full deer or hog. We're doing this as a family outing. My dad can teach me to clean a bird. Processing a deer is something he's never learned, so I would have to turn to outside help.

However, I'd be all for other reasonable starting places including deer if that's a more achievable goal in the short term.
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Old May 22, 2013, 05:37 PM   #5
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You could try rabbit or squirrel, both only need a .22lr or you could use a shotgun. They are easy to clean and smaller/more manageable than deer/hogs. There are some good youtube videos showing how to clean them. Hunting them isn't too hard either.
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Old May 22, 2013, 06:24 PM   #6
dakota.potts
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I had thought about that but doubt I will get anybody in my family other than me to eat rabbit or squirrel
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Old May 22, 2013, 07:17 PM   #7
Brian Pfleuger
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Deer are less annoying to process, IMO, than turkeys. Feathers are a pain in the butt. Deer are simple. You can watch a YouTube video to learn how to gut one and you'll suck at it until you get some practice. Processing after the gutting is easy. Hang it in a tree, I prefer backside up, and cut the meat off. You'll learn the efficient methods soon enough. There are videos showing that too.

In any case, I'd look for a used Rem 870 or better yet an old 1100 or 1187 if you can find one for the price. Old 1100s (IME) have triggers that are unbelievable by today's standards and the semi-auto have less recoil.
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Old May 22, 2013, 07:53 PM   #8
dakota.potts
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Wow. Those 1100's are very elegant. I am not finding many below $700 or so however. I definitely want one now.

This is good information, however, and it seems like it may be longer than I thought until I'm in need of a shotgun!
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Old May 23, 2013, 01:42 AM   #9
natman
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Quote:
I had thought about that but doubt I will get anybody in my family other than me to eat rabbit or squirrel
Just call it Lapin and Arboreal venison.
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Old May 23, 2013, 03:21 AM   #10
Todd1700
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Quote:
I had thought about that but doubt I will get anybody in my family other than me to eat rabbit or squirrel
Cooked up a big pot of rabbit and rice once and told some friends who would never have eaten rabbit that it was swamp chicken. They ate it like they had been lost in the woods for a week.

Quote:
I would like to stay in the sub $400 range if possible.
Then you are probably looking at either a 870 Remington or Mossberg 500 pump. Nothing wrong with either one. Contrary to the beliefs of some you do not need a 1200 dollar Benelli to kill turkeys and other small game.
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Old May 23, 2013, 09:32 PM   #11
dakota.potts
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So, new twist to the equation.

I was at Gander today looking for a 1911 for dad for Father's Day. We also shouldered a bunch of shotguns. I tried an 870, a Mossberg 500, and 870 with all Magpul aftermarket pieces, etc.

Nothing feels good. I have a very short "wingspan" and I had a very hard time shouldering any of them appropriately. The stock is too long and I have to hold it like a big log which restricts my access to the sights, trigger, and pump.

Am I doing something wrong? Or should I look for a small shotgun?
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Old May 23, 2013, 10:59 PM   #12
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Possibly try a youth model?
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Old May 23, 2013, 11:10 PM   #13
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I bought my wife a youth model Browning BPS 20 GA. Fits like a glove.
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Old May 23, 2013, 11:56 PM   #14
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Quote:
Contrary to the beliefs of some you do not need a 1200 dollar Benelli to kill turkeys and other small game.
Nor do you need spendy "Turkey Loads"- I've killed more with 12 guage #6 field loads than anything else..... Eldest daughter got her first bird with a 20 guage 7 1/2 trap load..... shoot them in the head/neck, and they will die.

Quote:
should I look for a small shotgun?
Quote:
Possibly try a youth model?
This.
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Old May 24, 2013, 02:35 AM   #15
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I'm actually a fan of the youth shotguns mostly due to the fact that if you wear any kinda equip that may go over the shoulder its still comfortable for me. Personally, I hate cleaning turkeys. My dad and I can hang, skin, de-bone while hanging, and chill down a deer in roughly 30-40 minutes. Granted we've probably have done 3-400 deer together (between hunting with clubs, friends, and ourselves). Hogs, try your best to save those for the colder months. If you never have cleaned a hog, your first time may be your last time. You planning to hunt in Fl or head up to Ga or SC?
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Old May 24, 2013, 10:22 AM   #16
Grant D
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To bad you're so far away. I have a Renington 1100 Youth Model with the nice wood and blueing that I bought for my son years ago that only has a few boxs of shells through it,with chokes for $400.00
So they are out there for sale used.
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Old May 24, 2013, 01:35 PM   #17
dakota.potts
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I'll be hunting in Florida.

As far as youth models, if I wanted a similar size load in a youth model, would it have more recoil? I don't know if I'd go 12 gauge in a smaller model, more likely it would be 20.
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Old May 25, 2013, 01:58 AM   #18
mxsailor803
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No. A youth model just means that the butt stock (the stock that actually touches your shoulder) is a little bit shorter. It was intended for people with shorter arms.
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Old May 25, 2013, 09:40 AM   #19
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Youth model 20 gauge with full choke and 2 3/4" shells with #4 or #6 shot (the shells should be marked for turkey loads), will be more than sufficient and the recoil will be less bothersome if the gun fits you. The extra weight of a longer stock and barrel won't help if the gun is uncomfortable in your hands. It will face slap you and beat your shoulder because you are not in a good shooting position. I use my 20 for both turkey and deer hunting and it is my primary home defense gun, you lose practically nothing except number of pellets in the shell by doing 20 gauge instead of 12 gauge. Your shoulder will appreciate it and the turkey will not notice the difference.
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Old May 25, 2013, 05:21 PM   #20
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Mossberg makes youth shotguns with a couple of different LOPs, I think 12" and 13". You can also get a shim set that will let you adjust both the length and the angle of the buttstock to get a custom-ish fit. And they also come with a coupon for 50% off the price of a standard stock and/or forearm, so if you find there's another shotgun you prefer, the Mossberg would be easy to adapt for someone else to use. I have a 20 ga. youth model as a knock-around shotgun, and it's a handy little gun that both I and my pal, who's quite a bit shorter than I am, can use.
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Old June 1, 2013, 11:26 PM   #21
dakota.potts
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Held a CZ today. Not sure which it was. Semi automatic with a camo pattern. First shotgun I've held that has felt right for me. My dad's convinced I'm just attached to the CZ name on it Anyways, it was $350 so not a bad price.
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