The Firing Line Forums

Go Back   The Firing Line Forums > The Hide > The Art of the Rifle: General

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old May 1, 2013, 06:51 PM   #1
osbornk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 11, 2012
Location: Marion, Va
Posts: 203
What caliber could it be?

My brother has a J.Stevens & Co. pocket rifle that has a patent date of Sept. 6, 1864. It has an 18" smooth bore barrel and a metal screw on stock and a pistol grip. It was made after 1864 but before 1886 when the company name was changed. The problem we have is we don't know what caliber it is. A 44 cartridge is to small and a 45 is to large. What could it be? What is a 44-40?
osbornk is offline  
Old May 1, 2013, 10:02 PM   #2
Jim Watson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: October 25, 2001
Location: Alabama
Posts: 10,595
A .44-40 is the original cartridge for the 1873 and later Winchesters.

It was used as the basis for the .44 Shot and .44 Game Getter; kind of ancestors of the .410 bore shotgun. History at
http://www.fourten.org.uk/mwpre410.html

Unfortunately, .44 Shot has not been loaded in a long time and it is probably not strong enough for .410s.
Jim Watson is offline  
Old May 1, 2013, 10:03 PM   #3
Garycw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 27, 2011
Location: Ohio-Kentucky - florida
Posts: 1,101
What caliber could it be?

.410? The one my grandpa had was, but didn't have the wire looking stock on the pistol grip. It was said to be able to shoot .45 long colt, but always used the .410 for rabbits.

Last edited by Garycw; May 2, 2013 at 08:22 PM.
Garycw is offline  
Old May 2, 2013, 12:46 AM   #4
rc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: April 28, 2001
Location: CA
Posts: 601
I think you need to figure out first if it is rimfire or centerfire by looking at the firng pin. Figure out your bore diameter, Then you need to look at cartridges of the world. There are lots of different cartridges from the 1850 to 1900 time period that were basically dead ends like the Stevens 22 Extra Long and many more.
rc is offline  
Old May 2, 2013, 10:32 AM   #5
PetahW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 19, 2008
Posts: 4,561
.

Your brother doesn't have a Stevens Pocket Rifle (it's a smoothbore) - he has a Stevens No.42 Pocket Shotgun, most likely chambered for the special .44 Everlasting shells (the .44-40 was an option, since it was available in a shot loading before the .410 came along).
They were available as either a 15" bbl ($11) or an 18" bbl ($12) model at the time.

The Everlasting cartridges were just a heavy walled cartridge that could be reloaded almost indifiently.
Almost any Ballard or Stevens rifle could be ordered chambered for Everlasting cases, but, in most cases could also fire normal factory thin walled cartridges.
The .44/50 and .44/65 Stevens Everlasting cartridges were the shot shells primarily used in the Stevens New Model Pocket Shot Gun and in the Stevens Hunters Pet Shot Gun. (Both of these models were smooth bored.)


I wouldn't recommend he (or anyone) fire any .410 ammo in it, by any means.


.

Last edited by PetahW; May 2, 2013 at 04:50 PM.
PetahW is offline  
Old May 2, 2013, 11:02 AM   #6
Mike Irwin
Staff
 
Join Date: April 13, 2000
Location: Northern Virginia
Posts: 35,229
Last post on page one has an advertising page showing the Everlasting shells.

http://www.doublegunshop.com/forums/...09d6c860bbaadb
__________________
"The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind" -Theodorus Gaza

Baby Jesus cries when the fat redneck doesn't have military-grade firepower.
Mike Irwin is offline  
Old May 2, 2013, 05:09 PM   #7
osbornk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 11, 2012
Location: Marion, Va
Posts: 203
A .410 is just slightly larger. The brass will go in about half way. Are the 44.40 and 44 everlasting the same size? He took it in trade about 25 years ago in exchange for doing some bodywork on a car. It was traded to him as a 45/410 but he didn't think about it until this week when I decided to clean it when I was cleaning my weapons (it's been at my house for years). Photo attachment here:

DSCF0830.jpg
Attached Images
File Type: jpg DSCF0829.jpg (241.1 KB, 41 views)
File Type: jpg DSCF0828.jpg (237.6 KB, 34 views)

Last edited by osbornk; May 4, 2013 at 07:09 PM.
osbornk is offline  
Old May 4, 2013, 04:36 PM   #8
Hawg Haggen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: September 8, 2007
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 11,417
A 44-40 is pretty close to a .45 Colt necked down to .44
Hawg Haggen is offline  
Old May 9, 2013, 04:08 PM   #9
Garycw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 27, 2011
Location: Ohio-Kentucky - florida
Posts: 1,101
What caliber could it be?

...

Last edited by Garycw; May 11, 2013 at 07:59 AM.
Garycw is offline  
Old May 11, 2013, 04:16 PM   #10
Scottish Highlander
Senior Member
 
Join Date: February 1, 2013
Posts: 113
Not getting of subject but that is a nice looking gun.... would it be safe to fire if you sorted out the caliber etc
Scottish Highlander is offline  
Old May 12, 2013, 08:00 AM   #11
osbornk
Senior Member
 
Join Date: August 11, 2012
Location: Marion, Va
Posts: 203
It is as solid and tight as a new gun. I was apparently used very little. We have decided it I a 44-40 shot that was discontinued years ago (almost a .410 but before it-the shell is slightly tapered). We found one shell on gunbroker up for bid with a starting bid of $6 + shipping and a box of 40 that had a starting bid of $495 + $30 shipping.
osbornk is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
This site and contents, including all posts, Copyright © 1998-2013 S.W.A.T. Magazine
Copyright Complaints: Please direct DMCA Takedown Notices to the registered agent: thefiringline.com
Contact Us
Page generated in 0.08635 seconds with 8 queries