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Old April 21, 2013, 06:29 PM   #1
FALPhil
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Ever Seen An Arisaka Like This?

I was literally out in the middle of nowhere yesterday, and I ran across a Teishin Rakkasan Shyoujyu Type 2. Never seen one in this good of shape. It is now in my safe. It is a genuine war trophy and I got the provenance with it. All matching.









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Old April 21, 2013, 06:37 PM   #2
tahunua001
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ok phil... you have officially made me jealous... I would love to one day find one at all, no less in such good condition... if you don't mind my asking how much did you spend? that's a $2000 rifle easily.
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Old April 21, 2013, 07:10 PM   #3
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I was thinking more like $3500, because I saw one at Chuck's Firearms for that much and it is not near as good of shape.

Would you believe a yard sale for $100, "because you can't get ammo for it anymore?" That would make a good story, but it wouldn't be the truth. This rifle was brought home by a US Navy carpenters mate (now known as damage controlman) on an LST which was the 3rd vessel inside Tokyo Bay on 29 August 1945 for the surrender ceremony. After unloading security troops, weapons, and vehicles on the Japanese navy pier and establishing a perimeter, the sailors were allowed to go ashore in small parties for short periods to gather souveniers. There was a pile of rifles on the pier. The sailor who chose this rifle picked it up because "it was different from all the others." After a couple of days, the skipper on the vessel ordered all souvenier small arms turned in to the gunners mate so that the mums could be defaced (McArthur's orders) and the firing pins be removed. The rifle was turned in, recorded in inventory, the firing pin removed. Upon returning to the US (San Diego), the rifle was taken out of inventory and returned to the carpenters mate. Unknown to the captain, the carpenters mate and the gunners mate were best friends. The rifle was returned to the carpenters mate with an intact mum and the firing pin (with the correct number) was returned separately.

So, how much did I pay? Nothing. The carpenters mate was married to my mother's older sister. He knows that I have a WWII collection and a while back he and I had a discussion that war trophies are such a piece of history need to stay in the family. A few months ago, my aunt died. This weekend was the first time that I had a chance to see him since the funeral. He literally lives out in the middle of nowhere. I was asking him about some of his Navy days, and he asked if I remembered our conversation. I told him I did, and he said, "I want you to keep my war trophy in the family." He took me back to his bedroom and pulled the rifle out. It was wrapped in an old curtain. When he unwrapped it, I almost peed myself. I told him one of his grandsons should have it. Neither of his children nor any of his 4 grandchildren have any interest, so he gave it to me for safekeeping.

It will hold a place of honor alongside the Type 99 that was brought back from the Philippines by my wife's cousin.
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Old April 21, 2013, 07:26 PM   #4
tahunua001
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amazing story... it's such a great thing to see such guns stay in the family and go to people that appreciate them.

that gun is worth more than my whole milsurp collection put together and you got it for free

I think I hate you just a little bit
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Old April 21, 2013, 07:40 PM   #5
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Congrats. Great story.
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Old April 22, 2013, 06:34 AM   #6
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that sir... is one fine rifle... very, very nice
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Old April 22, 2013, 07:44 AM   #7
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Wonderful story, couldn't happen to a nicer guy. Congrats.

I am jealous as hell!
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Old April 22, 2013, 10:08 AM   #8
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FALPhil
My grandmothers brother brought back a Type 44 with a similar story. Their step sister got it from him and gave it to me some 45 years ago. I recently continued the tradition and gave it to my neice. It was in fair condition, same as it was when I got it - minus the mum and dust cover - but he had put a GI M1 carbine sling on it, which it still wears.
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Old April 22, 2013, 11:46 AM   #9
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Your story. and other similar stories, makes this forum worthwhile. Thank you for posting the photos and history lesson.
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Old April 22, 2013, 11:54 AM   #10
sir_n0thing
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Re: Ever Seen An Arisaka Like This?

Now that is a great story! Congrats on a beautiful piece of history.
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Old April 22, 2013, 12:21 PM   #11
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Sweet!
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Old April 22, 2013, 09:23 PM   #12
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Thanks, everyone. I didn't do anything to deserve this. But I do truly love my uncle and have all my life. Some of my fondest childhood memories are from the days I spent on his farm. I really wish one of his grandsons was interested. He is actually an in-law to me. If one of them ever expresses interest, I will surrender it, with the stipulation that if they are ever tempted to sell it, I get first right of refusal.

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Tell you what, tahunua. If I come up to Idaho, you take me hunting in the Pahsimeroi. I'll bring it with me and you can put a magazine full down range.
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Old April 22, 2013, 09:59 PM   #13
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What a beautiful example of gun makers art. That it is mass produced military is amazing. Does anyone know how the chrysanthemums on the bolt were made?
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Old April 22, 2013, 11:06 PM   #14
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Thanks for sharing that story! Milsurp rifles have a special place in my heart. i wish all of my old war horses had a voice like yours does. it sounds like that rifle will be passed down generation upon generation, telling an amazing story of this countrys greatest generation.

if it was mine, numbers wouldnt be able to accurately describe its value.

enjoy your wonderful piece.
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Old April 23, 2013, 12:30 AM   #15
tahunua001
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Quote:
What a beautiful example of gun makers art. That it is mass produced military is amazing. Does anyone know how the chrysanthemums on the bolt were made?
the mums are stamped onto the receiver, not the bolts. sometimes you'll find one that was double struck as it wasn't deep enough the first time.
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Tell you what, tahunua. If I come up to Idaho, you take me hunting in the Pahsimeroi. I'll bring it with me and you can put a magazine full down range.
I'm not exactly certain what a Pahsimeroi is but if you are ever in the Lewiston area let me know, I have some places to plink that few ever see
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Old April 23, 2013, 06:43 AM   #16
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That is an awesome Arisaka, I am so glad Bubba didnt get this one. That Rifle needs to be preserved just like it is.
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Old April 23, 2013, 09:50 AM   #17
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that is a thing of beauty. I'm glad to hear it's staying in family so it and its story can be passed down.
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Old April 23, 2013, 12:00 PM   #18
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Tahuna, I guess what I was talking about is the safety knob. http://thumbs3.ebaystatic.com/d/l225...EfQh4Urn6w.jpg
Looking closer, it looks like it was cast maybe.
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Old April 25, 2013, 03:54 PM   #19
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The checkering pattern on the Arisaka safety was machined, apparently in a two-pass operation. The lines on the side would have been put on by forcing the part through a die. That was done while the part was "in the white" and soft; it would be hardened and rust blued later.

All that work was eliminated in the late-war rifles, where the weld that joined the knob and the spindle was left as it was and the safety knob was not checkered.

Jim
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Old April 25, 2013, 04:23 PM   #20
scrubcedar
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Thanks James. I may end up getting a nice arisaka just because I find them beautiful. I love good machinery that looks good too.
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Old April 25, 2013, 11:37 PM   #21
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Many folks judge the Arisaka by the late Type 99's, but the Type 38's and even the early Type 99's were very well made. I have a Type 38 short rifle (not a carbine) that may have belonged to some elite unit. It is in near new condition and as well made and finished as anything that came out of Oberndorf. It is also very smooth, and has an excellent trigger pull.

Jim
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Old April 26, 2013, 12:00 AM   #22
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Is there any difference in factory ammo availability between the 6.5x50 vs the 7.7x58? That may determine what I look at first.
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Old April 26, 2013, 11:26 AM   #23
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Both are available. Google "7.7 Jap ammo" and "6.5 Jap ammo".

There are NO large quantities of original military ammo available; both calibers are in the collector category.

Jim
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Old April 26, 2013, 02:16 PM   #24
tahunua001
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Quote:
Is there any difference in factory ammo availability between the 6.5x50 vs the 7.7x58? That may determine what I look at first.
7.7 is a little easier to get ahold of but Cabelas has 6.5 so it's not too bad. grafs has store brand stuff in both calibers loaded by hornady and uses PPU brass but so far every time I've looked it up they are out. PPU used to have loaded in both calibers but now they just make brass for hornady and a couple dinky brands.
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ignore my complete lack of capitalization. I still have no problem correcting your grammar.
I never said half the crap people said I did-Albert Einstein
You can't believe everything you read on the internet-Benjamin Franklin
Bean counters told me I couldn't fire a man for being in a wheelchair, did it anyway. Ramps are expensive.-Cave Johnson.
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Old April 27, 2013, 10:32 AM   #25
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Some years back a neighbor of a good buddy of mine ended up with the same type of rifle. Although I had an Arisaka I had no idea what it was so my buddy and I researched it. What the OP has is an Arisaka paratrooper. The key to function and value for this rifle is that the front half and back half are original to each other. The two halves are hand fitted to one another and mismatches are a huge issue as to function and value. A matching rifle is a very valuable rifle. A mismatched rifle will have serious issues as to proper function and will basically be a wallhanger. My buddy's neighbor's paratrooper was a mismatch. I don't recall how we determined that, whether it was by serial number or some other mark.
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