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Old April 22, 2013, 01:48 PM   #1
LockedBreech
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Negative consequences to PX4 stainless guide rod?

So, I've done a lot of reading and research about guide rods, and I was finally able to find a fresh recoil spring/guide rod assembly for my 5,000-round flawless, 5-year-old Beretta PX4. I'm thinking I'll send the new assembly to Steve Bedair for one of his custom captured recoil spring stainless guide rods.

I'm not much concerned about whether it's worth the money, and I know polymer guide rods are fine 99% of the time, but my question is - will the stainless rod have a negative impact on my totally flawless (so far) pistol?

Just in case it does I'll be keeping the used, proven guide rod assembly.
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Old April 22, 2013, 02:01 PM   #2
915A
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Re: Negative consequences to PX4 stainless guide rod?

I wouldnt see why it would.
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Old April 22, 2013, 04:10 PM   #3
ShootingNut
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What might you gain with the change?
The PX4 is a great gun, and yours has been "flawless".
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Old April 22, 2013, 04:17 PM   #4
LockedBreech
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Negative consequences to PX4 stainless guide rod?

Mostly I'm going for long-term longevity. This was my first pistol and I intend to keep it forever. It's almost my primary nightstand and car gun and gets shot frequently. I'm just looking to keep it in good health for the duration of my life. It was a gift and has a lot of sentimental value since my dad gave it to me but it also is very practically used day-to-day
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Old April 22, 2013, 04:27 PM   #5
ShootingNut
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I see your point, makes sense.
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Old April 22, 2013, 08:34 PM   #6
57K
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I don't think you'll gain much, but I would feel better about a solid stainless guide rod. I put one in my XDm that had a hollow steel tube and I plan to get one for my new Ruger SR9, but mainly so I can change recoil springs. There should not be any negative effect whatsoever.
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Old April 22, 2013, 09:46 PM   #7
HKFan9
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Call the manufactures and see what they will tell you.

From a few reps in the industry (I won't name company names) said they do not and will not recommend steel or any metal guide rods in their firearms. Issue is they are generally a loosely fitted part, being made from plastic, it causes no issues, being made from metal opens up potential for issues.

Generally, plastic works just fine, thats why they use it, also if you do switch and the tiny chance it does cause an issue, or any issue does happen, it will generally void the warranty on the gun, they are pretty good at making notice of fine details, I have gotten more and more guns back recently at work that the factories will not cover under warranty.
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Old April 22, 2013, 11:05 PM   #8
+1k ammo
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I would just keep it stock as it could open up some issues since it was not designed and tested with a full metal rod.

I shoot my 9mm px4 often as I can and i really like the gun and the feel and it has been most reliable with all kinds of ammo. Great gun!!

Not to hi-jack, but since you are on replacement parts for px4, is there anything to make the DO a little less? Mine is a bit hard to pull off the first shot although within specs I believe - just wondering if different spring or something would work.

thanks.
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Old April 22, 2013, 11:31 PM   #9
LockedBreech
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Negative consequences to PX4 stainless guide rod?

How old is your PX4? After 5 years and a lot of practice with snap caps, my trigger smoothed considerably.
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Old April 23, 2013, 08:51 AM   #10
Walt Sherrill
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Generally speaking, a guide rod is NOT a highly-stressed part. Converting plastic to metal is generally advocated by folks who are just uncomfortable with plastic, but not by folks who really understand what materials work best for specific applications.

Several CZ compacts have alloy frames and small plastic (somewhat flexible) guide rods. They work fine. A number of users have converted from plastic to stainless guide rods; CZ has warned against this -- noting, in a few cases, that the guide rods may be HARDER than the frame against which they rest. (An option that others have tried are using brass hinge pins from Stanley, which are close to the same size -- modified to be the proper length -- and less hard than stainless steel.) I've talked with a factory CZ gunsmith who said they have seen frame wear on the alloy-framed models at the receiver stop [the place where the base of the guide rests]. Such wear, if allowed to continue, will eventually allow the guide rod to slide around with unpredictable results. Such wear/damage is NOT covered under warranty on the alloy guns. (While steel guide rods are available for other models, CZ will not sell a steel guide rod to the owner of an alloy model if CZ knows it will be used in that model.)

It is entirely possible, because of it's different mechanism and non-tilting barrel, that this is less of an issue with a PX4 than other guns -- as the guide rod has a much different range of motion during recoil. I'm unfamiliar with the PX4, but would suggest that if you feel you MUST have a steel guide rod, keep an eye on the frame area where the rod interacts with the frame -- whether that area is steel, steel covered by plastic, or just plastic. I have seen plastic guide rods (with controlled springs) break in Glocks, and the gun continue to run as before. Unless broken pieces can jam up the gun, the springs (or springs) themselves are held in place by the dust cover, etc., so function is likely to be little changed.


.

Last edited by Walt Sherrill; April 23, 2013 at 09:03 AM.
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