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Old May 14, 2013, 06:08 PM   #1
Zulu343
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what to do with rusty gun

I recently inherited a Winchester model 12 (1912) from year 1919. However, it has sat in a garage for 5+ years without any care, maybe longer. It now has rust on one side of the reciever - none on the barrel inside or out, minimal on other side of reciever.


I'm sure the rust is through any blueing, but hopefully hasn't pitted the reciever very much. How should I go about dealing with this - I HATE rust, and this has never been an issue with any guns I own.
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Old May 14, 2013, 06:39 PM   #2
jmr40
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It isn't that bad really for a nearly 100 year old gun. I know of no way to completely remove it without removing bluing also. For now I'd wipe down with oil to keep it from getting worse. On a less rare gun I'd carefully polish with 0000 steel wool to knock the surface rust off and just use it. On this one I might ask for professional help. Overall this gun looks very good for its age to me.
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Old May 14, 2013, 06:49 PM   #3
cvc944
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Treat the wood and metal to a nice refinish. I notice you have a poly choke on the end of the barrel, so it really isn't going to hurt the value any more to make it look new.
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Old May 14, 2013, 07:10 PM   #4
jaguarxk120
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If you have the gun reblued, make sure who does the work knows how to blue a Winchester Model 12. The recievers have a high nickle content and if temperatures are not held right the reciever comes out in a red/plum color.
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Old May 15, 2013, 01:52 AM   #5
natman
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Gentle rubbing with lots of light oil and 0000 (four zero) steel wool will remove most of that rust.

You won't damage the bluing if you use oil and have the slightest concept of the phrase "gentle rubbing".
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Old May 15, 2013, 06:06 AM   #6
CajunBass
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Personally, I wouldn't worry about it. It's almost 100 years old. I've got more rust on me and I'm not that old.

I'd wipe it down with an oily rag, and let it wear it's battle scars with pride.
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Old May 15, 2013, 08:28 AM   #7
Rifleman1776
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I agree with others. It is not that bad. Some 0000 steel wool and light oil. Then (I would) put some Oxypho Blue over it and enjoy.
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Old May 15, 2013, 10:55 AM   #8
Ricklin
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I am a big fan of the Model 12. Is there a choke marking on the barrel? If it does have a choke indicated on the barrel, I say go for the 4-0 steel wool and oil, then touch up the bluing. If there is no choke marking on the barrel, disregard and seek the help of a pro.
I am pretty certain if your manuf. date is correct you don't have a Winchester factory installed poly choke. In that case it's just another Model 12 with a poly choke. Not that that is a bad thing, but the collector value is nonexistent.
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Old May 15, 2013, 12:45 PM   #9
Zulu343
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OK, thanks for the replies. I'll try to go very light with 0000 steel wool and oil first. Probably just leave it that way. If it bugs me too much, I'll consider re-blueing, either at home or by a pro.

I also checked out what the poly choke is. I didn't know what it was or the name of it before. Looks like it basically takes away any collectible value. (it was not factory original, the bbl does have a choke designation on it.) Fine with me anyways, I have another 'collectible' gun and every time I see it I think I'd rather be shooting it than collecting it.

From what I've managed to read, the poly choke works pretty well - I'll give it a go.
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Old May 16, 2013, 04:44 AM   #10
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I can't tell for sure from the picture, I think that's not a "Poly-Choke", rather I think it's a "Cutts Compensator." Sort of a muzzle brake that you can change chokes with. They were pretty popular back in the day when a man might use one gun for everything. Man those things are LOUD. You do not want to be standing beside one when it goes off. You talk about muzzle blast. I could always tell when someone was using one. They make more of a BOOSH than a Bang.

I'm not sure if they came with other choke tubes or if you had to buy them, but the choke tubes just screwed in and out.
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Old May 16, 2013, 01:32 PM   #11
Bake
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I would give the Model 12 a light coat of "Ed's Red", and shoot it intill it falls apart. Its deserve "no-less". Never judge a Model 12 by its blue job, but by its "Hits" and its action ("Best Pump" ever made)....
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Old May 16, 2013, 02:03 PM   #12
Bill DeShivs
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Use the 0000 steel wool dry. Gently (very) scrub the rust. Wipe everything off, then oil the gun.
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Old May 17, 2013, 01:14 PM   #13
publius
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Soak the rust spots down with KROIL and let it soak for about a week (wet again when needed. Wipe dry and rub lightly with 0000 steel wool. Note I said wipe the oil off before you use the steel wool and wipe the rust off with a clean cloth every couple of strokes with the steel wool. Always listen to Bill Deshivs when it comes to finishes.He knows his stuff! I just think pre-soaking with Kroil works better. I'm sure he will agree that it can't hurt.
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